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August 25, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1921-08-25

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THA

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1921.

r s ,

FATE UNCERTAIN

Owing to the confusion caused
by the destruction of the ZR-2
at Hull, England, Wednesday, it
is not known what members of
the crew of 60 officers and men
were aboard the ill-fated craft.
It was .reported that there were
21 Americans aboard.
Following is the list of the 15
officers:
Commander, L. H. Maxfield;
Lieutenant Commanders, V. N.
Bieg, E. W. Coil, H. W. Hoyt;
Lieutenants, R. W. Pennoyer, C.
G. Little, T. B. Null, J. B. Law-
rence, A. R. Houghton, M. H. Es-
terley, W. R. Taylor, J. H. Kygpr;
Epsigns, J. H. Hykes, W. J. Me-
dusky; Chief Machinist, S. S.
Halliburton.
a f

Ii

In

LEIGTO

OPENFALL TERM
rton Will Speak Both to Incoming
Freshman and Old Stu-
ents'

ASSEMBLY IS FIRST OF
KIND ATTEMPTED

HERE

inovation in the schedule of
for the first month of the fall
11 be the opening assembly of
to be held Monday night,
,in Hill auditorium. The meet-
have as its principal feature
rs nf welconme by PrAident,

CAUSE 1OF, WRECK - S 1 T
RUMOR THAT SHIP WAS STRUCT-
URALLY WEAE IS
DENIED
WAS LARGEST AIR
CRAFT EVER BUILT
Designed in England for U. S. Gov-
ernnent; Purely British
Throughout
Hull, England, Aug. 25. - The
cause of the explosion Wednesday
of the ZR-2, the huge dirigible which
Was built in England for the United
States government, may never be
known. A rumor had been afloat some
time before the tragedy that the ZR-2
was structurally weak, but this was
stoutly denied by all in authority.
Starting' from Howden Tuesday
morning on a test flight to Pulham,
thebig aircraft had been afloat for 34
hours, at times in bad weather, and
was returning to Pulham at the time
of the accident. While flying at about-
1,500 feet over Hull, spectators saw
the ZR-2 seemingly. buckle amidships
and pluffge downward over the city
and into the Humber river.
One Theory Given
. One theory of the disaster is that
while the ship's rudders were being
tested' the giant craft took a sharp
turn, which caused her framework to
buckler and that the explosion of a
gasoline taik completed the catas-
trophy. The actual cause, however,
may never be known.
The ZR-2 was the largest air vehi-
cle ever constructed and carried a
crew of 49 men. Its gas containing
capacity was 300,000 cubic feet larger
than that of the ex-German airship,
L-74, which was surrendered to Great
Britain under the terms of the Peace
treaty. The ZR-2 was designed for
naval purposes and the first impor-
tance was given to the attainment of
the greatest possible height, of the
machine, in order to obtain the best
ability for rapid climbing to high
altitudes.
Not.Copy of German Ships
It was the first airship of purely
British'design and not merely a copy
of German ships. The ,clas to which
.the ZR-2 belonged, and of which it
was to be a pioneer, was intended to
consist of four airships. Before work
upon them had progressed very far
the armistice intervened, and the oth-
er three ships of the class were can-
celled.
Passenger Height Record Smashed
Montevideo, Aug.- 25.-Capt. Larre
Borges, a military aviator, Tuesday
made what is claimed to be the Am-
erican altitude record for an aero-
plane carrying two passengers. His
machine rose to a height of approxi-
mately 22,000 feet.

KAPPA SIGS GET
LARGE NEW HOME
Purchase Hoover Estate for $110,000,
Is Rumor
Something new in the way of a fra-
ternity lodge was suggested yesterday
when one member of the Kappa Sigma
fraternity admitted that an option had
been secured on the Hoover property
just outside the.city limits on Wash-
tenaw avenue. Seventeen acres of
land are included in the property,
this feature being something that no
other fraternity can boast of, at least
in Ann Arbor.
The fraternity, which is at present
located at 823 East Kingsley, in-
tends to purchase the property and
convert the residence into a frater-
nity lodge. No statement wa made
concerning the plans made for the
use of the land connected with it.
Although neither of the interested
parties would make a statement, it is
understood that the sum involved is
in the neighborhood of $110,000.
ATHBOKEN DOCK
Broke Out Wednesday Night; Flames
Have Reached Coffins of Dead
Soldier
NEW YORK ANLi JERSEY CITY
FIREMEN HASTEN TO SCENE
Hoboken, N. J., Aug. 25.-The giant
liner Leviathan is threatened by fire
which broke out early Wednesday
night on army pier number five near
where the ship i docked, and the
flames have spread to adjacent piers
on which hundreds of bodies of sold-
ier dead are placed. Fanned by a
strong east wind, the flames spread
rapidly and soon -enveloped this struc-
ture, setting fire to the mast and some
of the wood work on the forward part
of the ship, and then blowing on to
piers foui' and six.
New York City fireboats were sum-
moned hurriedly, and are assisting lo-
cal firemen in fighting the fire, which
was still spreading at 7 o'clock thi
morning. Fire apparatus of Jersey
City and all municipalities in Hudson
county have also been called out.
The Leviathan, the largest passeng-
er steamer in the world, after her war
service in rushing thousands of Am-
erican troops to the battle zone, was
transformed into a mercy ship and
used to bring the greater portion of
the bodies of dead Americans from the
battle fields of Frnce. Hundreds of
the 'bodies imperiled in the fire Wed-
nesday on the negrby piers were
brought to New York aboard her.
The steamer brought 10,000 members
of the 85th division, which was or-
anized at .Camp Custer, to New York
in April, 1919, and the occasion was
designated Michigan day because of
the fact that 'a majority of the bodies
were those of Michigan men.

