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June 28, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-28

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AT YOUR~
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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 28, 1921

PRICE

r t ;

AND STUDENTS
IR HIGR PRICES
ITE STREET FIRMS

TAG DAY SUCCESSFUL IN RAISING
FUNDS FOR-COMPLETION OF WORK
OF UNIVERSITY FRESH AIR CAMP

UNION SUMMER SPOTLIGHT HE fBPEETTINTNG~
ACTS, OFIE YCAMPUS A

Iu

JTROIT
Y LOWER

Be

PURDUE PRESIDENT DIES
Banff, Alberta, July 28.-Dr.
W. E. Stone, president of Purdue
university, at Lafayette, Ind.,
gave his ilfe in in the solitary
fastness of Mount Eanon .in an
effort, to save his wife, who had
fallen to a narrow ledge on the
face of a deep crevice. With Mrs.
Stone in his arms, he was at-
- tempting' to scale the almost
s perpendicular side of the cliff
r when he 'lost his footing and
hurtled to the bottom of the
f chasm.
d+ Mrs. Stone, who slid back to
her former position far above the
_ body of her husband, will recov-
er 'from the injuries and the ef-
fects of being viritually witho'ut
fod for eight days and nights,
according to fragmentary reports
reaching here from the rescuing
party.
SWELLR SIES, LECTURE
ON CANCER PHRENTION,
DISEASE 'ITSELF NOT DIRECTLY
INHERITABLE, SAYS
PROFESSORr
"Practical Points, in the Prevention

More than $300 was raised in seven
hours during the University of Mich-
igan Fresh Air Camp Tag day, held
on the campus Wednesday, . This is
practically enough to insure the suc-
'cgssful establishment and operation'
of the third section of the camp for
boys, the second division of which is
now urier way on the shores of Lake
Huron, eight miles north of Porte
Huron, Mich. -
The committee which took chgrge of
the work was composed of 40 stu-
dents, of whom 35 were, women, tin-
der the direction of Floyd A. Ser-
geant, '22, chairman of the Tag day
committee.
Total Fund $2,605.45
So far, the total amount of the
camp fund, exclusive of yesterday's
deceipts, is $2,605.45. The expendi-
tures of the first section were
$2,191.48. This included the purchase
of equipment, which had to be secured
complete, as well as transportation,
and operation.

Of the balance of $413.97, the sum
of $159 is held as a trust fund with
which to purchase a permanent. camp
site. According to Louis C. Reimain,
'16, camp director, it will take near-
ly all of the remaining $254.97 to com-
plete the second section, now sunder
way.
Need Entire Amount
In speaking of yesterday's cam-
paign, Lloyd M. Wallick, associate sec-
retary of the Students' Christian as-
sociation, said Wednesday night,
"The statement was made to me this
morning, by a man who ought to
know, that he understood sufficient
money to be already on hand to run
the third camp. This, however, is
not the case. Every bit of the money.
we took in today will be required to
conduct the last se-ction."
It is probable that an effort will be
made to secure some additional pri-
vate contributions in order .to make
the successful completion of the
camp doublyt certain.

In order to secure a definite
statement of opinion as to wheth-
er or not the prices-charged by
local soda dealers are reason-
able and just, The Wolverine is
publishing a ballot form on pageI
four of this issue. It has been
suggested that, if everyone who
is in the habit of patronizing
campus confectiohery shops,
would 'fill o'ut and mail their
ballot to the editor, it would be
possible to judge more definitely
just what the attitude of the stu-
dents, faculty, and towns people
is regarding loyal rates.
Everyone interested is asked to
co-operate. No ballots which are
sent in unsigned, or signed with
fictitious names, however, will be
considered.
Visitors"m Program
Drawes Big Crowd

FILL OUT THE BALLOT

KEEP CHEN AT WORK A ND THEY
WILL- STAY STRAGlHT, SAYS PUF[FER

COMPLETED PR
ER THAN
' PLAI

Charges Too Much "Bluffing"
"Getting By" in Schools
of Today

andj

-C.

