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June 28, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THUJ

SODA PRICE BALLOT

t and mail to:
The Wolverine,
ass Buildinig,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
(Mark X before statement of your opinion)
] I believe the prices charged for sodas and sundaes in
rbor are too high, and should be reduced.
] I believe the prices charged for sodas and sundaes in
rbor are not too high.
Name...........................

Address........... ..... . ......

fW
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

...ANTS MADE ON
MPUS SODA PRICES
ntinued from Page One)
such high rates, we would
e a general price reduction.,"
n H. Scott, '22, Varsity debat-.
father's prices in the drug
Detroit are 11 cents for
7 cents for sundaes, and 6
'cokes',tandhe makes rea-
profits at these rates."
Fehling, Grad: "Of course
rtoo jhigh. In Chicago, by
sive campaign, the papers
en, able to shake down the;
half a dozen of the biggest!
n the city to 11 cents. We
shake them down here. The
ver, but they don't want to
mtally, you can buy cokes'.
nion for 5 cents, whereas all
e street dealers charge 10."
eorge A. May, physical di-
of ' Waterman gymnasium:
ices charged for sodas and
iks on State street are too
here is no reasou, why fhe
ear the campus ' should be
ian the ones down town. The
r sodas and soft drinks on
eet have come down with the
d trend on all goods, while
ar the University have not re-
'to this change.

"It is unreasonable to maintain the
high prices just to hold up the stu-
dents. I think the prices of drinks,
and sodas' in general should come'
down."
Dr. H. L. French, grad, interne at
the Homoeopathic hospital: "The
prices charged at the State street
stores for sodas and sundaes are way
too high. Sodas ought to be 10
cents, with no war tax."
Renaud Sherwood, '22; "There
seems to be no justification for the
present high prices. Food rates have
come down everywhere. It seems to
be another application of the old
axiom that you can sell ' a college
student anything.",
Students Imposed On
Alfred May, '22E: "Prices should
come down, without a doubt. The stu-
dents are being imposed upon and
should be brought to realize it."
Prof. Earl V. Moore, of the School
of Music faculty: "I am inclined to
express disapprobation of the present
soda prices in Ann Arbor. Detroit
prices are much lower, and I see no
reason why this condition should not
obtain here."
Wallace F. Elliott, '23, intramural
manager for next year: "'Prices here
certainly are too high and they ought
to come down. I just came back from
Port Huron and they are much lower
there. State street dealers certainly
are doing all they can to bleed the
students-I am convinced of that."
C. E. Myers, special student: "The
ice cream sold in Ann Arbor is rank

in comparison to that in Rochester,
N. Y. The three-colored bricks sell
for 40 and 80 cents for the pint and
quart respectively in Ann Arbor, while
the prices for the same thing are 35i
and 60 cents in Rochester. 'Cokes'
have always been seven cents there."
OFFICIAL NOTICES
''All noticesafor this column should
be in the, hands of 'Oscar L. Buhr;
Assistant to the President, by 9:30
o'clock on the morning of each day
of issue, Tuesday, Thursday, and Sat-
urday.
Members of the Yellow Dog society,
honor fraternity for educators, will
gather for initiation ceremonies im-
mediately following the meeting of the
Men's Educational club. Thursday eve-
ning in the second floor reading room
of the Michigan Union.
The following changes in the Sum-
mer, -session program have been
made: Prof. C. C. Fries will speak
at 5 o'clock Friday, July 29, on "For-
mal English Grammar; -Its History
and Abuse", in place of Mr. T. E.
Johnson, superintendent of public in,
struction, Lansing, who was to have
spoken on "The Outlook in Educa-
tion".
Prof. I. D. Scott will speak at 8
o'clock Friday on "Michigan's, In-
land Lakes: Their Value to the
State" (illustrated), in placetof Li-
brarian W. W. Bishop, who was to
have spokep on "Large Library Build-
ings: An American Contribution to
Architectire" (illustrated).
E. H. KRAUS,
Dean of the Summer Session.
Gun and Blade Club Meeting
The regular weekly meeting of the
Gun and Blade club will be held at
7:30 o'clock tonight in groom 318 of
the Union. It is urgent that all mem-
bers be present, as important t usiness
will be discussed. The meeting will
adjourn in time for the Spotlight.
All Federal board melt are cordially
invited to attend.
JAMES. C. STEVENS,
Secretary.

POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE
METHOD, PUFFER'S TOPIC1
(Continued from Page One)
"Then the child should continue to
do things at home. He or she should
darn stockings in everysense of the
word. At. this school the children
voted unanimously that school be con--
tinued through the summer," said
Mr. Puffer. "When you have to
drive the children out of the school,
you have a good school.. Pick out the
subjects which the children like.
Suggestion, Not Violence
"The positive parent is one who tells
his children what to do rather as a
suggestion than by the more custom-
ary violent means. It will take us a
hundred years to learn this tactful-
ness and knowledge of the child
mind," said Mr. Puffer.
"Nine-tenths of the boys in colleges
receive their first sex-instruction at
the age of nine and a half, from lis-
tening to nasty stories. They don't
hear the truth of the matter until they
are fifteen and a half, six years too
late," he said. "If this matter were1
handled rightly it would have more

