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August 25, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

road will be a
s coming from

.h
at

(

niversity Ave.

I

CRITIQUE
ByUG.). E.
BRUCE BARTGN
Sometime ago, to the great indigna-
tion of some of the local Heaven-sent,
I attempted to strip the false whisk-
ers from Dr. Frank Crane. In 'my
deep-dyed blasphemy I likened Bruce
Barton to the reverend spiggot. But
were I forced to read, the stuff written
by either of the two gentlemen I should
choose Barton. Barton plays less the
celestial legate, and unlike Crane,
does not often turn from the business
of telling people how to be happy to
affairs of lV~iteaure.
Nevertheless, while looking over the
corset advertisements in the July Wo-
man's Home Companion, I noticed that
Bruce, in a letter to the editor, had
compared himself, not unfavorably, to
Sinclair Lewis.=
"Orchard Street" Stories
It seems that a s'eries of stories' by
Barton had been running in the maga-
zine mentioned under the general
classification of "Orchard Street" stor-
ies. The similarity of this name with
"Main Street" (both terms containing
the word "street") had caused many
readers to write in, and it appears that
they strengthened the author's idea
that his stuff was greatly like that of
Sinclair Lewis. In fact, Barton goes
on to say, with some deference to the .
better known writer, that had not
"Main Street" appeared first, he, Bruce
Barton, would now be regarded as is
Lewis. -
It is far from my notion to praise
the well known "Main Street" at this
late stage of the game. I hope it is
sufficient to say that I think the book
is good, though I feel that several sup-
erior novels were published about the
same time. Nor do I encore the choice
of the public. Sinclair's popularity is
due to some phenomenon which I have
not yet been able to uncover.. In popu-
lar parlance, he became a "fad," along
with Einstein and psycho-analysis.
Barton's Claim Astonishing
But I digress; Barton's claim filled
me with amazement. I had known him
simply as the man who had been tell-
ing the people to wash their faces and
to lift their souls to the sun. I forgot
all about the toilette and Mellen's food
advertisements in hasty search for one
of the stories.
And pray, what 'did I find? I found *
that the old sob story of theunappre-
ciated, Civil war veteran was in print
for the nine millionth time, that the
story lacked'none of the archaic as-
pects to makeit popular, that the old
hero was greatly admired by the chil-
dren, that he was forgottenby the
rest, =that even his- own family looked
down on him. So far, not bad, though
rather shabby.
But is the poor old man going to
die a nonenity? On the contrary;
ly]emorial day rolls around and the old
codger is praised by the governor of -
the state for saving the country at
Gettysburg. Succeeding this the old
man pines happily away, and the en-
tire village snuffles in sorrow and re-
morse. The whole business might well
have been in the "American Boy."
Give Him Due Credit
Yet I must give Barton the credit
that is his due. s The governor was
shown as a crafty poliitican rather
than an admirer of the patriot and
soldier. In addition, Barton's tech-
nique is not. bad. Neither is Zane
Grey's.
But obtain a copy of the Woman's
Home Companion for July and look the
field over on your own accord; the
shampoo and yeast cake advertise
nients are really fine.

"POLLY

WITH A

LA S T

Starring

Captibating

INA CLAIRE

A Screen Presentation of the Brightest of her Daid Velasco Successes

AndA

Century

Comedy

"SOCIETY DOC

T 0 M 0 R R 0 W

A N D

S A TUR D A Y

Jesse L. Lasky Presents

ETH EL

C LAYTC

T W O

T IV[ E BS

in

William D.Taylor's
Pr oduct I*on

6 r

ealth

T O

I G H T
PA

A Paramount Picture

A drama of the carefree life of New
York's Greenwich Village. Of the
mad, futile life of New York's mil-
lionaires. And of the finer, truer
life that a young girl found when she
gave up wealth and fame and sought
for love. Written by the great au-
thor of "Midsummer, Madness."

.

OTHER ATTRACTIONS
A Vanity Comedy
"Wild and Willie"
Latest News - Orchestra
u tnnn unitttttu n un tt nnnns o unnttn ttutttttuntttt

2:00 -
For tho
feature

ght

SHOWS AT

2, 3:30, 7,

8:45

r Longer"

LAST TIME TODAY
WARREN KERRICAN
in ' .
"NUMBER 99 "
FRIDAY - SATURDAY
EUGENE O'BR IEN
in
"IS LIFE WORTH LIVING"

LAST TIME T(
B ERT LYT I
in
"THE MISLEADING
FRIDAY -SAT,URD
MAY ALLIS

Ave.

"EXT R

The

Shopping Center

Established in 1857

Water and
Ponchos,
nap Sacks,

Cans,

GLIMPSIN

t:

Serge,
Ponge
Outing
s priced
I Hats

Ave.

Women
Miss Marguerite Chapin, who has
been acting dean of women for theI
Summer session, will leave shortly for
Detroit where she will take up her
duties in the fall as teacher of Latin
in the Eastern Liggett school.
Miss Mildred Sherman, who has been
the assistant dean of women this sum-
mer, will take the place of Miss Chap-
in as Dean Myra B. Jordan's assist-
ant for the coming year. She left
yesterday morning for New York City,
where she will remain for a month
visiting Miss Hope Conklin, formerly
social . director of Hfelen Newberry
residence.
Miss Betty Lloyd will take the place
of secretary to Dean Jordan, which'
has been left vacant by the resigna-
tion of Miss Lucy Green.
Miss Helen Bishop, social director
of Helen Newberry residence, left re-
cently for her home in Forest Grove,

The Bargains For DOLLAR
Ready-To-Wear Shoppe
Plaited Skirts
Dame Fashion insists that plaited skirts are "le dernier
and hence no Fall wardrobe is complete without one. Our :
shoppe has an extensive showing of Fall models in plaited:
checks and stripes. All $5.95, $6.75, and $9.75 skirts will 1
week.

$1

Blouses
Crisp, fresh and new are the voile and organdie blouse
white and colors, regularly priced up to $3.50 which are m
Dollar Week, $1.00 each.
Second Floor

cri d

THIS
COLUMN
CLOSES
AT 3 P.M.

SHOES
Whether you want satin

pumps for

vith tails. Phone 761-M, or
t 336 S. State St., second
Re~waird. 251

dress wear or heavy shoes for street wear
you will find that our shoe department is
showing a complete line that includes all
types of shoes. During Dollar Week all
shoes, including new Fall models will
sell at $1 off.

LINGERIE
Wlite voile ca
in either pink, bl
pink voile with i
ribbon shoulder

with
ed on

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