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August 07, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-07

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/

I

00

Uinlurriur

AT YOUR DC
THREE TI
A WEEK

I

ANNARBOR, MICHIGAN, VOL. XI. No. 20.

PRICE FIVE

6

3

ANCE

TO '24ERS
I Receive One,
ii Songs,
itlons
an Bibles are
iversity 'Y for
Lcoming fresh-
changes have.

es are being
arlings, one
idual in the
aining 2,000
iools in the
Ler universi-
more elabo-
nd the make-
at. Changes,
tents, which
traditions,
expected of

so, been
to the,
Baxter,
Chris-
active

Ann
it.

Given In
Vaudeville
if. C)
:ience a taste of the
and music of many
and Asiatic coun-
politan club vaude-
ght in Sarah Caswell
d to be a unique suc-

CHANGE IN UNION
PLANNED FOR FALL,
No successor to George Hurley, gen-
eral secretary of the Union who re-
tires to private business Sept. 1, hav-
ing been found yet, it is probable that
the office will be declared temporar-
ily vacant and the budget turned over
to the offices of general manager and
president for expenditure.
The duties of the office will also be
divided between the two positiono.-
The additional money to be derived
from this source will be expended
with the view of greatly extending the
student activities of the Union. A-
thorization of this proposed - move-
ment will have to be given by the
board of governors before ft will be
official.
Some difficulty is being experienced
by the Union in finding a suitable
mait4o succeed Hurley, so that the
proposed step will permit ample time
for the seat*ch and make certain that
a good man is found.
SEERAL CHANGES MADE
IN LECT- PRGR
ENTERTAINMENTS THIS WEEK
MOST COMPLETE AND
GOOD
Several changes and additions to the
program of entertainments next'week
'have been made. Every 5, and 8 o'clock
is now filled, and the program prom-
ises to be one of the most complete
and best of the summer.
Mr. Ray K. Imme 's class in story
telling will have an o en hour for:chil-
dren at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon in
room 302, Mason hall. At 5 o'clock on
the same day, "The Part-Time School,
or Coinecting School with Employ-
ment," will be dealt with by Prof. G.
E. Myers of the industrial education
department of the University.
The 'class in interpretative reading,
directed by Prof. R. D. T. Hollister,
will give selections from Tennyson at
8 o'clock Monday evening in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. '
Tuesday Prof. A. L. Cross of the his-
tory department, a specialist in Eng-
lish affairs, talks on "Recent British
Policies in India." At 8 o'clock is the
weekly medical lecture, which will be
givei by Dr. . G. Van Zwaluwenburg.
"Some Problems of Americanization
as Seen by an Army Psychologist" is
the new subject whichProf. C. S. Berry
of .the psychology department, has
chosen. He did much work in the
army during the war along these lines.
The regular concert of the Sohool of
Music faculty will be at 8 o'clock Wed-
nesday evening in Hill auditorium.
Prof. W. A. Paton's lecture on "In'.
come Tax Procedure" has been
changed to 5 o'clock Thuraday after-
noon, and at 7 o'clock there will be
educational motion pictures with an
informal lecture upon "The Element
of Beauty from the Public Standpoint"
by Miss Emma Grattan at 8 o'clock.
An art exhibition will follow.
13ith the date and subject of Prof.
David Friday's lecture have been
changed, and he will now talk at 5
o'clock Friday afternoon on "The Pres-
ent Day Industrial Situation." Being
an authority upon economic questions,
Mr. Friday will probably speak to a
large audience. In the evening at 8
o'clock Prof. C. P. Wagner has a lec-
ture on "Spanish Gypsy Folk Songs."
CHRI TIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
TELLS MUSIC SCHOOL'S WORK

The "Christian Science Monitor" of
July 16, contains elaborate mention
of the activities of the University
School of Music. Particular emphasis
is given to the work of Dr. Stanley,
who has been in charge of the school
since its organization about' 30 years
ago and to th world-wide influence
which the institution has had upon
the development of mausic in this coun-,
try and abroad.