d Gure of Cancer" was the subject
a lecture delivered by Prof. Carl

dealers is D. Weller, of the pathology depart-
stified. The ment of the Medical school, at 8
andoubtedly o'clock Tuesday night, in Natural Sci-
day I went ence auditorium. He distinguished
two otherditnuse
the dealer between the prevention of deaths
eam sodas. from cancer, and the actual previn-
we all re tion of cancer.
high, that "Cancer seems especially to be a
re for 11 disease of the middle-aged," he said.
f the stu- "It is 'not directly inheritable, al-
olicy of re- though a predisposition for it is pass-
ealers who ed a long.This does not mean sure
Four) death, merely a tendency to getting
it. Immediate operation is the cure."
Cancer is seen most in people whose
cent ages are between 56 and 60; seldom,
,~ before 40, and seldom after 60..
Night Cancer may often be prevented byY
removing the irritation which causes
it. For instance, in the old days
sually good when the method of cleaning chim-
offered at neys was to drop small boys downf
last night' them, these children developed can-
cer from contact with the' soot. With
organistthe passing' of this kind of chimney
. of Music, sweep came the passing of chimney-
ranged sel- sweep cancer. In the same way can-
which con- cer is found among workers in tar pa=
all types-of per factorie$ and paraffin works, and
ted his part precautions are taken against -the
Inished and coming of the dread disease.
"Cancer of the tongue is frequently
also of the 'due to broken teeth," said Professor
,ppeared in Weller, "on account of propensity of
ngs, which the tongue to search out these broken
er audience places. Cancer of the 'lip occurs
nal number chiefly among smokers, particularly
an encore. pipe 'smokers. A small incision, if
Ann Arbor made in time, will prevent the
spreading of the disease."
g's concert The method of preventing death is
ily Mutter, by immediat4 excision of the little
ars, poised cancer sore, as soon as its appear-
equipments ance is made. If allowed to go en
m the large very long, the cancer gets into the
three times lymph and blood channels and spreads

PUPILS NEED OUTDOOR LIFE
AND LESSONS IN TEA1M. WORK
"Positive and Negative Methods of
Educating Children" was the topic
which Mr.' J. A. Puffer expounded at 5
o'clock Tuesday afternoon in his lec-
ture on "The Growth of Child Welfare
and the Value of-Pictorial Material in
Arousing, Public Interest." It is his
belief that the best way to keep chil-
dren on the paths of righteousness is
to keep them at work.
"Idle time is the cause of most of
the evil in the world," he said. "We
tan't increase the number of hours
children must sit in seats, they sit
there too long already. But school is
better than nothing, although the
teacher has to teach the stupidest'
member of the class, and so the
brighter students suffer. There is too
much bluffing and getting by in our
schools today. How sad it is to meet
these boys - capable boys just bluf-
fing their way through school."
Positive Method
There is : a positive ,method for
teaching children, however, which is
'far better. At the present time the
teachers of most schools punish the
student if he does not know his les-
sons - the negative method. In the
experimental school operated by the.
University of Missouri, the positive
method is used. The things which the
children like to do are picked out,1
and the children are taught to do
them better.: "All the good and
wholesome. things that they do are1
seized upon," he said. "It is impor'-
tant to train their powers of observa-
tion. They should be taken out in
the country so that they can' catch the
disease of nature, and learn to delight
in it.
'"Get them out of doors. Teach them
the necessity for teamwork," said
Mr. Puffer, and went on to say that
we must get over the curse of one-
team Work in the United States, and
get everyone out. "The fundamental
virtues of Democracy are to be foundl
in teamwork.
Use Story-Tellhig Instinct
"In the afternoon the story-telling
instinct should be aroused. I think
this to be a great asset. Nowadays you
cannot tell a good story in 'a hotel
lest a man swing a nasty story back
at you. The best thing about your
college course is meeting men and
listening to their conversation.
(Continued on Page Four)

Problem of Delinquency Further Com-
pilcated by Number of
Feeble-Minded
ATHLETICS NEEDED TO
STOP STREET-LOITERING
Continuing on the theme that the
best thing for boys is to keep them
at work, Mr.. J. A. Ppuffer spoke for
the third time before Summer session
audiences at 5 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon, in the Natural Science aud-
itorium on the subject "The Boy Prob-
lemand the Prevention of Delinqu-,
ency."
He spoke of the large 'number of
feeble-minded people in the country.
"If we take 3,000,000 as the popula-
tion, there are 60,000 feeble-minded
people, taking 2 percent as the per-
centage, which is a low one," he said.
"There must be three children in
every family if that family is to keep
alive. Harvard graduates run 1.4 to
the family, Vassar graduates 1.0. This
is so fpr all universities. The death
rate for old Anglo--Saxon families in
New England is higher than the birth
rate. On the other hand, feeble-
minded families have as many as six
children. Something must be done
about this.
The Home the Cause
"The home is the cause of more de-
linquents than any other single fac-
tor.' I have known at least a hundred
delinquent boys, and have never seen
one who has not said that his home
had much to do wits his going wrong,"
said Mr. Puffer, and went on to say,
that a third of the honmesare ineffi-
cient in that they set up the wrong
examples for their children."
"We must build institutions which
will keep the children off the
streets. The danger time. is after the
school closes, the evenings,. Satur-
days, and Sundays.. In Utah the chil-
dren must either be in school or at
work all the time," said Mr. Puffer.
"All you have to know is the number
of boys and girls who annually go
wrong to believe that these- steps
should be taken."
Physical Training Necessary
The amount of physical training in
the schools should be increased. "I'd'
like to see 10 minutes of setting-up
exercises between each class," he
said. This has been done in Par-
kersburg,West Virginia. The children
meet in a big main hall between each
class. Why nod have at least an hour's.
physicaktraining every day, out in the
open air, in which there is teamwork
with everybody on the team. Is there
(Continued on Page 'Four)

