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June 26, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-26

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lu It~

AT YOUR
THREE T

A WEEK

I

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 26, 1921.

PRICEFI

S RETURN
FALLS TRIP

The 54 members of the excursion
f 1 party to Niagara Falls, under the di-
T rection of Prof. I. D. Scott and Prof.
K. C. McMurry, Af the geology de-
partment, returned Monday morning
to Ann Arbor.
The members of the party left Ann
ON Arbor Friday afternoon and went to
Detroit via the Michigan Central. At
Detroit they immediately caught the
boat for Buffalo and arrived there
Saturday morning. A special car then
-RS took the tourists to the Falls.
Saturday morning they took the
gorge route ride and in the evening
of they received special permission to
visit Goat Island. On Sunday the
party was taken on sight-seeing tips.
At 4 o'clock that afternoon the party
I to left for Buffalo, where they boarded
Om- the boat for Detroit.
the A similar'trip, under the same direc-
pre- tion, will be made to Put-in-bay. The
cent date for this excursion will be an-
nounced later.
for ________
we
for AN NOU NOLSE.EN
for
the
Of SPOTLI6HT ACTS

HOW TO -PREVEN
GOOD RESTRAINTS CLASSIFIED
IN SPEECH, VALUE OF COURTS
AND GOVERNMENT DUBIOUS

INFLUENCES DIVIDED
INTO THREE GROUPS
Newspapers, Billiard Halls, Dance
Halls and Movies Are Flayed
by Speaker
"How can we co-operate to prevent
boyhood delinquency?" was the ques-
tion which J. A. Puffer, of New York
city, answered in his lecture, "Com-
munity Co-olperation for Child Wel-
fare", delivered at 5 o'clock yester-
day afternoon in the Natural Science
auditorium.,
He -enumerated the many factors
which tend for good or evil influence
upon the plastic mind of the young
boy. Constructive organizations in-
cluded the home, 'the s hocjl, lthe
church, good books, men's and wom-
en's clubs, and fraternal organiza-
tions. Cl4ssed as dubious influences
were the government, the courts, and
business; while'destructive elements
are the newspapers, the billiard
halls, dance halls, and, worst of all,
the fovies.
Dumped on Schools
The homes, he said, were prone to
dump their children on the schools,
thinking that their responsibility ends
there. "There needs to be a very nice'
co-operation between the homes and
the schools," he remarked. "The
church has not been all we have hoped
for, but it is waking up." He then
went on to say that 85 per cent of
the workers of the church come from'
the Sunday school, and that 70 cents
out of every dollar was expended on
,reaching to people who were al-
ready morally upright.

TENNIS TOURNEY
ENTRIES CLOSED
Entries in the campus tennistour-
nament to determine the Summer
school champion have been closed.
Play in the tournament will begin
inimediately on the Ferry field courts.
Drawings have been made, and the
following men are requested to play
off their matches for the preliminary
round as soon as possible.
After the matches have been play-
ed the winner should report to Moe's
sport shop and check up the results
on the big chart. No results will be
counted for men who have not paid
their entrance fee. The following
men were paired off in the draw-
ings: Clippert, 374, vs. Van Rooyen,
Rorick vs. Stevens, 1449-R, Smith,,
131, vs. Fox, 1466-M, Paper, 2186-J,
vs. Mildner, 1366, Goldberg, 2378-W,
vs. Block, 1324-J, Genebach vs. Fer-
nandei Olmacher, 856-W, vs. Coe,
117-J, Michind vs. Zook, 2576-W,
Shaw, 63, vs..Kelley, Watts, 63, vs. Ma-
rantay, Workman, 2738, vs. Abada,
Schwarfz, 1324-J, vs. Foster, 1328,
Jerome, 2280-M, vs. Andrus, 348-R,
Cooper, 1198-3, vs. Hubler, 1174.
In the doubles the drawings re-
sulted in the following pairings: 01-
macher and Zook vs. Rorich and Van
Rooyen, Michand and Prescott vs.
Stevens and Workman, ,Cohn and
Goldberg vs. Shaw and Watts,
Schwartz vs. Fox and Wickett.
YOUTHFUL ARTIST IS
CONCERTATTRACTION

, Il

ens Prograni; D eebach,
st, to Be Evening's
Feature
PROMISES
PPY ENTERTAINNEENT
list 'of the 'seven acts
mplete the program for
ummer Spotlight vaude-'
iven at 8 o'clock Thurs-
Hill auditorium, has been
the committee in charge,
z the announcement that
the entertainment have
ed. The program as now

