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June 26, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JUUb.
OF

UINNE,
ARBGR,. DIES;

embers of previous
ill be that of Rob-
who will sing a
>wn songs and will
y a Hawaiian or-

ril The program will be opened by
2?, Howard Ramsay, '21E, in a Scotch
ng, monologue. His impersonations, par-
en ticularly of Harry Lauder, have al-
al-, ways been well received in campus
eir entertainments.
of The second act will be that of Max
by Jaslowv, whose dramatic skit will be
accompanied bla Margaret Gratton,
'24, Leila Jackson, '20, and 'Oswalo
Schaefer, S. 6f M., the orchestra being
tee composed of a cello, piano, and vio-
irn. ,
The third act, which will be an'in-
t novation for student audiences, will
et consist of a duet by K. Tang and C.
er-Tavares, two native Hawaiians, play
ing the mandolin ukelele and steel
guitar. They have never yet appeared
in campus entertainments but, ac-
' cording to the conimittee, have a skit
of unusual effectiveness.
Lde S. Clardy, '22, will give a sleight cf
nic hand performance, similar to those
in's that he has given before a number -of
soldier audiences in France during the
war.
- McKinley's orchestra will conclude
the program with some dance music.
ty,
ml Yesterday 's Scores
the
ve- American League
om No games scheduled.
National League
Pittsburgh 6, New York 3.
No other games scheduled.

INE

WAS MICHIGAN GRADUATE AND
FORMER CIRCUIT COURT
HEAD
After 78 years of active life, during
30 of which he presided over the
Washtenaw circuit court, former Judge
Edward D. Kinne, '64, of Ann Arbor,
died here Monday afternoon follow-
ing a long illness. He had lived in
Ann Arbor -51 years.
During his long career of judicial
service, Judge Kinne was recognized
as one of the foremost legal authorities
in the state of Michigan.
Shortly after his retirement from the
bench four years ago, his health began
to fail. Last spring, while in New
York, he suffered a recurrence of
heart trouble, with which he had been
afflicted for some time,'and rallied
only sufficiently to permit his being
brought home about a month ago.
- For many years Judge Kinne was
president of the First National bank
here. He was also a member and
vestryman of St. Andrew's Episcopal
church.
Judge Kinne is survived by his wid-
ow, Winnefred Morse Kinne, and one
daughter, Mrs. LeClair Martin, of
Cedar Falls, Ia.
Announcement of the funeral ar-
rangements is being withheld pending
the arrival of Mrs. Martin.
T. LovellEsq.uiS
Honor Saturday
With appropriate ceremonial solem-
nity, the degree of A. W. 0. L. (Am-
erica's Writer of Liberty), was confer-
red upon Dr. Thomas Lovell, lieu-
tenant colonel of archery, Saturday
evening- at Naylor's grove, on the oc-
casion of'the annual picnic of the Gun
and Blade club, campus organization
for federal board students.
The address, which preceded the
presentation of the sheep skin and the
conferring of the degree, was delivered
by Carl H. Smith, '23, and ran is part
as follows: *
"In. the winter of '18, ,the dark and
devastating clouds of war cast their
Stygian shadows over the brave boys
of the S. A. T. C., and doubt and gloom
began to penetrate the very marrow
of their souls. Cold and hunger
clutched them in its clinging, clammy
clasp, and pestilence, disease and
death, the children of the fiend, stalked
throughout the campus, laying low the
flower of our knighthood.
"As Moses of old, insjhred by the
Lord, appeared in the hour of deep-
est gloom and discouragement to lead
his people out of the blackness of
night and despair to the promised land
of sunshine and peace, so there ap-
peared on the campus of .Ann Arbor
a figure, humble, yet great in his hum-
ility, a.man destined to lead our sold-
eirs from the slough of despair to the
mountain top of optimism. Tireless
and unwearingly, he labored among
them,'a peg here, a stitch here, build-
ing up the run ,down heels, strength-
ening and renewing their battered
soles; and when they were literally
upon their uppers, and their tonguies
were hanging out, he placed them
upon their feet again."
LOCAL DRUGGIST
GUTS SODA PRICE

PLAN TO RAISE FUNDS
FOR FRESH AIR CAMP
(Continued from Page One)
brings one closer to nature and the
great outdoors. -
"It teaches a boy what clean living
really is and what it means to him.
Nothing in the world can surpass a
a period of camp life ,to lift
a boy put of a hole and set him on his
feet again. It teaches him manliness,
courteousness, unselfishness, and in
fact it gives him a better idea of what
his future life means to him.
"The games we have here teach htm
true sportsmanship, winning or los-
ing. The counsellors give a boy a lift
and are ready to give him information'
whenever it is asked for. They are
doiitg their best to make this camp an
overwhelming success.
"Camp life brings out good and bad
points pf a boy which may be correst-
ed whenever necessary . and thus
teaches him to lead a good, lean,
wholesome life. It is my opinion that
every boy should be given a chance to
spend some time in such a camp as
this.
"With many thanks to all those who
have done their best to make and
back this camp, I sign my name,
"OSMAN PETROS."
At the close of the first section, a
vote was taken among all the boys to
determine who was the most pobular
lad in camp. The little Greek was
the one chosen to receive the modest
prize offered.j
Osman's father and mother deserted
him sometime ago, leaving him with
an elder brother. The brother was too
busy to look after the youngster, so
he never' attended school. "I lived
around idle so long my fingers grew
itchy," said the boy in explainint why,
he had been before the juvenile cour t
for a larceny charge. The court de-
tained him' in the detention home as a
trusty, and he will remain in camp un-
til a new home is found for him.
The lad is said to have a wonder-
ful memory and is a voracious reader.
One of the counsellors, feeling that
the influence of the Univer'sity men
had broukht out the really fine points
in his character, expressed a 'wish to
adopt him.

