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June 16, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-16

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1 S V L

1 this meet the Tiger team will
ed by the track stars from Cor-
rho will combine their strength
hat of Princeton in an endeav-F
again defeat the English combi-
. Among Princeton's athletes
>n Lourie, Charles Halsey, and
peers, who were instrumental in
ger win last July. With this
of athletes Keen Kitzpatrick's
>gether with Moakley's men
thaca will present a formidable

y team.

great- Tesreau Again to Coach Dartmouth
>f the Jeff Tesreau, former Giant, New
- year York National league pitcher, has
nville, signed a contract to coach the Dart-
mouth baseball team for the next
three seasons. Tesreau was fr rmerly
am one of the best hurlers in the 'big
track leagues but for the past three years
team has pointed the Dartmouth nines,
)xford which have been highly successful.
immer-
Black French Hurdler to Invade. America
-Cam- Georges Andre, one of the foremost
t July French athletes, will come to the

United States next September. An-I
dre's special events are the sprints
and the hurdles. He will compete in
England before embarking for Amer-
ica. In 'representing France in the
Olympic games Andre finished a close
fourth in the 400 metre hurdles. The
event was won by Frank Loomis, of
Chicago.
The Stadium Craze
The stadium bee seems to have stung
the athletic heads in all of the large
American universities. There is
scarcely a large school in the coun-
try which is not either laying plans for
a new athletic plant or has 'the con-
strdction actually under way. The im-
petus behind this country wide move-
ment seems to be the desire to accom-
modate the great throngs which annu-
ally assemble td witness the gridiron
battles. Every school is trying to ac-,
commodate its alumni body which re-f
turns every fall to cheer for its Almaj
Mater. Incidentally the accommoda-
tion of the alumni is being carefully
attended to since most of the stadiums
are being built with the money which
is solicited from the various alumni
bodies.
The growing popularity of football
as an intercollegiate sport has been
the greatest factor in this movement.
This has been particularly true in the
middle west and far west. The evenly
matched teams developed in these sec-
tions have taken the center of interest
away from the East. No longer do the
western football enthusiasts have to
look to the Harvard-Yale game as the
deciding contest of the year, but in-
stead their interest centers in the Big
Ten race or in the title match for the
Pacific Coast championship. Inter-
sectional contests have added greatly
to the football interest.

GRID FANS LOOK
FOR CLOSE RACE

Nearly

Iowa should win these games sh
be a contender for the title.
Hawkeye eleven does not meet
igan, nor Wisconain.

Every Big-Ten School
Strengthen; Four Main
Contenders

Is

mmommohnow
-------- ---

NCE

e will the family is a
The :ul; daughter
Mich- tror^ies umor?

difficult. H
,.nd wo'men

S

y- Friday- Saturday
c - Best Floor

iunnr
.
. ...
.

Tonight

THLETIC CLU
MORE LAKE

At the present timeI
nois, Wisconsin, and

Ohio State,
Michigan

Illi-
are

IN ANN ARBOR
night
"Too Much
Speed'
LJN DAY

making arrangements to seat the
crowds which attend the fall games,
wh ie on.the coast Washington has a,
new stadium, while California and
Stanford expect to have new p'ants in
the near future. This is in striking'
contrast to the feeling a decaue ag
when the University of Chicago was
planning to build a concrete stand on
Stagg field. The original drawings and
:seating cap~acity were reduced uponj
the advice of the anti-athletic faction
which held that there would be no in-
terscholastic games in five years. At
present this faction is very quiet.