ELEVEN-YEAR-OLD EMILY
TER WILL tAPPEAR ON
FACULTY SERIES

FUNDS NEEDED TO CONTINUE WORK
'OF FRESH AIR0 CAMP; COMMITT
PREPARES TO .SOLICIT STUD

MUT-

a shb

list is

ach, '23D, w
of hypnotis
last year.I
r of timesc
and will p
se that crea
his lasta
to Sing
will be bf

vho ex- Speaking of the clubs, he said that
m to a the Rotary club's movements . were
He has most significant. Their members are
on the studying problems that they may see
erform more clearly what they can do to bet-
ated so ter conditions. "Fraternal organiza-
appear- tions, on the' other hand, monopolize'
the time of the best people in initiat-
ing them, and so they have time for
partic- nothing else."
-) (Continued on' Page Four)

z Coaches Expregs Approval
f Scheme For Summer Athletics

July 26.-Both . G.
f athletics at the Uni-1
iois, and Carl Lund'
coach, have expressed
of the plan, recently
'he Wolverine, student
he Summer session of
of Michigan, of con-
llegiate contests, par-
ill, among the univer-
ve courses i-, athletic
g the summe.
trikes me as a good
uff. "The main draw-
time. In the regular
have 18 week periods,
rses in coaching last
so that a day is worth
resent term than it is
ular ygar.
le in Teaching
r hand such a project
luable in teaching the
e coaching school how
team.' They would be
d while the team was
d, and could see the
work in developing a
way they could learn
any other how to de-
ren said the idea was

an excellent one. "Summer sports be-
twen juniversities would take away
the monotony of the work," he said.
"It would also. increase the students'
interest in their work, so that they
could accomplish more.".
G. Huff said that if such a plan
were adopted, it would be necessary-
to have a separate section in athletic
coaching for those who wanted to
engage in such contests. At present
those studying baseball, for instance,
are gien practice in all the different'
positions, while if a team were or-
ganized to obtain best results it
would be necessary to have each man
specialize.
Easy to, Secure Team
"We wouldn't have any trouble in
securing a team," he said . "Were we
to adopt such a system we would have
enough men signed up to produce a
real team.
"The plan ought to increase inter-
est in school life amoig the whole
student body during the Summer ses-
sion. The students would all be in-
terested in the games and would
come to see them. As it is people;
flock to the baseball parks in the sum-
mer, and here we could give as good
games, together with displaying real
school loyalty."

Emily Mutter, an 11-year-old violin
pupil of Anthony J. Whitmire, of the
School of Music, will appear on the
next faculty concert program, to be
given at 8 o'clock tomorrow evening'
in Hill auditorium. The youthful
musician has appeared many times
throughout the state during the past
year, and is considered one of the
most promising pupils who has ever
entered the University School of Mu-
sic
Harry Russell Evans and Miss Nora
Crane Hunt, both of the School of
Music faculty, will also appear to-
morrow night.
The program to be given is as fol-
lows:
Pompand Circumstance.......Elgar
(Op. 39, No. 1)
A Song of Indi a.. Rimsky-Korsakow
Midsummer Caprice.........Johnston
Harry Russell Evans
Vieni che poi Serene.........Gluck
I Love 'Thee . ...........Beethoven
Hark, Hark! the Lark.......Schubert
Nora Crane h{unt
Adoration.............Borowski
.Sons of the Puszta.....Keler Bela
Emily Mutter
The Days Gone Bye ....Franco Leoni
Blessing...............Del Riego
Pat .................Linn Seiler
The Open Road.......Gertrude Ross
Miss Hunt
In Moonlight.... , . . . .Kinder.
Fanfare d'Orgue...........Shelley
Mr. Evans
MOTORAN EXONERATED
FOR DEATH OF VISITOR
Burt Owlett. the motorman of the
trolley car which killed Miss Cecelia
Boyarsky during Commencement week
has been completely eXonerated from
any blame, according to the verdict
which has just been issued by the
jury-
According to a statement given out
by Coroner Samuel Burchfield, Mon-,
day, Miss Boyarsky came to her death
through failure to look up and down
the track before she stepped in front
of the car.
SEND A KID TO CAMP!