(By L. W. Millard)
Special Correspondent'
Camp Davis. July 28. -.Visitors'
day, wlich was held Saturday, was a
huge success. The crowd began to,
gather at 10' o'clock'in the morning,
and by 1 o'clock a large congregation
had ,assembled., The following pro-
gram was carried out:
10:00, Parade; 10:30, welcome;
10:45, ball game; 12:00, dinner; 1:15,
vaudeville show; 2:00, aquatic meet;
3:30, field meet; 4:30, singing.,
The ball game between the winning
team of each league was not nearly
so contested for as was expected. The.
"mighty" Inwars of the Gurly league
won the championship easily by a.
10 to 2 score.
The afternoon was full- of excite-
ment for everyone. The vaudeville'
show proved to be a huge success and
the water events were interesting.
On a whole the day was a busy one
and eferyone enjoyed it. Many of the
visitors commented favorably about
the time they had and were well
pleased with the 'general appearance
of the camp.
Reen~st 'Pictres
In New Exhibit
An exhibit affording comparisons
between the contemporary French'
and British schools of painting will be
in the west gallery of Alumni Memo-
rial hall for the remainder of the
summer. This is -the Todd loan ex-
hibit, consisting of recent acquisitions
from last year's Paris Salon and the
Royl Academy.
The whole gamut of subject matter
is to be found in these paintings and
copies of famous artists. Prof. H. R.
Cross of the fine arts department men-
tions as being particularly note-
worthy: "Those who have now no
home", by Ruffin; "Spring in olden
times", by Sourel: "First Rays", by
Ponchin; "Canterbury Cathedral", by
Murray; "Garden of Hesperides", by.
Gervais; "Telephone Hut", a gold
medal picture, by Pouzargnes; "Sum-
mer Moon", by Olsson; "Cathedral of
Rouen", by Rigaud; and- "Shadows of
Hunger", by Young.
A great many worth-while examples
of oriental manuscripts are to be
found in the corridors on the second
floor. This collection contains a num-
ber of rare and beautifully illustrat-
ed Persian manuscripts.

ARRANGEMENTS MA
' TO COOL AUDITO
Demonstration of Powers of
tism Is Feature of Per
formnance
With the announcemen't of
changes in the orde/ of acts
Union Summer Spotlight and th
ination of the last act on the pr
all arrangements were. complet
night by the committee in cha
readiness for the 'entertainme
o'clock tonight in Hill audil
The program as now arranged'
somewhat shorter than originall
ned, with as well rounded a
acts as have been presented to
pus audience for some time, acc
4to Frank McPhail, '21, general
man.
Clardy Leads Prgram
K. Clardy, '23, will lead off tl
gram with a short skit involving
sleight of hand and juggling
He 'will be followed by Max J1
Grad., in a dramatic shit e
"The Two Vagabonds." The
vagabond, a vagrant hound, do
appear, but Jaslow's dramatic
not hindered by this limitation, a
ing to the committee. He will
companied by a student orc'hstr
posed of a piano, 'cello, and vi
The third acts will be offer
Howard Ramsey, '21E, whose
sonations and .Scotch monologu
well known to. student audience
- - Deebach Hypnotizes
The feature act of the vaude'
that given by Robert Deebach
whose powers of hyynotism 's
The audience at the Fall Spotlig]
year. He has appeared a num
times on -the professional vad
stage, and has worked out a nuni
new stunts to make his subject
form.
Robert Dieterle, '24M, will gi
fifth act, as previously announce
has -appeared at several campus
tainments and his tenor solos hs
ways met with favor. Two Ha"
students, K. Tang and Cyrus Ta
who will accompany him,wil1 a
in the final skit of the evening,
ing a number of native and p
pieces on the mandolin ukelel
steel guitar.
Cooling Arrangements
- The last act, given by McKi
orchestra, has been eliminated
the program.
A special feature of the vau
this year will be the arrangemei
cooling Hill auditorium. The bt
is opened at night, thoroughly (
and will not be opened till a fe;
utes before the performance be
F Tickets for the Spotlight we:
on sale on the campus and al
ham's and ,Wahr's bookstores 3
day. The sale' will be continu
tonight and tickets can be pur
at the doors of the auditorium 1
lately before the show.'

some use in curing
it is always consider-
immediate .excision.
s good and bad flesh
must be used in just
ty and in the hands
man or it does more

DELIVERY
Subscribers of The
who are not receiving
per regularly on
Thursday, and Saturd,
noons, or who have
against the delivery,
quested to call the bu
fice, telephone 960.

w

IN HILL

THE MICHIGAN UNION

THE COOLI

LUM

SUMME

R SPOTLIGHT

PL

l( f11 .

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