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June 23, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-23

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LV

RINE

I

ological tests have also been proven
of value in the determination of a
1S T S witness fitness to testify at a trial.
A picture is shown to the subject for
ne) perhaps a minute, and he is then
its own called upon to tell what le saw, and
tests, in what he would be prepared to swear
upon to that he saw.. In this way his accu-
ches de- racy and memory are fairly sized up.
ther fig- The newspaper reporter's journalistic
or quick- ability may be tried out in similar
so which fashion. -

.. ....w.. .

lacFadyen Of London Concludes
Stay Here With Sunday 's Sermon.

in theI

,t in which the
down the oppo-
s are the anal-
he student finds
thers given, and
which calls for

The first ,psychological laboratory
was loun ed in Germany, according
to Professor Whipple, but practical'
psychology first came into being when
Binet, the French psychologist, de-
vised a series pf tests for weeding out
those whose minds were inferior or
feeble. These Binet tests, as they,
were called, were the, precursors /of
the modern group tests.'

set, and grades are Educators Hold Get-Together
pints out of a per- The members of the, Men's Educa-
one who gets only tional club held a get-together of 97
red, is said to have men on Thursday. A ball game be-
and is literally a tween the superintendents and the
principals was featured. The contest
itness' Fitness ended after three innings, the super-
le says that psych- intend'ents leading that far.

'S CHURCH- SERVICES

Rev. Dugald MacFayden, of London,I
England, who with his sermon tomor-i
row will conclude his stay at theC
Methodist church here, is fulfilling in
part his ideal of helping to promote ai
better understanding between Great
Britain and America.'
He says, "The important thing is1
that both of the two nations have great
civilizations with many points in' com-
mon, and if there is to be, in the fu-
tvre, a great Anglo- axon ciilization,
the two must be united.into one, which
will contain the good points of both.
Each may learn a great deal by ob-
serving and becoming ,acquainted with
the other."
Don't Understand Each Other
In spite of their similarity of lang-
uage, customs, and ideals, Dr. Mac-
Fadyen thinks that he two sister na-
tions do not sufficiently understand
each other. "The trouble with most!
American conceptions of Great Brit-
ain," he said, "is that the majority of
Americans still think of Great Brit=
ain as it has been portrayed in their
history books, instead of- being, as
Theodore Roosevelt expressed it, 'the
greatest civilizing agency of the world'
today.'
"On the other hand,"* he continued,
"the Englioh are apt to be intolerant
of Amarican ideas because of their lack
of familiarity with American :life as
it actually ;Is, and not as it is often
burlesqued in England. Both these
difficulties can be remedied only by a
closer bond of sympathy and under-
standing between the peoples of the
two countries themselves.
Interested in Closer Union
"The main consideration, is that in
order to co-operate and work togeth-
er harmoniously on this and many
other questions common to both coun-
tries, each/must staudy and understand'
the civilization of the other." Dr. Mac-
Fayden is now much interested in
working out this ideal. The concrete
form which it takes at the present time
is In the activities of the council whicli
has lately been established in London
for' the interchange of preachers be-
tween England and America.
It is owing to the work of this coun-
cil that Dr. MacFadyen is addressing
congregations in America, not as a
special speaker, but as a minister. In
just. this, way Dr. Stalker, pastor' of
3.-

M IORE MONEY NEEDED TOI
CONTIUE CA-1MP WORK
(Continued from Page One)
boys all wish that they could give
these same kids a chance to stay all
summer. Unless more money is
raised, however, it is going to be im-
possible for the camp to continue as.
planned.

Corn

Rev. Van Evera, who has been in1
charge of mission work in thy vicin-
ity of Shanghai, China, since 1912,
will deliver the morning sermon at
the Presbyterian church tQiinorrow on
"Hopeful Aspects of the Work in' 7
China." Rev. Van Evera has for the
past year been on a leave of absence,#
and the greater part of this time he
has spent in taking post-graduate
work here at the University. He will
f'eturn to take u his world in China
at the end of Summer school.
In addition to giving the regular
sermon on Sunday, Mr. Van Evera will
address the Bible class at 11:30 on
"Opportunities for Work in China."
Fourth Union Service
The fourth of the Union services
will be held at 7:30 o'clock in front of
of the Library, at wlich time Rev. F.]
P. Arthur, of the Church of Christ,
Disciples, will speak on the subject,
"The Christian's Program." The music,
will be led as usual by George Oscar
Bowen.
A new speaker will be heard at the
Congregational church at the. regular
morning service at 11:30 o'clock. Dr.
Arie Brinkhorst, of the Chicago Theo-
logical seminary, will speak on "Chris-
tian Education." The music will be
given by a quartet choi'r directed by
Prof. Earl V. Moore, of the School of
Music.