NAIONALSPIRIT
DOMINAT-ENLEY,
Is Supmme Factor in Real Civiliza.
tion, Declares Philosophy
Professor
GREAT CAUSE FOR WORLD'S
ADVANCE RECENTLY, HE SAYS
National spirti is the dominant and
supreme factor in real civilization,
according to Prof. Robert M. Wenley,
who spoke on "Nationalism," in the
Natural Science auditorium, Thursday
evening. Every seat was taken when
he began his discourse. . -
He declared that nationalism is pri-
marily a matter of psychical factors;
spirit, temperament, art, morals, and
religion; that it is a social question,
a relation of all members of the group
to one another at all moments of their
lives.
Nationalism pauses Advance
That the nineteenth century was the
era in which 90 per cent of the world's
knowledge came to light, and that
nationalism was the basio cause or
this advance, were the assertions of
Professor Wenley. He said also, that
Pan-Slavism, Irredentism, the New-
Greek movement, ,the Polish move-
ment, and many other movements in
national ideals and traditions, even
the mythical something called Celtic-
ism, came during this era, the one
that brought forth inventions which
have altered the whole reign of hu-
man life,
"There is no pure race, as' far as we
know," said the speaker in discarding
'race' as-an ifluence, but he contend-
ed that 'place' is a vital factor, not as
'a matter of quantity; of population
and area, but of quality of spirit. An-
other influence of place," he added,
"is the lines along which culture may
travel."
Professor Wenley further asserted
that such things as climate were of
great importance in building habits
of irrevocable character, but that
these things have influence not ,mere-
ly upon physical things but on pur
very temperament.
Internal Spirit Influences
Internal spirit, the sirit of co-oper-
ativeness, is the greatest influence in
nationalism, in the opinion of the
speaker, and is more important than
each man to himself, than others as
viewed by-him, and even more im-
portant than the external world, the
physical forces. In connectidn, Pro-
fessor Wenley explained that nation-
al spirit depends upon the past of the
country, and that it is adamant to
opinions, ecclesiastic standpoint, eco-
nomic interests, and politics.
Evidence of the forces of national-
ism was pointed out to th audience,
from the time of the Athenian rule,
when 17 of the world's greatest men
were contemporaries in a small group
of thirty thousand souls.
w Among the things distracting to na-
tional spirit are flatulent conceptions
of democracy, the desire to possess
(Continued on Page 4)

'2 MICHIGA9N 6RADS
START__MAGAZINE
New Publelatlon Will Be "America.
Collegian"; First Issue To
Be In Fall
WILL APPEAL TO ALUMNI,
FACULTY, UNDERGRADUATES
Of especial interest to undergrad-
uates, alumni, and faculty of American
universities will be the new maga-
zine which is to be launched by two
Michigan graduates as "The American
Collegian."
The business manager, whose name
has not been divulged, is, a member of
the class of- '18, and the editor, Mark
K. Ehlbert, is one of this year's grad-
uates. It is understood, also, that one
of the largest printers in Chicago,
where the magazine is to be faublish-
ed, is supporting the enterprise.
Ehlbert leaves Ann Arbor Thurs-
day for Chicago where he will begin
the organization of the editorial de-
artment of the magazine. The first
issue, he stated, would appear in the
fall.
"'The American Collegian' is to be
a magazine for college people,"fsaid
Ehlbert, yesterday. "We will aim to
make it representative of the progres-
sive elements among the undergrad-
uate, alumni, and faculty groups. This
end is to be attained through articles
from representative contributors.
"The threefold appeal will, of,
course, necessitate a division of the
magazine into certain departments,'
but we hope to, have the material pre-
sented in such away as to have a
general rather than limited apeal."
Ehlbert also outlined extensive
plans for a subscription campaign
which is to be opened this fall in every
college and university .in the couittry.
"Frankly,. we anticipate little dif-
ficulty as to circulation," he said.
"'The Amercian Collegian' is to oc-
cupy a rather unique position among
the periodicals of this country, de-
signed as it is only for those who have
some interest in the collegiate world."