of 'thel

;nt Burton has called the as-
he first of its lind that has
mpted here, with the aim ofI
touch with students as sobu
>le during the school year.
ess will contain an appro-
assage to the incoming and
students, according to, Mr.
Buhr, assistant to the Presi-
I will outline the new and
atures of the ensuing year's

INCREASE IN TEACHING STAFF
NECESSITATED BY JUNIOR
CLASS
NO GAIN IN NUMBERS
OF FROSH ANTICIPATED

NEW ARRANGEME)
SULT OF ADV
STUDENT:
WOMEN WILL
UP IN G

PLANS MADE FOR NEW SYSTE BO NFALE
ENROLLMENT OF112,600ST

Freshman Groups in Medicine
Law Show Proportionate
Growth

and Those

Just Entering
Physical Exams B4
Paying Fees

It is estimated by Registrar Arthur
G. Hall that the total enrollment of
the University for the coming year
will approximate 12,000, a slight in-
crease over the past year. The fig-'
ures include the enrollment for this
Summer' Session, which has exceeded
that of any other former year.,
The prospects for the freshman reg-
istration, in both the Literary and
Engineering colleges show little in-
crease over the last two freshman
classes, as the number of applications
for admission has reached the same
point at the present time as was ev-
idenced at this time last year.
The freshman classes in both the
Medical and Law schols are expected
to 'show an Increase which will be in
proportion to the increase in the en-
rollment of the freshman class of two
years ago, when an overwhelmingly
large class entered the University the
largest in its history.'.
That the new requirement of one
year's work before admission will
have little effect on the size of the
enrollment of the Dental college is the
belief of the 'registrar, though there
may be a slight, decrease.
Due to the fact that so many new
instructors were -needed to care for
the unexpectedly large freshman class
of 1919, it 'will now be necessary to
make rather an unusual increase in
the ranks of professors and assistant
professors to accommodate the same
increase in this year's junior class.
ILLNESS PROVES FATAL TO.
INTENDED MEDIC STUDENT
Mrs. Louise Vore, wife of Hugh A.
yore, of 541 Elizabeth street, who came
here with the intentions' of entering
summer school and then this fall en-
rolling in the Medical school, died
Tuesday night after an illness of nine
weeks. She was 28 years old.
She is survived by her husband and
by her father, E. F. Vore, a mission-
ary in India, now on leave of absence,
in California. She also leaves two sis-
ters, Ethel, in India, and Bessie, in
Pasadena, Calif.
FEES: FOR, ME1.RED-
$2 IN ALL COLLEGES

Due to the prospective inc
the enrollment of the Unive
has been found necessary
registrar to change somewhat
tomary arrangements for the
ing. of students in the Liter
lege, at the same time makir
changes in the system of regi
The alterations which are
made in University hall will
impossible for the registra
women to take place- in the
the west of the registrar's, as
done in the past, for the roo
be made smaller and con.seqtq
will no longer be available
poses of registration. As a re
women wil register in Barbe
nasium. They will also pay t
in this building
May Send Men to Wateri
It is thought that it may b
sary for the registration of mi
transferred to Waterman
sium, but this cannot definite]
certained until the ..,changes
versity hall have been comple
payment of fees for men w
ploce in the gymnasium, the
last year, however.
The classification of freshi
be held in University hall,
ual.
A new feature in the plan
registration requirements fo
ing students will be introduc
physical and medical exa
which is required of all ne
dents will be given between
of registration and the pay
fees, in order that those w
obliged to withdraw because
erto .unknown disabilities ma
without the necessity of app]
the refund of fees. This exa
will be conducted in the re
gymnasiums.
School of EducatioiA Sept
The nev School of Educatic
is now separately organized,
its own registration in the
which have been made over
use on the lower floor of
hall.

wishes an opportun-
policies and to point
expected of the Un-
women, according to
s placed the assemb-
on Page Four)

TO

AGE(NCIES
DIF.
- Veterans'
government
reatly min-
. of all gov-

* Taft Selects Coll
Washington,- Aug. 2
Taft notified the st
Wednesday that he
John T. Hayford, of I
versity,,and Ora Mine
nell university, as th
arbiters provided for
derson treaty for del
boundary between Pa
Rica.