the Methodist church here, is preach-
ing to the people of several English
congregations.
Dr. MacFadyen will speak here for
the last time tomorrow, and will leave'
for Canada, where he will preach in'
various cities before coming back
through New England.]
SUNDAY ERIN
ANN ABORHURCES

t
#
,

There are two more sections of
camp to be held, according to the
schedule. That would mean between
80 and 90 more boys in canmp so that
even when the necessary funds are
raised it would be possible to keep
only a few of the best Irst section
b>oys in camp. Efforts are now being
nade, however, to sarrange it so that
the four boys now here from the de-j
tention home in Detroit will be al-
lowed -to remain through another sec-
tion. Camp life means much to these
,youngsters.
Haver.eld Down Expenses
Close figuring brings the amount
necessary to complete the camp ac-
cording to plans, down to $500. Louis,
C. Reimann, '16, head counhellor, has
done everything possible to reduce ex-
penses to a minimum, and ye~t give
the boys both proper nourishment and'
the necessary living equipment. Many"
donations of 'food and other supplies
have been received, which fact pas
also made it possible to cut 'expenses.
NUMEROUS CHANGES MADE
IN NEXT WEEK'S PROGRAM

Editor, The Wolverine:
I must call to your attention and
ask for a correction of the statement,
appearing in Thursday's issue of The
Wolverine, attributed to me, in regard
to the prices of soda water and ice
cream.
Our price for sodas and sundaes is
15 cents plus war tax of 10 per cent,
except in the case of fresh and crush-
ed truit items. The above prices our
menues plainly indicate.
Thanking you for your attention
to this, I am,
Your's truly,
G. M. FLETCHER,
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Company.

Critique

4

T
'HIRC-H,
low State
MINISTE~R

.1

FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH,
or. State and Washington Sts.
l ev. Arthur W. Stalker, Pastor
Miss Ellen W. oore, Student
Director
SUNDAY, JULY 24, 1921
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Rev. Dugald MacFadyen, of
London, England, Preacher.
Subject: "The Ethics, of
Peace."
11:45 A. M. - Student Bible'
Class.
6:330 P. Ml. - Young People's
Devotional Meeting. Leader,
Mr. Henry Weiss. /Subject,
"The Chuych's Call For
Workers."
All Students especially Invited-

Worship.
Our Indi-

s for
is at
East
"The

.

?S C
iunion.
's Serv-
Prayer

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and 'Huron. Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister
JULY 24, 1921
10:30 A. M.
"UNITARIAN PRINCIPLES"
A brief account -of the history
'and principles of the Unitarian
Church, especially intended for
those who may be curious about
the same..

Way of

OFFICIAL NOTICES,
All notices fors this column should
be in tfhe hands of Oscar L. Buhr,
Assistant tothe President, by 9:3o
o'clock on the morning of each day
of issue, Tuesday, Thursday, and Sat-
urday.
The Women's Education club will
have a picnic Wednesday, July 27,
from 5-7:30 o'clock at Hillside Spring,
just beyond the island. All women
wishing to attend, who have not al-
ready signed, should leave their
names with Miss Cameron, School of
Education office, Tappan hall, by.
July 25.
EDITH SEEKEL, Pres.
A.

T. Webb,
Charge

"Let
men."

your light slime before
WELCOME

a,.

YTERIAN CHURCH

Mac Fadyen Concludes Stay
lkev. Dugald acFadyen, -of Lon-
don, England, will give his last ser-
mon before leaving Ann Arbor at the
Methodist church Sunday morning. His
subject will be "The Ethics of Peace."
The topic for the sermon at the
morning service at the First Baptist
church is "The Kingdom in Our In-
dividualistic Age," -"which will be de-
livered by the pastor, Rev. J. M. Wells.
At noon the Bible class for Summer
school students will be held at the
Baptist Guild house. The subject for
discussion is "The Messiah and the
Church."
At the Unitarian Church
Rev. Sidney ยง. Robins, pastor of the
Unitarian church, will speak at the
morning 'service on "Unitarian Prin-
ciples." This will be a brief account
of the history and principles of the
Unitarian church, intended for those
who do not understand what it is that
the Unitarian church stands for.
St. Andrew's Episcopal church will
hold its three regular morning serv-
ices. H{oly communion at 7:30. o'clock,
children's service at 9:30, and morn-
ing prayer and sermon at 11:30. "The
Way of the Master," is the subject of
the sermon which will.be givent by
Rev. Charles T. Webb, the minister in
charge.
LEADERS COME NATURALtY,,
NO1T MECHANICALLY-LLOYD
(Continued from Page One)
3. - "The obtrusive ipresence and
challenge of a new and strange en-
vironment which demands account-
ing, not by mere calculation and for-
mal reason, but instinctively."
4. "The homing instinct, sure to
assert itself and to come to under-
standing of Itself and its real im-
portance."
Leadership an Abstraction
"I take it that. great individual
leadership, like a common general in-
dividualism, truly is a good deal of an
abstraction, being more thinkable
than findable; in other words, having
a wider reach and deeper root than
the merely findable things of space
and time."