MICHIGAN LISTED AMONG
PRE-SEASON FAVORITES
From early indications football fans
'may expect to see one of the most
hotly contested seasons in the history
of the Big Ten when the curtain
rises on the 1921 gridiron. Nearly
every Conference school is strength-
ened and no less than four teams
must be given serious consideration
as being strong enough to win the
coveted title. During the last fewI
seasons Conference teams have be-
come more and more evenly match-a
ed. The coming season of 1921 ap-
pears tq be no exception to this rulel
for in no instance can one school be
picked which stands out above thef
rest in its number of returning grid-
iron warriors.f
Discounting all of the "ifs", and
possible upsts in dope, Wisconsin,
Iowa, Illinois, and Michigan seem to
have the; best pre-season possibili-
ties, while Ohio State and Minnesota
are to be reckoned with. Some of the
pother Conference institutions may]
develop powerful aggregations but
th'ere is no indication that any of+
them will be able to put teams on
the field which can match the ones'
put out by these other universities.
Wisconsin
The University of Wisconsin has, the'
nucleus of one of the greatest squads
the Cardinal has hadl since the 'days
of 1915 when they were tied for Con-.
ference honors. Sundt, the great
plunging fullback and kicker on the
Badger team, will be back for anoth-
er season as also will Halfbacks El-
liott and Williams, together with,
Bunge at, center and other capable
linemen. With this material to start
with Coach Richards is very optimis-
tic.
Elliott and Williams were two of the
best halfbacks in the West last year,
while Sundt played a sterling game
at fullback., Bunge is a veteran cen-
ter and is highly rated. Wisconsin
has Conference games with North-
western, Illinois, Minnesota, Michigan
and Chicago, The Badgers meet
Michigan at Madison Nov. 12.
' hIwa,
Howard Jones at Iowa is planning
on a bi season for the Iowa City
lads. With Slater, Belding and the
Devine brothers back for another
season the Hawkeye mentor should be
able to produce a team which will
give a good account of itself. Slater,
+ Belding and Aubury Devine have all
demonstrated their ability and' were
chosen on Eckersall' All-Western
selections. Iowa has a game with its
traditional enemy, Minnesota.
For the past two seasons the Hawk-
eyes have downed the big Gopher
team. This season Dr. Williams an
every, member of the Gopher.. squad.
will be out to redeem themselves by
trouncing Iowa. Iowa in a like man-
ner has lost close games in the past
two years to Illinois, and will be out
to take the scalp of the Indians, when
the two elevens line up this fall. If

Illlnois ~ridren, Uncle Horace, the sisi
CCoach Bob Zuppke of Illinois uni- la,' and Lord Andrew Gordon,
versity, although hard hit by the loss teresting dramatic and comedy
of Depler and the Fletcher brothers rial handled by two master build
by graduation, still has enough players
on his roster to make it certain that
the Indians will be contenders for the h ce e
championship honors. In the back-
field the Illinois squad has as veter- The village drug store, the
ans, Capt. Larry Walquist, Fullback mart for everything from :
Jack Crangle and Halfback Pedel. graphs to lollypops, has been E
(Continued on Page Four) aningly exploited in "One a MiI
l1ouglas MacLean's latest Paran
7ne.Stae l comedy, which will be Ares
v the Majestic theater beginnin
, morrow.
AT TILE GARIIICK JThe store -s a study in small
One of the most highly amusing and trade versatility. Everything v
entertaining of comedies, "Adam and the druggist's ,province, and
Eva," will be the offering of the lon- things outside, are displayed in
stelle company at the Garrick the- acteristic disarray, while in the
ater next week. Though this play had dows, draped with red and gree
its premiere at the Garrick and has per streamers are enormous dis
been presented here on three ccas- of "Kni ;ht's 99", the miraculous
ions, it ranked highest in the requests cea for all1 human ailments
for plays received from Bonstelle pa- which hinges the main action c
trons, most of them remarking to the story,
effect they wished to see Frank Mor- The picture tells of the 'viciss
gan play Adam Smith. of Jimmy Knight, the leading rol
"Adam and Eva" is from the pens of trayed by lacLean, when he:
those two clever playwrights, George on the market a miraculous me
Middleton and Guy Bolton, authors of wvich, as is disclosed in the
"Polly With a Past" and other success- scenes of the picture, really pos
es. The story centers about James curative. powers.
King, who has succeeded in the rubher "One a Minute", a successful
business, but who has made a failure success by Fred Jackson, was
of his home. He is beset by re.t.ives ed to th screen by Joseph Fr:
! of his late wife and capricious children Poland. Marian DeBeck, who r
who look upon him as a money bag. I fnItered fllmdorn from the New
It begins to tire father King so he stage, .appears in the leading :
decides to set down ┬▒estrictions and 'Ie role, while Victor Potel, A
the children chafing under the new I Robson, Frances Raymond and
rule decide to get rid of him. am 'ettie assume important c
They persuade a friendly doctor to terizations.
advise him he needs a trip and thus
be free from his dictation. Father. .'Ilo'I7PHIIllhilhIfll1IilIIiillIlllI
however,' becomes acquainted with 9HRUOM EF- G O 0 K E D JEA
their plans and, though he ti kes th
trip, he leaves one of his business Served at RHIODE1
managers, Adam Smith, is man g1r 2 1 1 S O. I N G A L L
of his family. Of course .included in ┬░rlftnltllia3Ef li 1 l
JULYS1'-M A E

