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June 09, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-09

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II

IC~iotugriur

I AT YOT

THREE TIM
A WEEK

. .1 -40 -

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY JULY 9, 1921

PRICE F

F t f
..

st Outlines Michigan 's Athletic
Objeetive Before Detroit fMeeting

315 ENROLL IN
' WOMEN'S LEAGUE

PERRIN DOES NOT BREAK
INTO QAME ON FIRST DAY
Although Jack Perrin, former-
Varsity -slugger; joined the Bos-
ton Red Sox in Detroit yester-
day, he did not get into the game'
as was expected. It is thought
Perrin will make his official de-
butin the big leagues early next
week, however, if not in the sec-
ondgame with Detroit this after-
noon.
Yesterday's fracas ended with
a 6 to 3 win for the Bostonians.

Y ,
a.
'
,

Fielding H. Yost, Michigan's noted
gridiron mentor, who has recently'
been appointed director of intercolle-
giate athletics at the University, was
given a .royal welcome by the Rotary
club of Detroit Wednesday afteruoon
at. its mid-week gathering. Coach
Yost and members of the University
of Michigan club were the specially
invited guests of the Rotary club.
Speeches were made by various mem-
bers of the club, who emphasized the
enviable football record Michigan has
madeduring Yost's regime. The pop-'
ularity of the choice of Yost' as direc-
tor of intercollegiate athletics was
well attested by the enthusiasm dis-
played by the Michigan alumni and
supporters.

Program of Parties, Plays, and
nics Arranged for Benefit
of Members

PIC.

FIRST SOCIAL MEETING IS
SET FOR MONDAY EVENING

M. A.C.CHOICE
MAY BE DELAYED
The reluctance of Prof. David Fri-
day, of the economics departnient, to
accept the presidency of Michigan Ag-
ricultural college, should it be offer-
ed him at the next meeting of the
state agricultural board on July 13,
has given rise to the belief that no
choice will be made at that time for
a successor to President Kedzie.
Although Professor Friday has
been most prominently mentioned for
the place, he has made, no move to
advance his candidacy. On the con-
trary he has let it be known that he
would be as well pleased' if it is not
offered.
Occupying a national prominence'
in the field of economics and engaged
in work on public utilities, Professor
Friday is reluctant to devote more
time to routine school work.

EEYES %OUTLINES
FATLTS IN RALLOT
)lution and Corraption of Present
Form Described in Yesterday's

Membership in the Women's league
for the Summer session reached a
total of 315 yesterday afternoon, ac-
cording to the announcement of Alva
Gordon, '23, president of the league.
A further increase in membership is
expected when women who are here
only for the summer become acquaint-
ed with the purpose of the organiza-
tion.
Meeting at Martha Cook
The first social meeting of the league
will be held from 7 to 8 o'clock Mon-
day evening on the Martha Cook ter-
race. Punch will be served and vari-
ous Michigan songs will be sung. All
women who are enrolled in the Sum-
mer session. whether league members,

I URNGSUNM
SPOTLIGHT FOR JULY 28 3W
INa ARRANGED BY COMMIT
TEE IN CHARGE
ALL DEPARTMENTS TO
KEPT OPEN F OR SESSI1
Next Year's President Announces
Committees for
1922
All the regular features of the v
of the Michigan Union will be i
tinned during summer school, acc
ing to R. Emerson Swart, '22E, i
year's president, who is in ch,
during the summer. Dances will
given every Friday night during
vacation session. The departma
that are open during the acade
session will all be-open-with the
ception of the. ladies' dining rc
where the only meals served will
breakfasts., 0
Summer Spotlight
Plans for a summer spotlight,
regular feature of the Summer
sion, to be given July 28 in Hill al
torium, are now being made.
program is similar to those / gi
twice a .year by tie Unioh, altho
the artists are L:'mted to sums
scb,)ol :tderts. A few acts are
l:. crr aged for by the commnitte,
~h rLe at the present time.
'e 'lt of committees will be

LLY SOLD TO
i OF SNhORTER FO9M!

soured and pes-
e little cares, in
n's, whether an
disguised as an
public favr) is
It is therefore of
whether the long

To Develop Students
Coach Yost in a speech outlined
Michigan's new athletic objective and
briefly told of his plans for a greater
competitive Michigan. fIe urged a
united support for Wolverine athletics
in general and for the new activity
in particular. He stated that the Uni-
versity should develop every ,student
mentally, morally and physically. In
the opinion of Coach Yost, this latter
part has been neglected to a certain
extent, and he hopes to see moarj ex-
'ercise for the average student in the
future. It was partly with this in
view that the new department =under
Yost has been created.
"'K.s through the agency of games
and athletics, practiced under favor-
ablj conditions, that the child and
youth mos naturally acquire habits
og obedience, subordination, self-sac-
rifice, co-operation, friendliness, loy-
alty, and capacity for leadership, to-
gether with the ability to lose without
Sulking and to win without boasting,
a spirit of fair play and all that is im-
plied in the word of spdrtsmanship.',
New Stadium
Coach Yost also told of ,;ichigan's]
athletic development. He stated that
by the first of September Michigan will
have a football stadium which will
hold 44,000 persons. This stadium will .
be opened for the first time October
(Continued on Page Four)'
SUNDAY SENDICES I
ANN ARBOR CHURCHES

