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June 05, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L Y

IN t

A~.i V IN J2.~

:---.

MW

IICHT ONLY
- MARJORIE DAW
-- and HOUSE PETERS
- in The Great Redeemer
oprano. Orchestra - Topics - Cartoon
10 TOMORROW
A PRIVATE SCANDAL"'

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IV. AVE.

PRESIDENT ASKS
MEMORLTOWER
(Continued from Page One)
to the board of directory of the asso-
ciation.
President Burton, in his address be-
fore the alumni, reviewed the prog-
ress made during the first year of his
ad'ministration at Michigan, afid re-
vealed his policies for the future. He
told of the creation of the position
of dean of students, with Joseph A.
Bursley as first dean, and of the selec-
tion of Fielding H. Yost, veteran foot-
*all coach, as head of the department
of intercollegiate athletics.
Another important branch of the
University, in the opinion of President
Burton, is the department of hygiene
and public health. He said that Mich-
igan is conscious of the changes in
c the social order and told of the course
to train social and civic workers, the
training of dental hygienists, and em-
phasized the importance of the crea-
tion of the separate school of educa-
tion.
Announcement was made that Rob-
ert Frost, the poet, would come to
Ann Arbor next year. This is made
possible through the gift of $5,000 by
Chase S. Osborn, former governor of
"Michigan.
"The greatest thing that ever hap-
pened to Michigan" was the way
President Burton characterized the
increase in the mill tax recently
granted by the state legislature. He
told of the plans for spending thee
money, and remarked that within two
or three years $13,000,000 to $14,000,-
000 would pass through the hands of
the University.
Proposal was made tha the Michi-
gan Alumnus be changed from a
monthly to a weekly magazine. The
proposition was referred by a vote to
the board of directors with power to
act on the matter.
The change, as explained by W. B.
Shaw, general secretary of the Alum-
ni association, would eliminate-long
reports of work of the faculty and
present more news of the University.
Its cost would not be much more than
a 20 per cent increase over the pres-
ent form, as adv~tising and aid from
the 1V ichigan Union would help to
keep down the. cost of the publication
to the alumni. There will be one more
issue of, the publication as a monthly
magazine.
The endowment membership in the
association was increased to $50 pay-
able in advance or $60 payable in six
installments. The former, price was
$35. Two local men were appointed
members of the board of directors of
the Michigan Union to represent the
alumni. They are Dan F. Zimmerman
and Joseph A. Bursley, Dean of Su'
dents.

OFFICIAL NOTICES
To Students Desiring Part-time Work:
All students who wish to avail
themselves of the services of the Uni-
versity Employment bureau, are ask-
ed to register for such work in thie
office of Dean Bursley, room 2, Uni-,
verslty Hall - Phones, Main 1624 or
Campus 187-
To Ann Arbor People Desiring Stu-
dent Help:
The University Employment bureau
which is being conducted in *Dean
Bursley's office has a list of students
desiring part-time work. If you wish '
student help, please call at room 2,1
University Hall, and register. Tele-
phone either Main 1624 or Campus
187.
:UIT 2AY RETARD PLANS
XOR UNIVERSITY BUILDING
(Continued from Page One)
'ation tax to supply, operating funds
until the state tax startscgaing in.
next' January.'
State officials, however, were not
greatly worried over the suit. It was-
jointed out that the question as to
he right of the state to "t_ corpora-
ions for the right of doing business
has been upheld. The laweis so drawn
that the holding of one. sction un-
constitutional would ndt invalidate the
:emainder of the law, and it is point-
d. out that should the Supreme court
hold the maximum and minimum, pro-
vision invalid, the law would probably
stand as a whole and that it might
result in a muclh larger returnto the
state than originally estimated.
The action was brought on the first
day a return could be made The law
,rovides that the annual report of a
uorporation shall be filed during July
jnd August and over the year ending
Tune 30. The law also provides that
in filing a return a certified cheek for
The tax shall accompany it.

ACTIVITIES OPEN AT
(Continued from Page One)
practice and are planning on a big
clean-up soon.
The official baseball team is now
rounding into shape. The first game
showed that there was some excellent
[material in camp, even though Che-
boygan did manage to grab a seven to
five victory from us.
Win from Toplnabee
Pitcher "Wolf" Larson surprised the
Topinabee outfit with his good control
and his large variety of speed balls.
Practically the whole camp journeyed
over to see the game and ,everyone
came away in great spirits 'over our
first win, a seven to one victory, This
is said to have been the first victory
for Camp Davis in years.
Plans are now being laid for the
big game at Bay View, which will be
played in the near future.
Prof. Clifton O. Carey and Mr.
Slack arrived in camp during the
second week and immediately began
the railroad work. Professor John-
son left for Ann Arbor on Friday,
June 24, and will probably be gone
for a week or two.
"Black Fly" Good
The "Black Fly", the official pub-
lication of Camp Davis, has made its
appearance regularly 'every Saturday
since camp opened. "Milt" Goetz, the
managing editor, claims herhas a first
class paper, and we all agree, with
him. The Gargoyle would do well to
look over its cartoons and jokes.
Officers for the camp were elected
recently as ftllows:
H. D. Tubbs, '22E, general manager
and transportation manager; George
jW. ("Red") McCordic, '22E, athletic
manager; R. Donald ("Don') Max-
well, '22E, assistant athletic manager;
and George D. ("Bum")- Tramp, '23E,-
song leader.
Biologists Start Business'_
The biological camp, located about
one-half mile from us, has shown
Summer school students' headquart-
ers at Wahr's Book Stores.-Adv.

