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July 31, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AND SLIGHTLY
EMER TODAY

I

Wilurrinr

rim

THREE TIM
A WEEK

:'

N Tr VnT TO

17.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 31, 1920.

PRICE

I

PRICE

RFIEL OETS
R LEASE ON
DCE THEATER

adison Receives
*.Atenorah Award

I

BEEN UNDER
SOME

Charles Allan Madison, '21, has been
awarded the Menorah prize of $100 for
the year of 1919-1920 by the committee'
of adjudication, consisting of Rabbi
Franklin of Detroit, Prof. I. Leo Sharf-
man, and Prof. R. M. Wenley, chair-
man.
Subjects for the coiipetition, which
is open to all students of the Univer-
sity, of 1920-1921, will be announced
in the fall, and it is elpected that the
essays will have to be in'in November.
The prize is given each year by Mr.
Rosenthal, of the Sears-Roebuck-com-
pany, for the best essay, written by a
student on any of the announced gen-

PRESENT SY ST EM More Entries For
'Tourney Needed
EN T ; g I N A DT 9SAYUnless four more students sign up '
for either the three cushion or straight
rail billiard tournament, the Union
O F1 will have to abandon its plans for a
Am~ Ar ~Trr 1 d1t rm Yr~ iv meet this summer. Entrance fees will

All persons who expect to com-
plete the requirements for a de-
gree by the end of the present
Summer session, should secure the
necessary blanks from, the secre-
tary of their department, fill them
out, and hand them back as soon
as possible. These blanks must be
filled out before diploma fee may
be paid, which should be done as
soon' as possible.

}

( CANDID:V(ES FOR
DEGREE, NOTICE.

SPECIAL NUMBER o OMP[T
CLUB ON PROC h9

l

TIMEJJ

IIAVE,
RECENT

A A YLITIClA.NS
SEEN BUDGET'
FAULTS
BILL GREAT

-Iz,

MANAGEMENT TO
KE CONTROL SEPT. 1;
in, Name and Electric Sign
uong Changes, Rumored to
Take Place
Arcade theatre, the campus
picture show house on North
sity avenue, has been leased for
d of 10 years by W. S.Butter-
f Battle "Creek, who operates
estic theatre on Maynard street.
w management will take con-,

ADyANCE, HE STATES
Would Bring About Intelligent Organ.
ization of Various Departments
of Government.

be refunded, if the required number is
not reached by 4 o'clock Monday after-
noon after.which time the tournament
will be definitely given up.
For the remainder of the summer,
the Union billiard room will open at
12:30 o'clock instead of 11 o'clock, but
it will continue to be open until 11
o'clock in the evening. Robert Snod-
grass, '23, who is in charge of the
room, will give free instruction to any
beginners in the game.
Immediately following the end of the
Summer session, the billiard room will
be closed up, and all the tables will be
put in shape for the fall.

|
|
I

WILL BE FEATURES OF
WEEK'S LECTURE
SCHEDULE

ENGINEERING PROFS.
MAKING APPRAISAL

NJ

PERCY MAC KEY WILl
FILL HIS ENGAGEMEI
Choral Union Concert, "A Curious 3
hap," Scott's Talk, and Sellar's
Lecture Conplete'Bill

eral topics.
Professor Wenley in announcing the
award of the prize, stated that there
was a small number competing for the
honor, ,when with such a large reward
there should be about 100 entered in
the contest.

iations for the theatre have
nder way for some time and
'ere other parties, who wished
e it, one of these being a large
production corporation.
Plans Not Decided
.s as to futhre plans and
of the new house have not as
n decided upon, but it is ru-
hat the name will be changed
electric sign will be erected.
unt-Artcraft pictures will Be
., and all shows at the new
'ill be kept up to the standard
rfield theatres, which 'are 10-
roughout the state.
. A. Moran, owner of the Ar-
hen questioned regarding the
ion, said that the amount, ex-
w much he declined to state,
him made it feasible for him
e from active management -of
e. His Shortha'nd school which
d in the block needs his atten-
d he plans to spend most of
in building it up and putting
nore-modern basis.
Started in 1914

KARPlNSKI GIVES
LIVINIG STATISTI'CS
Presents Figures on High Costs For
Teachers Dwelling in Cities
Which Pay Poorly

A

cade theatre was first
oran in 1914, having;
ating capacity of 550.