Three other boys besides Osman at
the first camp were also trusties in

1
1

the detention home of the juvenileo
court in Detroit.b
A meeting of the committee whichc
will handle the campaign on the cam-
pus tomorrow will be held at 8 o'clocke
tonight in Lane hall."
PUFFER TALKS ON ]
BOY DELINQUENCY
(Continued from Page -One)
The trouble with the courts is that
they are not constructive enough, he]
said. Business wields a bad influence
in that advertising has convinced
people that they cannot do without a
cigar or cigarette.
"The newspapers are'yellow sheets.
Two-thirds of the stuff they print
should never be allowed to get into
the papers. This condition. is so badC
that a jury not unlike that of the
Supreme court to censor rigidly what
shall or shall not go in the papers hasz
been thought of. It is high time that.
we do something about this source of
corruption.I
"The billiard hall is an institutiont
licensed by the community, and yetl
it pushes every man who associates1
with, it downhill. It is not because thes
game is bad, it is a good one, but the
atmosphere of swearing, gambling
and dirty story telling, which makes
up a part of the billiard hall is ant
evil influence. Here we are actually
tolerating all these things when they-
actually produce evils - wreckc
homes." ,,
Speaking of dance halls he said,
"Dance halls have gone down hill
so fast in the last 10 years that Ir
believe people are just blind to con-t
ditions. More girls are pushed into
vice ,by way of the dance hall floors
than through any other institution."
Bodily contact dancing he character-f
ized as not being safe for the adoles-
cent youth. "The dollar controls the
business today," he said.C
"I believe two things about the
movies. I believe that the movies,
when boys and girls can go two or
three times a week, have as much in-
fluence as the combined influence of
tie schools and churches. I believe
also, that the movies' vicious sugges-'
tions, their dangerous and careless
methods are having as much effect in

They are allc
support active 1i
man, it is esti
calories per day,
about 4,000. TI
after personal in
needs of the ind
'to provide a
bine quantity, v
tle protein, and
be palatable, w,
problems that c
sity physicians.

lots
s on(

They h

toes ha
salad c
added
cream,
yolks, 8
The :

utter, oli
I crean
ds have

No tv
treati

have

One of the temp
case follows:
Breakfast: Twc
egg, coffee, with
_cream, and broth.
Dinner: About
of steak, small cul
slice of bacon, fli

one. is unarie naplh
breaking stunt a good it
child's mind,?"
"We must get a constri
of handling these thing
"Welfare / associations
formed in many cities
pose, under superinte
must of necessity be me
ty. If co-operation be
the men's or women's cl,
dom will co-operate."
DIABETES '*CU:
VALUABI

PRODUCT

SEND A KID

I

1 w wwlr rYl ll n i I I I r . ri1 l!" I w n.^ + / ..
.. 3,

assurance

V

ASANR BEST
(INC.)
RANbOLPH AND WABASH

READY TO
SHOES.
DOMESTIC
HATS

200 S.
4th Ave

CHICAGO

/

4

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT

"I

-

, f

MEN'S

FINE

I

cpairing

N E C K W E'A R
Ideal for Summer Wear
OXFORD CRE PE
The tie that will not wrinkle
or show pin marks.
In a smart new shape and a large
assortment of handsome colorings

LI

I

Very Special at

- - - - Y.

$1.oo each'

r

ng

1M4

(Continued from Page One)
almost 25' per cent larger than that
previously used. Also, the flavorings
served in both sodas and ,sundaes at
the better fountains cost more than
the old fashioned artifically colored
syrups. There is little hope that a
good sized dish of ice cream will ever
be served for less than 10 cents."
A comparison of the rates of'State
street, outside of Sugden's, with Union
prices shows thetap-room to have a
margin in its favor, the prices of the
Union in almost every case being a
trifle under those of the regular State
street dealers.
"Cokes" Price Split
Coca Cola at the Union is 5 cents
for an 8 ounce glas . while State
street stores in this clas ask 10 cents
for 'a glass of the same size. Lemon-
ade 4t the Union is 15 cents; State
street 17 to 20 cents. Union malted
milks are 20 cents; State street asks
22 to 25 cents. Union plain sundaes
are 10 cenf; State street'17 to 20
cents. Fruit sundaes at the Union
are 15 gents; on State street they are
from 22 to 25 cents. Union strictly
fruit sodas are the same as State
street.

t

3O8 S. STATE STREET
Abe l imer 's College Inn

4

S E C ON D

-HA N D BO OK

FOR ALL -, EPAKRTMENT$
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS will find the Right Prices at

W

A H

R

S UNIVER
BOOK ST

s

Have You

Tried Our
HOME COOKING

Silver and Gold
Pencils
ALARM
-. -

ATERMAN, 4
SWAN

L VLI

EET'

__Y

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