derstand it will open.officia
July 4, and after that the en
will steer clear of that side
lake, we are told.
The members of Camp DaV
hearty greetings to their broth
dents in Ann Arbor. While.V
home toil away in the class ro
roam about in the hot sun of
gan county.
SUMMER LECTURES SERIE
BEGINS THIS AFTF
(Continued from Page On
About Cancer". The medical
will be concluded 4(y Dean Hu
ot's address on "Stone in t
ney".
At 5 o'clock tomorrow af
Dean M. E. Cooley, of the E
ing college, will lecture on
Utilities", a subject upon w
has become an authority thr
the state. He has frequentl
called upon by the state gov
and private 'interests to
properties. Dean Cooley just
ed today from a meeting of th(
ty for the Promotion of Eng
Education, of which he was las
president.
The first of the concerts
faculty of the School of Mu
have been planned for every
day night during Summer scd
be given at 8 o'clock tomorrc
in Hill auditorium.
Mr. W. G. Coburn, superinte
schools in Battle Creek, will s
5 o'clock Thursday afternoon
Selection and Administrati
Gifted Children": Mr. Coburn
of the most progressive supe
ents of the state, according 1
Kraus, and his lecture will be
ticular interest to students o
tion.
A list of the lectures as a
for up to the end of last wee
tainable at the office of the
session. The program is su
revision, however, and the lis
vised up to date 'will be p
every week in The Wolverine
Large stock of text-books-
second hand at Wahr's.-Adv.

ORATORY

And!

LOSCOPICAL

* NEEDS
Supplied. at

4

"'"""

Loose-leaf note books-best
at Wahr's Book Stores.-Adv.

qualityf

t'
*. -

e Quarry

SECOND

-HAND

BOO

Prescription Store

versity Ave. and So. State St. E
PHONE 308

FOR ALL D-EPA RTMENTS
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS will find the Right Prices at

G. Claude Drake, Prop.,

l

W l

t.
3

H

R

U N I V E R S I'
BOOK STAR

TARRRB-EP. ..

Sm Serving Meals a yHome, 620 Oa land
A Mrs. Bert Mill,4r"(5 Doors fro
/~ _______

CHICAGO
Co
fly-
vh
shii
let
the
sat
the

S

GYN-

LAKE.
Bathing Suits
for JAJen

in all
cobo
tions.

the popular
r combina-

nsisting of two pieces--
-front trouser with
ite canvas belt', and
rt with patented ath-
Ic supporter attached-'
se are by far the most
isfactory garments on
market.

RECORD ENROLLMENT OF
MORE THAN 2,00 SEEN
(Continued from Page One)
rived in Ann Arbor despite the swel-
tering heat.
The great increase expected this
summer is due primarily to the finan-
cial depression throughout the coun-
try, according to Dean Kraus. The
factor that has attracted an increasing
number of students throughout a pe-
riod of,years to doing Summer session
work is the insistence that the Michi-
gan administration has continually
made for a standard type of work,
of a value and credit equal to that
offered during the regular session.
REHEARSALS START TONIGHT
ON SUMMER CHORAL UNION
George Oscar Bowen will conduct
the summer choral union this season
and rehearsals will be held at the
School of Music every Tuesday and
Thursday evening at 7 o'clock, begin-
ning .this evening. No examinations
for admissions will be required, but
members will be expected to attend
all rehearsals regularly. The chorus
vill participate in the last of the se-
ries of weekly concerts to be given
during the summer.'

30 Per Cent OFF

This includes fancy correspondence papers in GIFT BOXES, as well"
as many late numbers of Highland Linen, Crane Linen Lawn, Florence Hard-
ing Blue, etc.

S T

ATIONERY

f

a

FOUNTAIN PENS of best makes.
box of stationery or propelling lead pencil will be

Our "GYMLAKE" suits,
are all knit of the very
finest grade, heaviest
weight, pure worsted
yarns.
324 SO. STATE ST.

With each sale a 50-cent
given free of charge.

D.

M

()

r

r

1 1

a

(Second Floor)
SUMMER

17 Nl

Sk

e l

S

A r c a d

A'

L SUMMER

BUSY 3EE

OPEN ALL SUMMER

POPUL

Sodas
Candy
Canoe Lunches a

I

arry" ar

""
"Pres'", Prc

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