DEL TORO TELLS OF
CUBAN PROGRESS
The great progress that has been
made in Cuban life and industry dur-
ing the last '20 years has been due to
the co-operation and influence of 'the
United States, declared Julio del Toro,
of the IDepartment of Romance Lang-
uages, in his illustrated lecture given
in Spanish yesterday-' afternoon on
"Cuba Since the War Between Spain
and the United States." He told of the
school systems 'that were introduced
by the Americans, and the programs
for better roads begun under their di-
rection.
Sine the close of the World War,
Mr. del Toro said, there has been in-
creased activity in Cuban industry.
More than 350 new corporations have
been established to do business in the
island with a capital of half a billion
dollars. During the last few months4
commerce has been so heavy in the
harbor of Havana that it is almost<
impossitile for ships to pass in and
out.
The importance of the sugar and to-
bacco crops' was discussed and pic-1
tures were shown of tobacco and cane,
fields and the factories where these<
products are handled. 'Views of his-
toric Spanish architecture and an-
cient Spanish guns in the city of San-
tiago were shown. Numerous views
of Havana were presented, including
pictures of the harbor, street scenes,
and public buildings.
NEW RELATION HOPE
LIESITH STUDENTS
IS WELL CONCEALED IF PRESENT
TODAY, DECLARES MIN.
ISTERf
The only hope for new international
relationship lies with the students of1
today who are faithful to their native
land but who at the same time have
,a growing consciousness of world cit-
izenship. Scuh was the statement of
Dr. L. C. Douglas, pastor of the Con-
gregational church, in his address1
Thursday evening, on "The New Rela-
tion Among Nations.
"If there is a new relation among
nations," he said, "the tact has been
well concealed. The United States
has made no recent strides to a new
relation with sister states. We are
still technically at war with Germany
over a differencepractically settled
in November, 1918. At the present
moment with 10 wars in progress and
stable government over a great part
of Europe in a condition of chaos, the
world problem is highly complicated.
Whatever han4 God may have had in
the war, the devil seems to be making
the peace," said' Dr. Douglas.
Moral Slump Comes
"At the time of the armistice there
was a great moral slump among the
nations that had been'engaged in the
war," he continued. "There is cleav-
ages amiong. the allies now, cleavage
among the central Powers, and cleav-
ages among the lesser nations. Just
now we are disliked and suspected
in every nation all over the world.
"We are not as far progressed to-
ward new international relations no'v
as we were in 1910, and the present
generation has practically nothing to
offer in solution of the problem of
world brotherhood," stated the speak-
er. , It is only by the leadership of
the students of today who are faith-
ful to their country and also conscious
of world citizenship that this genera-
tion may assist the next generation to
acc6'mplsihment. The new relation

must be on a moral basis, for all
others have failed.
Little Gain Expected
Little gain in the direction of a
new relation among nations is to be
expected from either of the, major
parties or their candidatees, accord-
ing to Dr. bouglas. Commerce, char-
acterized today by repacity and greed,
can contribute little.
Discussing our immediate problems,
(Continued on Page 4)

ire the performance began, F.
. as master of ceremdnies gave
rt talk on the aims and ideals
Cosmopplitan club as a nation-
ganization. Two Chinese songs,
I on typical musical instru-
by P. C. Kwok and T. M. Sau
China, opened the program. Fol7
this number was a dainty and
ul Japanese dance by Miss Os'-
She ; wore a gorgeous orange
o and interreted the fan dance
manner of the Japanese Geisha
Young, ex-presdient of the
next presented a group of songs
costume of a gypsy girl, ac-
nied on the piano by Miss Mim-
liss Young's excellent soprano
together with her rendition of
ngs made the act one of the best
e program. Several mandolin
by Mr. Elk nd of Russia, show-
ability on t instrument. The
>f his numbers was a Russian
long and according to Mr. El-
ypical of their sombre intbrpre-
of music.
e Flirtation Dance" as practised
natives of the Philippines was
d by Mr. Capistrano and Miss
. This graceful dance, showing
>ve-making of two young Phil-
s was executed extraordinarily
Mr. Capistrano also gave sever-
ive songs in Spanish. The last
er on the program was an ex-
)n of Japanese wrestling and jiu
>y N. Ohtonio and S. Kastuigumi.
EE MICHIGAN GRADUATES
CORPORATE DRUG COMPANY
-ee Michigan graduates are in-
I in the incorporation of 'the
ns-Fletcher Drug Co., which'
ecently authorized. E. C. Calk-
86, Gilbert W. Fletcher, '12, and
Gibson, '17, are the parties.
ler the incorporation Mr. Calk-
ill be president and treasurer,
letcher, general manager, and P.
bson, the secretary. L. A. Wikel
made vice-president. Three
sare operated by this concern,
t State street and North Univer-
>ne at East University and South

56,FOOTBALL Ml
ASKED BACK ~
36 WILL RETURN SEPT. 15,
WILL COME WEEK
LATER

BILLIARD PLAY
APPROACHES END
Continuing play in the Union three
cushion billiard tournament is bring-
ing it to the end. In one of the best
matches ever played in the Union bil-
liard room, Gornall defeated Moore
Thursday night, 25-16.
Last night White defeated Tsi in a
close game, the score running 25-23.
The winner of this match is engaging
MacGregor to determine which one
enters the semi-final round. Snodgrass.
and Merry are playing off a match to-
day, the winner of which will meet
Gornall in the semi-finals. It .is ex-
pected that the finals will be reached
by Monday evening.
Al Taylor, Union professional who
has charge of the billiard rdom in the
regular year, is in the city for a few
days before returning to Chicago
where he will meet McAndless next
Saturday night in an 18.2 balk line,
match. McAndless defeated him in the
first contest, but Taylor is hoping to
come back this time.
The Union billiard tables are now
being looked over and repaired, and
when fall opens it is expected that all
of them will be in first-class condition
for play,
MAC KAYE TO BE PRtOFESSOR
BUT NOT REQUIRED TO TEACH
Percy MacKaye, who gave an au-
thor's reading here this week, will
hold the unique position of being a
professor at Miami University, Ox-
ford, 0., without the necessity of
teaching any classes. The Univer-
sity authorities there are paying him
a full salary, giving him a home, and
all that is required of him is to con-
tinue his wofk with the drama.