OLD
or riot, are invited to attend the meet-

i AAY r'

, -
STARS WILL ANSWER
CALL OF COACH IN
SEPTEMBER

But if he were a hundred per cent
[American and a firm believer in de-
mocracy and the wisdom of the com-
, mon people,' he would take the advice
3 offered by Prof. J. S. Reves at five
o'clock yesterday afternoon in Natural
Science auditorium, and howl for a
short ballot.
After a preliminary resume showing
the progress 'of the ballot from the
Greek's potshard of ostracism to the
I introduction and the corruption of the
Australian. ballot, Professor Reeves
exhibited a number of ballots.
According to Professor Reeves, the
present form of ballot had its origins
in the electibns of the Roman church.
As a state affair the written ballot
was used in the English colonies be-
fore it was used in the mother coun-
try, but even the colonies apparently
adopted it from the Reformed church
of Holland,
Tt is Professor Reeves' opinion that
this leads to inefficiency, and worse, in
the ballet. The ballot, says Professor
Reeves, should be simple and it should
put tht thing squarely up to the voter
G regardless of parties. "The ballot
puts a premium on stupid partisan
voters," he said.
The original short ballot, in the
opinion of Professor Reeves, would be
a decided improvement In this, if the
voter had preferences outside of party,
he would be saved the work of sort-
ing them out. It would practically
force him to make the choice of his
convictions, And this, the writer sin-
cerely believes, should be done it we
are to make more than a pretense ot

I NELIGIBI ITYAF FECTS
ONLY 3 FOOTBAL MEN

TOI

In spite of the hot weather, there
should be unusual interest shown , in
this week's church offerings, for a
high standard is being maintained for
the benefit of Summer school stu-
dents.
At the First Metthodist church, the
Rev. Dugald McFadyen, of London,
England, will give the second of his
sermons on "The Chunch and Its Re-
ilations to World Movements". Dr.
McFadyen is strongly in favor of clos-
er relations between England and
America, and will continue to speak'
in the church during Pr. Stalker's ab-
sence in Europe.
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas will preach
one of his final sermons at the First
Congregational church. His subject
for the morning will be "The Habit
of Self-Dominance",
Rev. John Mason Wells, of the Bap-
tist church, will give the first of the
sermons on "Fundamental Questions",
entitled "The Bible in Our Scientific
Age", at the regular morning service
at 10:30 o'clock. At 12 o'clock the
Bible Class for summer students and
others will be held in the Baptist
Guild house. The subject for this Sun-
cay is "The p41 of Isaiah and His
Sermon on the Fruitless Vineyard".;
St. Andrew's |piscopal church has
its three regular services, Holy Com-
munion at 7:30 o'clock, children's
service at 9:30 o'clock, and the regu
lar morning prayer and sermon by the
Rev. Charles T. Webb, curate, at
10:30 o'clock on "Adventures in Rou-

ing.
Miss Frances C. Mack, business
manager of the Martha Cook dormi-
tory, has donated the use of the
grounds for the meeting, and has of-
fered to open the building to those
who are interested in seeing its un-
usual architcture and mural decora-
tions.
The following committees have been
appointed for the summer:
Social committee: Dorothy Roehm,
chairman; Carol McDonald; Margaret
I Wotton, Gertrude Clark, Jane Wil-
liams, Rose Agerter, Mrs. Grace Ben-
jamin, and Velda Bogart.
;Dramatic coipmittee: Madeline Mc-
Gurk, chairman; Mabel Helman, Mil-
dred Sherman, Florence Brown, and
Blanche Howell.
Publicity committee: Margaret
Kraus, chairman; Muriel Gaine, Eve-
lyn Eastman, and Muriel Praper.
Will Conduct Program
Throughout the session the league
will conduct a program of parties,
plays, picnics, and special features
for the purpose of creating University
spirit among students and getting
hem acquainted with, each other.
Every woman enrolled In the Summer
session may join by paying the mem-
bership fee of 25 cents.
LecturePro gr'am
July 11
5 p. =m.-Panama (in Spanish, illus-
trated), Mr. Gustave Michaud.
8 p. m.-Some Problems of British
Rule in India, Prof. E. A. Horne, of
Patna university, India.'
8:30 ,. m.-Visitors' night at the Ob-
servatory. Admission by ticket only.
July 12
5 p. m.--The Public Schools of Mich-
igan, Pres. D. B. Waldo, of the Western
State Normal school, Kalhmazoo
8 p. m.-Causes of Mental Disorder,
Prof. A. M. Barrett.
8:30 p. m.-Visitors' night at the Ob-
servatory. Admission by ticket only.
July 13
5 p. m.-The Flower Garden in Re-
lation to Small Homes (illustrated),
Prof. A. Tealdi.
8 p. m.-Concert. - Faculty of the
University Scool of Music. (Hill au-
ditorium).
8:30 p. m.-Visitors' night at the Ob-
servatory. Admission by ticket only.
July 14
5 p. m.-Niagara Falls and Vicinity
(illustrated), Assistant Prof. K. C. Mc-
Murry.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pic-
tures..
July 15
5 p. m.--School Administration from
the Social Side, Mr. Peter Mortensou,
superintendent of schools, Chicago.
8 p. m.-Our Great Undeveloped Re-
sources, Superintendent Mortenson. .
State Surveys Summer Resorts
All resort places in. the southern
part of this state were described as
being in a "satisfactory condition" as
regards sanitation, by W. C. Hirn,
assistant sanitary engineer' of the
Michigan department of health. A de-
cided -improvement over last season
in every summer resort surveyed by
the state's traveling laboratory, was