Was The Engineer ?Iethuselah?
Or Was He ierely -Casey Jones ?

ADVANCE MADE IN
EDUCATION AND,
CHARGES

PHYSICAL
UNION

s, of Seattle, director
romises. The day of
y, of divided author-
nernment's dealings
ice men is ended, he
es of long standing
ans will rapidly -dis-
for adjusting claims,
ical needs and of ed-
veterans,. is definite-
he law creating the
. It rests squarely
or rather than be-
risk insurance bu-
board for vocational
public health. serv-
;encies that formerly
independently.
of providing medical
ing hospitals, is re-
most difficult of all

(By G.D.E.) -
This morning the DeWitt Clinton
train came through Ann Arbor on its
return trip to ,New Yorl; from the
Pageant of Progress exposition at
Chicago. True to form The Wolver-
ine had an intelligent reporter on the
job. The thing was late, but he
waited..
Finally a squeaky whistle announc-
ed the arrival of "Americ'a's Most
famous train". Somehow or other
that whistle seemed familiar, All atf
once the reporter became a firm be-1
liever in reincarnation. He recalled
the barefoot days of 1831, when, as a
boy, he had watched the train puff
along the Hudson scaring the cows
so that they refused to give milk.
Ah, Those Memories!
But when the dinky little engine'
and its string of coaches crept into
sight memories came back so quick.
and fast that they brought smarting
tears to the reporter's eyes. ' He
knew darned well that he had seen
the whole business before. .
The queer smokestack, the shaky
wheels, the three rattling coaches,.the
chorus of creakings and bumnns be-

porter upon discovering the little old
coaches to be filled with a sad look-
ing outfit of persons dressed in at-
tire not more than 10' years back in
style. Such profanation! Those
birds ought to be ashamed of them-
selves. Where were the flouncy la-
dies' laces and the men's broad waist-
coats of the time when the Astors
'were ferreting rabbits for dinner?
Something: ought to be. done about it.
Horrors! a Milk Can!
Then, outrage of outrage! The
trainmen started to throw off "milk
cans, and someone heaved a crate of
chickens aboard. The reporter, by
this time uncontrollable, rushed down'
to tell the officials what he thought
about it. The sad little engine start-
ed to puff warningly that it was
about to move.
A regulation conductor came to the
steps of one of the old coaches and
yelled, "All aboard for Jackson!"
And-the train creaked around the
bend.
The reporter frothed at the mouthl
and shrieked questions and abuse at
the station master. Such sacrilege!
Such lack of respect for the things of

Fees for men in all colleges of the
University have been increased by the
Board of Regents for next year, the
outdoor physical education and Mich-
igan Union elements of the annual
fee for men having been advanced one'
dollar each.
Fees' for 1921-1922 are:
Matriculation fee for all colleges
and schools, Michigan men $10;. wom-
en 10; for non-resident men $25,
women $25.
Annual fee in the Literary college:
Michigan men $82, women $77; non-
resident men $107, women $102. Col-
leges of Engineering and Architec-
ture: Michigan men $97, women $92;
non-resident -men $122, women $117.
Medical school, Michigan men '$142,
women 137; non-resident men $202,
women $197. Law school, Michigan
men $107, women $102; non-resident
men $127, women $122.
College of- Pharmacy, Michigan men
$97, women $92; non-resident men
$122, women $117. Homoeopathic
Medical school, Michigan men $142,
women $137 7 non-resident men X202,
women $197. College of Dental Sur-
gery, Michigan men $142; women
$137; no-resident men $202, . women
$197. -Graduate school, Michigan men
$82, women $77; non-resident men

evelopeme
Arci tec
Subject ®0
"The reason why loc
developed as a local
because of the lack of
facilities, local mater
said Prof. Louis C. B
department of archite<
before the local Rotar
day.
"Since steam transpo
advance of machinery,
considerable, slump i]
tural character of al
'of building," he conti
materials which were
by hand were later m
machinery. This re
death of craftsmanshi

are

plained
tects ha
ture of
books

't

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