Ii

(Coptinued from Page One)
Cancer." Dr. Weller has been asso-,
ciated for some time with Prof. A. <S.
Warthin, who poke last Tuesday on
"The Nature o Cancer," and his lec-
ture will be an elaboration of the
possibilities for cure of the disease
that were mentioned by Dr. Warthin.
Concert Wednesday
The regular concert of the .School,
of Music faculty will be given at 8
o'clock Wednesday night in Hill audi-
torium. The subject of .the 'educa-
tional motion pictures, to be given
this week at 7' o'clock on Thursday
night, will be "Back to the Farm."
At 8 o'clock Thursday night the Sum-:
mer Spotlight of the Michigan Union
will be given in Hill auditorium.
DOWNTOWN STOREkEEPERS
CHARGE UNION SETS PRICES,
(Continued from Page One)
charges, adding that there is no ex-
cuse for this, unless. the firm is not
possessed of a refrigeration plant.
The Main street merchants are un-
der the impression that if the stu-
dents would not do business with the
high-priced stores, these shops would
have to come dow'n in price. One man
said, "A couple goes where the girl
wants to go, a'nd she never wants to
go to a cheap place."

(Continued from Page Three)
way, but perhaps somewhere between
"Main Street" and Zane Grey.
Up to this point iin the lively con-
versation I had been enjoying nayself
I had been quarreling pleasantly with
a newspaper critic or two, a young
lady artist just back from Europe.
.and an alert young lady from one of
the bookstores. At first I refused to put
any credence in the general belief, but
when the young Lady from the book-
store told me that the public was de-
manding the softer stuff I could no
longer doubt it, and I grew morose.
Things Don't Look So Black
But I don't think -that things look
so black. The crowd might be ex-
pected to swing back; the crowd will
never know anything about literature.
The nucleus of the movement will go
on expanding, slowly, safely, as it
has done in Europe. 'With men like
Farrar, De Casseres, Hammond, and
Mlencken at the helm the ship will
come through.
The public, always weak at stomach,
has run for the rail, and will be glad
to disembark and foreswear other voy-
ages of the' kind, until it forgets.
Meanwhile it will console itself with
Victorian inarshmallows, Bill Hart
Bud Fisher, and the mocktrola. A
dose of truth is toomuch for it. The
renascences and lapses of the Amer-
ican public have no top nor bottom
and no depth. They are as shallow
and as frequent as grease shots in a
quick lunch-and as important:
Shall Be Amused
It will be a ripe time for Stuart P.
Sherman, and his kind, to hold cami
theetings, prayers, and hymn singing
contests. Surely, then, the impending
Dark Age, will not be altogether bad
We' shall have amusement.
Before the battle, Brethren, I com
mend "The Bookman" for guidancE
and lig'ht.

PENS

WA TERMAN, CONKLIN
SWAN

Subscribe to the Wolverine.'
for the rest of -the Summer.-Adv.

Silver and Gold
Pencils'

E VLRSHA RP
FYNE POINT

"1

T-

10:30 A. M..

UNPAID SUBSCRIPTIONS

AL ARM CLOCKS
H..ailer 6&,Fuller
State Sreet Jewlers
PALM BEACHSUITS

n Evera. .Subject: "Hopeful Aspects
the Work in China."
:30 BIBLE CLASS
will speak on "Opportunities for
Work in China."
6:30 P. M.
iety meets in the Parlors of the Church.
'I

3ATIONAL CHURCH

10:30

;t, of the Chicago Theological Seminary,
will speak:
IAN EDUCATION"

i
Ell
II
I

Tlose who have subscribed
for The Wolverine but have not
paid for it should either'mail
$1 to The Wolverine,' Press
building, or leave that amount.
at the office, second floor, Press
building. Office hours 8:30 to
12, and 1:30 to 5 o'clock.
DELIVERY
Subscribers of The Wolverine
who are not receiving their pa-
per regularly on Tuesday,
Thursday, and Saturday after-
noons, or who have complaint
against the delivery, are re-
quested to call the business of-
flice, telephdne 960.=.
0PE N AIR
C A M.P U S
S E RVI C E
The Rev. F. P. Arthur of
the Church of C h rist
speaks oan t h e subject,
The Christian's Program."

at $10.00 This Week
J. Karl Mal0o1m
604 Eat Liberty Street

I

As a safe example of a greot leader,
ean Lloy concluded his lecture by
naming and eulogizing Lincoln who
was so human, so farseeing, and so
insistent.

I-,

...
...
....
. .
r.
s
e
r
r
r
.a

===

Farmers & Mechanics Bank

E BELIEVE you
bank. And a
like better

will find :here your ideal of a
bank that every year you'll
; 99 9

I

101
1I11111

-105 SO. MAIN STREET

330'50. STATE
(NickeIs' Area

U

Member of the Federal Reserve

,,

SE COND

-HAND

BOOKS

ioir directed by
Organist.

FO"R ALL D.EPARTMENTS
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS will find the Right Prices at'

Mr. George Oscar Bowen,
leads the music.

II

I

A

This service is b
plaza in front of the
it--.---

on the
versity

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