With the eligibility handicap suc-
cessfully surmounted by all but three
of Yost's hopefuls for. next year's
Varsity football team, Michigan ,fol-
lowers are looking forward confident-
ly to the comn, soason. Alf of the
return--g rst string men. except
Johns have completed their courses
with flying colors.'
Among the comers, Dunleavy andj
Crawforth failed to pass all theirE
work. Both Johns and Crawforth, by
attending the Summer session, have
excellent chances of removing all
barriers in the way of their answer-
ing "here" to Yost's roll call in Sep-
tember. .
There is no possibility of a handi-I
cap to Michigan's chances through in-1
eligibility this year. Steketee, Usher,
Dunne and Kirk, along with their
other stellar mates, will all be in
suits on the first day of practice next
fall.
WOMEN'S RESIDENCES HAVE
LARGE SU XER ENROLLMENT
Fourteen states alid two foreign
countries are represented at Betsey
Barbour house this summer. The res-
ident women apparently have a va-
riety, of interests, judging from the
courses which they have elected.
Nine have registered for public
health nursing, and nine in the grad-
uate school, while four have signed
for .library methods, two for law,
acd one for medicine.
Sixty-six women students are hous-
ed in Helen Newberry residence for
the Summer session. The officers,
chosen at a recent house mneeting, are
as follows: Beatrice Merriam, '14,
president; Edna Stevens, '22, vice-

uounced in next Tuesday's Wol
Any students with skits that we
suitable for the. program are r
ed to' get in touch with Fran
Phail, '21, who is in charge
entertainment.
Committees Announced
Appointments to some of thi
iittees of the Union for nex
were announced yesterday.
A. Bernstein, '22, will be chain
the publicity committee, with
ance Hatch, '22, as his ass
Gordon F. Godley, '22E, is apl
chairman of the committee fo
"ombined musical clubs and
U. Adms, '23, is general chi
for the fall reception. Edmu
Fox, '22E, will have charge c
dance comnmittee.
Yesterday 's Scc
American League
Chicago, 4; New York, 1.
Boston, 6; Detroit, 3.
St. Louis, 12; Washington, 2,
Philadelphia at Cleveland, ra
National League
New York, 1; Chicago, 0.
Pittsburgh, 5; Brooklyn, 3.
Boston, 5; Cincinnati, 0.
Philadelphia, 9; St. Louis, 4.

l
1
l
1
t
Y

Peace Treaty 11
Paris, July 8.-Accor
ing dispatch, ratificat
treaty of peace were c
tween China and Germ-

president; and Es
secretary-treasurer.

telle , Jacka, '20,

[HAT

T
E OF 105

PORTRITURE ONE Of THE MOST DIFF ICI
ART P HASES RSME OF fIUMAN

lII-*

heat upon the
d that the heat
rious other plan-
of such a small
found to be al-
record It.
ory that Jupiter

(By John S. Morris)
Not only to view intelligently .works
of portraiture, but in one evening to
gain a far greater appreciation of that
high art, was the privilege of those
who listened to the fascinating ilus-
trated lecture of Prof. Herbert R.
Cross of the fine arts department in
the auditorium of the Natural Science
building :ast evening.
In the introduction to his subject,
Professor Cross stated that portrait-
ure is one of the most difficult phases
of art. "First it must be a work of
.art, but of most importance a por-
trait must be a likeness, and the com-
bination of these two essential quali-
fications is one of the formidable tasks
of the artist," he said..
Sculpture vs. Painting
Professor Cross then discussed the
relative merits of sculptured and
painted portraits, and explained that

ception of the eyes, and tha
of 'view may be taken in
work of sculpture, while o
gle pis possible with painti
With painted 'portraiture
bility of coloring furnish
advantage, particularly in;:
the expression and characi
in the eyes of the subject.
more," said Professor Cros
trait .painter is to give nc
outward features, but in h
to bring out the finer poin
acter and the subtleties un
inner nature of the subjec
Aim at Photograpl
"Sometimes," continued
sor, "th\e aim is only to gi

r& A. Barrett, of the
church, will use "Ori-
beme for morning serv-
clock. At 11:30 o'clock'
[enderson will speak tol
ents on "The World
'reedom".

sect

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