SEVEN MENTORSWILL
.ASSIST COACH Yo
Heavy Schedule Confronts Wolvei
Eleven; Maddock Volunteers
to Help Hurry-Up
Fifty-six invitations to return
early fall football practice on Fe
field have been sent out to as m
candidates for the 1920 Varsity, an
number of replies have already b
received.
Of this number 36 have been as
back for Sept. 15, and the other
will come Sept. 22, which will give
of them plenty of practice for the f
game with Case Oct. 7. It is expe
that these early turnouts will be s
plemented by more than a hund
candidates, who will come out w'
school first opens.
The men askd to return Spt.
are: Goetz, Dunne, Vick, Wien
Steketee, Usher, Wilson, Perrin, Col
Nelson, Peare, Rye, Paper, Cap
Walter, Goebel, Roland, Andre
Banks, Van Orden, Searle, Bailey,
ton, Hulse, Avery, Trout, Stipe, S
mcons, Leader, Durbin, Dunn, R
Hayden, Wachter, and Johns.
Those asked back for Sept. 22 a
Wilson, Campbell, Brace, Kullu
Woolcott, Klepser, Martin, Bigel
Planck, Wedthoff, McEllren, Whee
BrenneKreis, Gurevich, Petro, Co
Kahn, elhiar, and Wheelan.
Ten Are Veterans
Ten of this list are veteians, ha
won their "M" in previous years,
only five of them played on last ye
team. Captain Goetz, Dunne, V
Rye, and Wilson were members of
1919 aggregation, and Steketee,.
Americanfullback, Usher, Cohen,
Perrin were backfield men in 1
Wieman, a tackle, was captain-ele
1918, but entering the service, he
not return.
With these 10 veterans as a nuc
and a host of men coming from
freshman team, Coach Yost and'
corps~ of assistants will endeavor
regain Michigan's prestige on the g
iron' A hard schedule confronts
Wolverine outfit, Case, Michig n
gies, Tulane, Illinois, Ohio State,
cago, and Minnesota being metE
cessively each week from Oct. 7.
In, the center of the line it is p
able that the newcomers will find.:
culty in replacing Vick, all-Wesi
center in 1918, who played out of
position most of last year. At gi
the only old man returning wiIl
Wilson, who is a little light but
is a tough scrapper. From the fr
man team there come several
husky men, who look like guard '
rial.
Two Good Tackles
For tackles Michigan apparently
two of the best in the West in G
and Tad Wieman. Both of them
large fellows, and know the game
A to Z. With Rye returning for n
Michigan has two fine flankers, Di
completing the pair, and Goebel of
freshman eleven, is touted as a
who will give either of them a t
for their positions.
Four veterans, Cohen, Stek
Usher, and Perrin, will all be fo
competing for backfield positions
year, the same as they did In I
In Steketee, Yost will have a pu
and place kicker, who can hardl;
beaten, and his.work in spring p
tice shows that he has lost none 0:
skill in sending spirals more tha
yards, which won him a place
Camp's all-American aggregatiov
1918.-
Jack Dunn appears to be one o
best bts for the quarter position
though there are several other

men out for this place. In his fr
man year. Jack tore up the field aga
the Varsity, and made quite a nam
himself.
Other Good Material
In addition to the letter men, t
is an abundance of good. mat
which will undoubtedly be devel
in great shape., Exactly how Mich
(Continued on Page 4)

Whitmore Outing
EndsCosmo Week
eosmopolitan 'week will end this
afternooi, after an'auto ride and out-
ing of the club at Whitmore Lali.
Approximately 35 members will meet
at Lane hall at 2 o'cock, and golto
Whitmore, where they will swim, con-
test in games, and have a basket din-
ner.
Prof. 3. C. Hildner stated that the
week end of the Cosmopolitan club
had been most successful and its of-
ficers were well satisfied with the re-
sults. Friday afternoon there was a
reception for members of the club at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick
Stevens.
About 35 students were at the re-
ception, and 14 countries were rep-
resented.

N

i

OPEN AIR

CAMPUS' SERVICE

SUNDAY 7:30 P. M.

SPEAKER: Rev. Sidney S. Robins
ON THE LIBRARY STEPS - IF RAIN, IN LANE HALL

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