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June 14, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I .....

most of
'I Sand-
a. Teas-
s. But
lie her-

ore pastor al, not
,t so rugge :. Carl
,brutal, search-!
ost are the ex-
s, of the firve men-

-Of the two Sandburg pleases me
the m~ore, but even to one so polemi-'
cally inclined as myself Frost reaches
into the emotions.
In a manner Frost is an abioge-
netic product. His writing does not
resemble the sweet sounding piffle ofI
the Harvard school, nor yet, as I
have intimated, is he a "result of Whit-
man's influence. And surely he is, no
disciple of Poe. Whitman was cosmic
and rough, gloriously so. Poe was
mystic5, even lZ-pochondriacal. Frost!
resembles neither closely, though he
is more like Whitman than Poe if a
likening to one or the other must "be
made.,
First Recognized in England I
And it must be remembered "that
Frost, a new germ plasm in .America's
literary awakening, was not recogniz.
ed in America, but in England. His}
first volume of verse, "A Boy's,sWil~l",
was published in London in 1913. His
second v'olume, "North of Boston",
was also printed there, in 1914. Both
books" have been since published in
this country by Henry Holt and com-
pany. Finally his third volume,
"Mountain Interval", went to press1

But there are some patient, loyal
students who stick it through. They
look, quiite melancholy. Truly school
irit is a geat thing. But perhaps
tlacy fear the other eating places will
be wors e, and their suspicions are,
I erhaps, not founded on anything flim-1
svier than 'experience.
Bring ("n the Sodium Bicarbon~ateI
Now I have a really good, con-
structive suggestion to offer. One
would think that r' might be angry
but I'm not. I believe that in the
end, all is for the best. Briefly I sug-
gest that the tap room be turned over
to the Ann Arbor department of .pub-
lie wvorks,. and that a place for the
students to~ eat be started. I am rath-
er modest or I should work it out in
detail; al labout the fly-traps and soap
factor~ies and everything.
But a number of heads are better
than one. Let some of the other
readers write in about .their experi-
ences at the Union. In addition to
sodium bicarbonate, I need sympathy.
"FALSTAFF"".

I

=il

WLLAC
= "TOO ML
with AGNES AYERS

r

JCHIB

anid THEODO0RE I

Elii

PALM BEACH

at $ 10.00

This Week

.. Karl Malco
604 East Liberty Street

in 1916.
In his first book one finds a Swin-
burnian touch, a sheer dlelight in
rhythm and rhyme. It is almost pure-
ly~ pastoral though in one' poem. he
descends to the banality of the oldI
New England school. I refer to "The
Trial by Existence", a sort of maud-
lin chant which might well have beenI
executed by Edgar Guest, an imitatorl
of imitators. Again Frost hits the
low level of Bryant or falls into the
excellent nonsense of Longfellow. "A
Boy's Will" pleases me in spots, and
'chiefly for its music and fantasy.
Improement in "North of Boston"
t "North of Boston" is~ a "decidled im-'
provement, still pastoal, but less ly- !
ric and smelling more of the earth.
Trhough the poems are "folksy" they
can rarely be compared with the gab-1
Me of the late James 'Wniteomb Ri-
ley. Frost's "Thy Death of the Hired

SHOWS AT

'r

2, 3:30, 7, 8:45

LAST TIME TO DA Y
ROYSTEWART
IN~
"THE DEVIL TO PAY"1

L AS T TI
WILLIAMI
"THiE IR
F RID 0AYV
CARMIE

F RID0A Y

SATURDAY

MAE MARSH
IN
"NOBODiY'S KID"

6TH

enej

hey come to a
A4 Riley at his
of Frost at his

Store closes at 12 o'clock
on Wednesday during.
July and Auigus.t

ro

are, in the poem. just
:wo lines which I call to

*Awd-46

Stove

There,' when

ave to go thlero,
have to. talie you in."
Aside CODMutional Restrli
this Second 'volume Frost
whatever doggerel he may
ssed completely behind
(Continued on Page Four)

EiST. 1857'

hasI
have,
him.