Mac LI

ute

EAN
Illllilllillil11:

EIGHAP

"_
R
-
k
M

Kirschbaum Suits

Cub
Also The
nc Fans

The Oldest Football
Not wishing to be outdone by their
American friends, the French have
come forth in an article in the La Nou-
velle Revue of Paris, claiming that
football was played in France in the
15th century. The French writer re-
marks that football, commonly regard-
ed as the national game of England
and the favorite sport among Amer-
ican colleges, was formerly popular in
France and doubtless would have con-
tinued to be the pational sport of
France had it not been for an act of
the parliament of Paris which forbids
its being played. This Writer says
that the old French gane was called
Le baloon but since the modern game
has been developed the Frenchmen
have adopted the American term of
football. The old game according to
the French writer was played on some
meadow and in it victory was less re-
garded than the desire for personal
conflict. In 1761 the parliament of
Paris absolutely refused to permit Le
baloon or football to be played. The
French have an interesting account of
the origin of the gridiron sport but if
the Egyptians 4ear of the new sport
some of their writers may convince us
that under the pyramids lie the bodies
of former All-Egyptian quarterbacks
and players of every description whof
were serving touchdowns 5,000 years
ago, and that our teams are just reach-
ing the form theirs used to have.

Take time Saturday
Suits an Sale

to see

$2.9.50

They're from our regular Stock that were
$40. $42.50 and $45.
Every suit in our store reduced from
low level prices to still lower.
Fred 'W. Gross
309 South Main

at only

/ A

PATRONIZE WOLVERINE
ADVERTISERS
They Deserve and Appreciate
Your Trade

h..

Vd.r "
-qTAIII-

fl THIS
IE . COLUMN
CLOSES
ING AT 3 P.M.
-Fraternity pin, name "T. P
:" on back. C01. 2738. 4-5
FOR SALE
3ALE-Household furniture in
llent condition, practically
Call 1211-J, Dr. C. J. Marinus,
Glenn Ave. 8-1

ManyNoted fMen
At Iliology Camp
Many prominent men are associated
with the biological station of the Uni-
versity, which is situated on Douglas
.ake, Cheboygan county, in northern
Michigan. Among the instructors are
Prof. Frank C. Gates, of Kansas State
Agricultural college, who is acting as
assistant professor of botany; Mr.
Frank Smith, of the University of Illi-
nois; Prof. Zeno D. Metcalf, of the
zoology department at the North CaroI
lina Agricultural and Engineering col-
lege, and Prof. George E. Nichols, of
Yale. The camp is in charge of Prof.
George R. LaRue, of the' zoology de-
partment.
There are about 45 students at the
camp, living in tents and small shacks
which are situated on the side of the
lake. Under the supervision of the'
men in charge they will continue their
biological studies in the open, their
time between studies being spent in
swimming, fishing and hiking.

1
t

We Deserve and Appreciate
Your Co-operation
IT MEANS A BIGGER AP
BETTER WOLVERINE

i
4

I
4 O
IVA
4PF
s

SHOWS AT

2, 3:30, 7,8:45

LAST TI M E TODAY
MAE MARSH
IN
"NOBOD1'S KID"'
SUNDAY - TU'E.SDAY
B LANCHE SWEET
in
"THAT GIRL MONTANA"

LA S T T I M E T O D A
CA R ME L M YE R
I N
" T HE K I SS"
INTERNATIONAL NEWS with scenes from
Track Meet.
SUNDAY - TUESDAY
Louis Mayer's
""The Woman in

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