good influence than all the books in
the world. The child should be in-
structed in sex matters as soon as he
evinces interest in them.
"It is a fierce proposition, and yet
they go on telling nasty stories until
a clean boy is looked on as a sissy.
We must try to get our ideals across
by the positive method, and the
method will take a hundred years to
learn. Ninety percent of our mothers
were pure, but girls nowadays have
.taken a bad slide."
Mr. Puffer then showed a series of
posters which were to be used in the
schools for the education of the chil-
dren. An appropriate picture with
such slogans as "Brush your teeth,
the body is the mind's house, -
keep it clean!" For the girls there
were such slogans as ,"Paint your
cheeks from the inside", and "Able
girls help mothers at home"-
PUFFER TELLS OF BOY
PROBLEM WEDNESDAY
(Continued from Page One)
any better way than this?" he asked.
"The games which the children play
nowadays are of absolutely no use in
later life," he said. "They should be
taught to play handball, volley ball
and cricket. People past the ages of

football and baseball are playing these
games.
"After we have thus disposed of all
the children's time during the week,
Sunday is still left. I recommend
three hours of Sunday school every
Sunday. This religious training is
very important. In the afternoon the
children should go out, under the care
of some responsible person," said
Mr. Puffer.
ENROLL WENT THIS SUIIDVER 50
PER CENT GREATER THAN LAST
The first Summer session of the
new School of Education has an en-
rollment 50 per cent greater than any
previous session, material evidence of
the appreciation for the new courses,
on the part of the school teachers.
Last summer there were 458 stu-
dents enrolled, 126 of whom were.
graduate students; this summer
there is an enrollment of 730, of
whom 283 are graduate students.
Friday on Business Trip in East
Prof. David Friday left the early
part of the' week for New York and
Washington on a business trip.
Subscribe to the Wolverine. $.75
for the rest of the Summer.-Adv.

U ,.

SECOND-

HAND

BOOKS

FOR ALL DEP ARTMENTS
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS will find the Right Prices at

w

A

H

R

UUNIVERSITY
BOOK STORES

I

The

EST. 1857

South lain Street
at Liberty

Shopping+ Center

Subscribe to the Wolverine.
for the rest of the Summer.-Adv.

$.75

SITE SWAN LAUNDRY

'i

FOR QUALI"TY

AND S'ERVIOF

anGoing _
ICanoeing?

FinishingTouches
Leather belts to wear with sleeveless or long
waisted frocks, in several leathers, black,
white, tan or grey, with pearl buckles, some
of white with black stripes, and some with
fancy stitching, priced from 39c to $r.50
Beads! Gay colored strings of graduated
sizes, or clever shaped beads all of one. size
in stunning black or cherry blue, or most
any color you could wish, some strung on
gold and some on silver chains. Priced from
5oc to $7.50 a string.4

Week-End Sale of
Toilet Articles

$I50 removable hair brushes for 98c each.
.50 Stillman freckle cream, 25c
.35 Blaud fablets for 26c.
.5o Bayer's aspirin, 24 tablets in a box, 39c
.go Mack & Co. liquid tar soap for 39C
.25 Mavis after shaving talcum powder,i9..
.75 Mack & Co. face powder, all shades 59c
All bandage gauze at one-half price.
All bottled perfume at one-half price.
Medium sized sponges at one-half price.

d;

Take along a
eighty
Canoe Lunch
7

}

Main- Floor

and machinery dre up-to-date in every detail. The result is better vyork
ir to the fabric. we cater especially to the student trade. One day service
TRY US.

Phone,

15933-anid

PHONE 165 ,

A. A. Gray

111:111tll11111111D111:t1111111il 11111111111111(11h"111111111Ipilis
:edal Cots $4.50, Camp Chairs, Tables, Water and c
igs, Army Blankets, Hip Rubber Boots, Ponchos,
Compasses, Canteens, Mess Cans, Knap Sacks,
led Dishes, Camp Stoves, etc.
S All kinds, Reg. Wall, Auto-Touro, Child-
ren's Play, Pup,and

it will be ready

Verra, Verra New
Verra verra new and a bit friv'lous is a colored linen hankie to match your frock, perhaps a gay
pink, a cool green, or a baby blue to go with your eyes. Any way you may have several, they're
just 2oc each- and are guaranteed all linen, too.
Main Floor

These

HotNoons
Try our salads,
sandwiches and

Dainty 'Lingerie

Army Mosquito Tents

ng, and Riding Breeches
For Men and Women
ent in Khaki,, Whipcord. Corduroy, Serge,
, Sport Suits, O. D. Khaki and Ponge
t Hose, Shoes, etc. Ladies Khaki Outing
)n knee and pockets at $3.85, others priced
iddy Blouses, Trousers and Hats
suits at greatly reduced prices-

sundaes for
refreshing
lunch
We aim to
serve you,
better

a

hlloomers
Silk mull bloomers, pink
satisfactory wear, price

or white, made of firm material and cut to fit, guaranteed to give
- - - - - $2.98

Peach Bloom Gowns

The very most stunning gowns of Peach Bloom crepe
mean pleasant dreams, price - - - - -
Pink Satin Petticoats
Petticoats for wear under filmy frocks, made of satin

featherstitched in orchid, gowns that
-. - - - - - $2.10

709 N. University

and lined with muslin that they may
- - . - - $3.95

be shadow proof, price

- - - -

(Second Floor)

4

SfORE- 213 N, 4th Ave.

0

IIIII1il IIIIlIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllr 1 -

H T

Summer

HILL AUDITORIUM

Tickets50

ON SALE AT

I

It

THE COOLEST PLACE I GR

IN

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