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June 21, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

the last issue of The Wolverine
s stated that the religious.service
in front of thi Library last Sun.
evening, at which time the Rev.
id McFadyen spoke on the sub-
"Fellow-workers with God", was
first Union service of the Sum-
session. The statement was in-
ct, as this was the second meet-
f the summer 'series, the first hav-
een held on July 10. Rev. L. A.
ett, pastor of the Presbyterian
ch, was the speaker at the first
~ /

Subscribe to the Wolverine. $1.00
the summer.-Adv.

for

..r... ....

11 find here your ideal of a_
nk that every year you'll

.
..
...

echanics Bank
330 SO. STATE STREET
(Niokels' Aroade)
e Federal Reserve
11UlllTSllililllllllllllll1 lt il i lli
XCHITCVUSH

).o0 This Week

1 Malcolm
ft Liberty Street

STATE STREET DEAERS
SAYTDEMANDSEA9 RATES
(Continued from Page One) 1
"Because the students demand the best
quality of ice cream and flavorings
and thebest service possible, it is ne-
cessary that we make a fair profit from
the goods we sell. Otherwise we would
be forced out of business. I have stud-
led the situation carefully and am con-
vinced that it is impossible for me to
serve ice cream sodas and sunaes of
the best quality for less than 20 cents
including the war tax."
'We can serve ice cream sodas and
sundaes right now for 10 cents and
still make enough profit to keep up
business," says W. G. Fletcher, of the
Calkins-Fletcher Drug company. "It
is possible to make ice cream concoc-
tions just as cheap as our trade wants
them. We are now charging 20 cents
and up for our ice cream sundaes and
sodas because we have found that the
students demand the best quality of
ingredients and, are willing to pay
what they are worth. We are not mak-
ing any more oil the ice cream we sell
now than we did when we could serve
the same dish for 10 cents. If the
students want cheaper grades of ice
cream and flavors used at our foun-
tains we can accommodate them with
lower prices."
Says Impossible to Cut
It is impossible to serve a good ice
cream soda or sundae for 10 cents,
W. F. Ray of the Betsy Ross shop de-
clares. "I am not 'guessing in this
matter, I know," he said. The soda
cost as given by Mr. Ray is as follows:
Fruit syrup, .02; carbonated water,
.007; No. 16 dipper of ice cream, .043;
salaries, .02; overhead, .045; making
a total cost of ,135 cents. These fig-
ures have been compiled from a set of
books kept over a period of years.
"Just now I can see no hope for a
reduction in price on ice cream," Mr.
Ray added. "Fountain prices may de-
cline, we all hope they will. But w
cannot drop prices'without justification.
At present 20 cents including war tax
is about right for sodas, 25 cents for
sundaes with 'crushed fruit, with ex-
tra for nuts, whipped cream, etc. A
bitter sweet marshmallow pecan sun-
dae should sell for 35 or 40 cents, it
costs the dealer more than 25 cents
to put up."
- Delta Eliminates War Tax
S"We pay the war tax on all our sodas
ourselves; we don't aim to charge it
up to the students," said N. J. Konald,
of the Delta, at State and Packard
streets, recently. "I think all these
folks who say they are being over-
charged are talking on something they
don't know anything about," he added.
The Delta charges 10 cents for
"cokes," 15 cents for sodas and syrup
sundaes, and 20 cents for fresh fruit
sundaes.
Yesterday 's Scores
American League
Chicago 3, Philadelphia 2.
New York 7, Cleveland 1.
Detroit 2, Washington 1.
St. Louis 10, Boston 9.
National League
Chicago 10, Philadelphia 0,
Philadelphia 8, Chicago 0.
Cincinnati 2,New York 1.
St. Louis 8$, Brooklyn 5.
Pittsburgh 2, Boston 0.
MAISON FRANCAIS CANNOT
TAKE CARE OF APPLICANTS

TRYOUTS WANTED BY UNION
FOR RECORDING SECRETARY
Tryouts for work in the office of
the recording secretary of the Union
are asked to report -for work during
the Summer session as soon as po's-
sible in order to leamn the work be-
fore the regular fall term. - Men of
the class of 1924 only are eligible for
the position, as that length of time is
required to learn the duties of the of-
fice.
Iark ,Wattle Of
Chateau Tierry

- - -

Plans for the picnic to be held by
the Gun and Blade clubon Saturday
to mark the third anniversary of the
fighting of Chateau Thierry have been
completed.
Six three-ton trucks will be provided
to carry the party to Naylor grove, on
Dead lake, one-half mile from Whit-
more lake, where entertainment in
the form of dancing, Lames, and ath-
letic events, including swimming, for
which prizes donated by the Business
men of Ann Arbor, will be provided.
Every member is asked to bring his
swimming suit.
After these events, "chow" call will
be sounded. Other features will be an
address by Dr. Tom Lovell, andImusic
by, Tang and Travera. The- party will
leave at 1:00 o'clock from State street
between Jefferson and William. ;
The Gun and Blade club invites all
federal board students to the picnic
and' to -the meeting of the club which
will be held at 7:30 o'clock this evening
in room 318 of the Union.
300 WOMEN ATTEND TEA IN
BETSY BARBOUR GYMNASIUM
More than 300 attended .the tea giv-
en in honor of the women of the
Summer session by Miss Marguerite
Chapin, acting dean of women, from
3:30 until 6:30 o'clock Tuesday aft-
ernoon in the reception rooms of Bet-
sy Barbour gymnasium. Mrs. J. B.
Effinger, Mrs. W. B. Hinsdale, Mrs.
E. H. Kraus, Mrs. A. H. Lloyd, Mrs.
H. Cabot, and Mrs. A. S. Whitney