Two

D'o11

D

SATrURDAY, JU

dY

UNION, SERVICE
FEND)S FALT WITH
FEREPIN TAP ROOM~;
EUTS TO PR~ICES

r~llt9o, The Wolverine
Besides selling the Ladles Home
Journ~al the Michigan Union sells
beans, baked beans. But perh'aps I
overs'tate the case. Are the beans
"sold" or the fellow who buys them.
Nut this is quibbling, and there are
really not enough beans to quibble
about. Perhaps if we paid more
The Unhiion also sells ice cream,
very good ice cream, what there is of
it, for 10 cents the dish. But add a
centime's worth of malshmal lowy and
says, "it is really surprising what a
it becomes 20 Cents. As the cook book
little pit of marshmallow will do".
Wb*hat Ails the Gravy?
B~ut perhaps I am, fletcherizing a'
marshmrallow. Let's drop the subject,
and ta~ke up another. Has the reader
ever tasted the gravy which the
Union pours over the "piece dle re-
sistanee" and the attendant spuds? If
not, has , the reader ever tasted;
600-W?
It rather reminds one of the army.
One stands in line sometimes. quite
a while ; one grabs a hunk of alu
minumi; one passes in front of the,,
chow. 'The chow reminds one of the I
army also. But there the resemblaplee
ceases, for the meal must be pit tor.,
Oh, amply paid for! AntirJ, ; seconds.
Forgets, If Inolge-tion 'Permits
One eats the~re, and one quits eating
there, and quite forgets about it, that
is, if one's indigestion will let orle,
And with a large number of students
there are always inew persons trying
it out, so~ why should the Union care?

Every department in the store
Here are a few
Little Things of
Great Importance
Pink anid blue and white plaid ribbons, satin fin-
ish for use as sashes or hair bows, $1.35 value, 2j(
yards for $2.00.
Light and dark warped ribbons, regularly priced
$f.1o, 2/' yards for $2.0.
/Ribbons for camisoles, $4.25 regular price, for $2
a yard.
Plain white anid ,iubroidery cornered ha.ndker-
chiefs, 2W values, 16 for $2.00.
Sport handkerchiefs, 25c values, in lavender,
pink, and white, with embroidered corners, 12 for
'$2.00.
One lot of fancy neckwear, choice for $2.00.
Water proof traveling cases, $2.39 value for $2,
Graduated pearl beads, 3 length, $3.75' value for
$2.00.
$3.98 fancy hairpins for $2.00.
An assortmeut of rhinestone barpins, valves to
.$3.30 for $2.00.
One lot of bags and backstrap puraiea. values to
$5,50 for ,$2.00.

is offering nC12any ,-bar gains.
Lingerie for $2.00
An asstrtnwent of gowns, iii a njimber of por
styles, choice for $2.00.
Chemise, very special'for $2./00.
Corsets, some of discontinued lines, oilherR sli
ly soiled from handling, and some small size.
Special shipm~ent of camisoles, pink satin,
very dainty styles, at $2.00 each.
Attractive chemise, two for $2.00.
A dainty but plain style of cheniise, 3 for $2.(
Three camisoles for $2.00.

An assortment of camisoles, some
muslin and batiste, 4 for $2.00.

Y,

d platinum set
%pd'. R.~tirn to
2738. T4.5e

(Second Floor)

r
' rriR.rr r

ehold furnitu~re in
[ition, practically
Dr. C. J. Ma-
6-2
A Speedster. Very
Call phone No. 10.
ant ais. They brng

Special Opportunity to Buy Shoes
We are grouping all of our odds Reid ends in pumps and oxfordslinto one general assortment and placiu
oan sale Saturday at the extremely low price of $2 a pair. That means that we are offering some shoesc
higher price and much greater value than the price quoted. Some of th'ese shoes were bought to sell as
$io.oo and $12.00.
~Most of then a ay in narrow widths, A, AA, and AAA. All of these are black and most have highheels.
an v Mlievprpostithatyoustloeyindwillw isello saq aickly.w ricManyyn late or s"roppievrtht oey DllllarqickDayanylastshppSsat DrdayDaylwere disapwrepisap:
our supply was limited and was exhausted early in the day. (Main Floor)

.

_ .:

4CiNG the ARMORY'

Tickets

{ 70

Diuring Suemmer School

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