SEEK TO ROUND UP
WHISKEY SMUGGLiRS
New York,. July 26.-Federal
authorities along the Atlantic
coast redoubled their vigilance
over tramp ships Monday fol-
lowing disclosure of evidence
indicating the existenc of at
least two gigantic international
whiskey smuggling rings, one
having headquarters in this
city and one in Atlantic City./
Aid of the navy department
is also being sought in an effort
to round up rum carrying ships.
PHYSICIANS FIND.
DIAB ESCR
New Diet Said to Eliminate Sifering
Through Undernourish.
ment
SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT
SHOWN IN RECENT CASES
If the histories of 150 cases of dia-
betes treated by the University hospit-
al physicians during the past three
years may be taken as any basis for
judgment, the riddle of the disease
which has baffled medical scientists
for many years, apparently is lending
itself' to solution.
Successful steps in halting its pro-
gress, and in some cases of, bringing
about a temporary cure, have been
taken at the department of internal
medicine here. Of all the 150 cases
treated, records show that none of
the diabetic patients who have care-
fully followed diet directions have
died from the disease.
500,000 Cases in U. S.
There are approximately 600,000
persons in the United States suffering
from the disease in an acute or mild
form, according to the most accurate
statistics. Medical authorities are un-
animous in declaring there is no hope
of saving them known except in the
strict observation of prescribed diets.
While diabetes was known in bibli-
cal times, it w'as not until the latter
part of (the nineteenth century that
enough was known of the nature o
the disease to start any rational treat-
ment.
Since that time there have been.
three important movements in the
treatment of diabetes. Studies of
chemists led to the belief that the dan-
gerous acid poisoning was due to the
use of fat in the -diet. For this reas-
on the diet was rectricted by the limit-
ation of fatty foods. This left the pa-
tient dependent chiefly on protein.
Such treatment was successful for
the' mild cases but failed in severe
cases. Later the realization that the
restriction of proteip would control
the severer cases led to the adoption
of a diet in which all food was great-
ly limited in amount resulting in the
starvation or under-nutrition of -the
patient. .

Opening Meeting Will Be Add
by "resident Burton
An opening assembly for-the
student body and the members
faculty and staff of the Univer
scheduled to be held the eveni
fore college opens, Monday, Se
in Hill auditorium. This ass
decided upon at the last conf
of the deans, is announced in
cent bulletin issued to the vario
ficers by President Marion L.
ton.
"The gathering," states Pre
Burton, in the bulletin, "should
sense be. confused with the r
official convocation to be held
It was the thought of the dea
the President that a gathering
as this would be of value to I
tire University at the opening
year, and, if properly con
might add very distinctly to the
of unity in the University as a
and might serve as a source
spiration for the work of thi
year.
"It was our thought that the
dent at this time should deli
appropriate message and tha
gathering should be intended nI
for the freshmen, but for the
student body and such memb
the faculty and staff as may
attend."
SEND A KID TO CAMP!

FIRST

SECURING OF $500 WILL EN
THIRD SECTION TO GO O:
WITH PROJECT
SECOND DIVISION
IS OPENED MONI
Boys and Counsellors Agree on
of Movement; Delinquents I
eluded in Outing
For the. purpose of raising :
with which to finance the thirlE a
of the University of Michigan
Air camp, eight miles north of
Huron on Lake Huron, a comu
with Floyd A. Sergeant, '22,- asc
man, has been appointed to o
tag day camliaign on the- camp
morrow.
Something over $500 is neede
the third section of the camp, at
division it is hoped that more
60 boys may be accommodated.
first took care of 33, and abu
same number are being given a
tion at the second section which
ed yesterday.
' Other Camps Filled
Other boys' camps, being cond
by the Detroit Free Press, the
tion Army, and the Community F
ation of Detroit, are all filled to c
ity and cannot handleany more
cants. It is s'aid that the offici-
charge of these camps are the
much pleased with the work
done by the University.
A good many of the boys being
care of at the University's Fres
camp are wards of juvenile c
One of these lads, Osman Petros,
tle 15-year-old Greek, coming fro
dete'tion home in Detroit, addr
a communication to the studen
the University to show his app
tion for the work done by the
section, which he attended. Thi
ter is as follows; ,
"I have profited greatly in n
days here. The stay out here dev
one physically and mentally. It 1
out your innermost disposition
(Continued on Page Four)

I

Excells All Others
Right here is where the new dietetic
treatment known as the low protein,
low carbonydrate and high fat diet,
discovered at the University hospital-,
excells all others. Through success-
ful experimentation on more that 100
persons physicians have disproven the
belief that fats are harmful to the bia-
betic. Without exception the patients
have gained normal health after being
put on the low protein, low carbohy-
drate and high fat diet.
(Continued on Page Four)

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