Ann arbor Girl
Narcissa Elizabeth, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. C. W. Merkel, 928 South
State street, and John Stephenson
Perrin, '21, of Escanaba, Mich., were
married in Chicago on July 18, it was
announced yesterday. Mrs. Derril
Pratt, wife of "Del Pratt", the former
Michigan baseball coach, was matron
of honor, and Marshall S. Perrin,
brother of the groom, was best man.
Mrs. Perrin *graduated from South-
ern Seminary, Buena Vista, Va., a
year ago and was later a student in
the University. The groom, who is
known in athletic circles as "Jack",
graduated from the University last
month and has since been ' playing
with the Boston Red Sox. He won his
"M" two years in football and base-
ball, and is a member of Michigauma
and Phi Gamma Delta.
For the present Mr. and Mrs. Per-
rin will be in Waterbury, Conn., where
he will play baseball preparatory to
returning to he Red Sox later in the
season.
WARTHIN EXPLAINS CAUSE
OF CANCEROUS GROWTHS
(Continued from Page One).
ble, but the cancer cells themselves
have not. One condition has, how-
ever, always been found in cancer
patients - a constant irritation for
some period of time of a tissue or
gland of the body. The cells "get the
habit of growing" and finally, after
the irritation has ceased, their reac-
tion continues and a tumor forms.f
Disease Spreads Rapidly
He then went on to describe the
disastrous effect's of the disease on the
human or animal patient. Once the,
cancer has a strong hold on the sys-
tem, its immortality as a cell and its
ability to grow when detached from
its parent tissue render removal .al-
most impossible. The disease spreads
and finally stops the normal function-
ing of the organs altogether.
Many types of tumors, such as
moles and warts, have the character-
istics of this growth, but their effect
on the system is not at all felt. It is
only the so-called "malignant" cancer
that is dangerous to the patient.

Prof. Emil Lorch; of the Architec
tural college, recently received from
George W. Hemphill Jr., of Ypsilanti
a tile and a piece of glazed terra cot
ta from the Temple of Heaven, Pek
in, Chna. Both of these curios were
secured by Mr. Hemphill while in
China on a mission for the United
States government.
Michigan Grads
Start New Dailj
(Continued from Page One)
well fitted her' for her work. Wallac
P. Elliott, '23, with two years ex
perience on the Daily behind him, ha
the second Michigan name to appea
among the reporters. He will be en"
ployed for the summer only.
The editorial staff is not alone grac
ed with the names of Wolverines. O
the business side are three Michiga
men and one woman. The assistar
advertising manager is Donnell I
Shoffner, '20, former advertising man
ager of the Daily. Louise N. Hatcl
'19, is advertising saleswoman. Tb
post of assistant circulation manage
is held by Tom A. Hart, '20,, whi(
Harlow H. Akers, '22, is classifie
manager and advertising salesman.
Times-News Men
Two men who were formerly con
nected with the Ann Arbor Times
News are now with Mr. Osius in hi
new enterprise, R. D. VanAlstin, fe
a time general manager of the An
Arbor paper, being 'advertising an
circulation manager, and George B
Hudiutt, a circulation assistant un
der Mr. VanAlstin, occupies the sam
position in Port Huron.
In making the selection of his sta
Mr.. Osius has kept to the belief tha
in youth he will find the best service
the more responsible positions onl
being held by- older men. Subscril
tions are coming in at a great rate
and advertisers are responding nobl
to the call for copy. Everything look:
well for success for the Port Huro
Press, a paper largely controlled b
graduates and students of the Univer
sity of Michigan.

arries

r

COOL

>f a heavy meal eat
incheon of dainty
ies, appetizing sal-
efreshing sundaes.
LI H
"The Home of Sweets"
North University Avenue

helpedi
wafers

receive the guests. Punch and
were served as refreshments.

d,

SECOND-

HAND BOOKS

FOR ALL D E PAR TME NTS
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS will find the"Right Prices at

W

A H

R

U NIVERSITY
BOOK STORES

'I

GAN

N'G

an
9f
PATRONIZE WOLVERINE
ADVERTISERS
They Deserve and Appreciate
Your Trade'
SWe Deserve and Appreciate
Your Co-operation
IT MEANS A BIGGER AND
BETTER WOLVERINE

KS

T Ready.

i Sale.

As the number of applications for the
Maison Francais has far exceeded the
acomtmodations, it is hoped by the di-
rectors, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Carry,
that larger quarters may be secured
for the coming year.
One of the special features at the
house recently was the celebration of
the French 'national holiday on July
14. At this time the house was gaily
decorated in French and American
colors, and was thrown open to its
members who entertained the French
professorsof the Summer school.
COUNTRY SCHOOLS OFFER
EDUCATORS BIG PROBLEM
(Continued from Page One)
There must be a gradual building up
of this rural educational system it
cannot be improved by a single sweep-
ing reform, he said.
"There has not yet been found a unit
in rural life that will enable it to
maintain a closer relationship, and
until this centralizing unit is found
there can be no great advancement in
rural education," Professor Burnham
concluded.
Women's League Membership
Those wishing to join the Women's

Specials

for

Your Choice of any Palm Beach Suit in the

This,

store

$19.85

W

i

Dolphine Pure Silk Hose- 65c
Vassar Union Suits- 98c to $2.10
All Straw Hats at Half Price
Soft Collar Shirts- $1.25 to $4.i
,iDscut .on.0$$ Al Adera Rochee Suits

oustw

'Lutz Clothi

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