started
at that
It was

i in this size for three years.
time recently completed im-
ents were started that gave it
ng capacity of 1,200 people.
akes it the largest privately
heatre in the city.
Tel 's Reading
, Play. Pleases
(By G. K. E.)
every seat in Sarah Caswell
hall taken,' Ray K. Immel, of
rtment of oratory, read George
-'Shpw's play, "The Devil's Dis-
'riday evening.
cing the rendition with a few
to set the scene, Mr. Immel
d the reading, impersonating
'acters and making each dis-
in voice. Although by neces-
e speaker barely outlined the
is introductory note, there was
>ubt by those who heard the
as to the real character of
he audience was especially de-
with the way, in which Mr.
.andled Shaw's genial drollery,
very speech provoking laugh-
V.
nmel stated that "The Devil's
"is considered by many as the
best' 4ay, it being the least
eto the orthodox churchman
y' as humorous as any other of
ks. George Bernard Shaw,,ac-
to= Mr. Immel, is considered by
eeryone as famous, or infa-
hiefly because of his 'stand on

SHOULD GIVE INFORMATION
IN HIGHER PAY CAMPAIGN
Presenting statistics on the increase
in the cost of living and on the com-
parative increase in wages for rail-
road men and factory workers, Prof.
L. C. Karpinski, of the mathematics
department, in his lecture on "Teach-
ers' Salaries and the Cost of Living,"
yesterday. afternoon gave information
for teachers in communities where an
adequate campaign has not yet b'een
made to increase salaries, and out-
lined the most effective method by
which increases are to be obtained.
Dollar Bill Shorter.
"The dollar bill looks much shorter
now than it did in 1914," he said.
"According to statistics, the cost of
living in Detroit has increased 139 per
cent since 1914. This means that the
dollar now will' buy only 41 cents
worth of any commodity as compared
with 1914. In some place the increase
has been about TOO per cent, making
the average increase approximately;
120 per cent."
It is hoped the peak has been
reached,Ibut the decline isdnot in
sight. Increased prices and high
wages,"resuitng from the' law- ofsup-
ply aind demand, are by-products of
the waj. The cost of living is.a com-
plicated matter. It differs in various
parts of the cquntry and for differeit
individuals.
Must Pay. Good Salaries
"If teachers are to make a campaign
for increased salaries, they should1
have information available that will
be educational as to the future of the
comnuiity. The only way to get de-1
sirable teachers is to pay proper sal-I
aries. The teachers should submit fig-
ures on the local increase in cost ofP
living and on the increases that havej
been given labor in the community tof
meet the rising prices. Teachers dur-
ing the period of the war 'have not re!
ceived proportionate increases. - I
"A salary campaign, should aim at
establishment of a proper salary mini-w
(Continued on Page 4)1

Declaring that there has been public
misconception concerningsupposed
Congressional extravagance, Prof. J.
R. Hayden, of the political science de-
partment, in his discussion of the
problem of the national budget Thurs-
day afternoon, said that proposed bud:
get reforms aim at efficiency in gov-
ernmental administration as well ,as
economy.
"Records show that in the last 20
years there have beenfew cases where
estimates have been increased by con-
gressional committees, and in most in-
stances they have been greatly re-
duced," he said.
$ystem Inadequate
"Politicians and statsesmen have
known that our so-called budget 'sys:
tem is inadequate. Appropriations are
not made in the best way, and the
process of checking the budget is
faulty," he 'continued. "The budget
bill passed by Congress and vetoed by
President Wilson in the closing days
of the last session because of one fea-
ture regarded as unconstitutional, was
a tremendbus step, in advance."
The problem of national budget, ac-
cording to Prof. Hayden, is not merely
one of sources of revenues but also of
expenditures and appropriations and
the metl od of accounting for govern-
nient funds. In past procedure each
bureau has made its own estimate of
expenses for the succeeding year. As7
a result of this system, bureau chiefs
ask for about double the sum they ex-
pect, knowing Congress will pare their
padded figures down. Discussing the
procedure of -appropriations in the
House, he said estimates are split1
among sevdral committees.
Committee Makes Report
Only those estimates not otherwise
provided fo are handled by the appro-{
(Continued on Page 4)
PutIn-W ay TParty
Leavee For :Tripx

51.'700 RAISED FOR'
CHINESEMEET-ING
Various Organizations In This Vicinity
Aid in Making Convention in
September.a Success
BAZAAR OF EMBROIDERY, ART,
PORCELAIN, i7ILL BE FEATURE
Various Chinese organizations in
this vicinity have raised amore tian
$1,700 to aid in making the Mid-West-
ern Chinese convention, which will be
held here the first week in September,
a success.
One thousand dollars of this amount
was raised by the financial committee
of the Conference, under the leader-
ship of K. L. Wu, '21E, who canvassed
Chinese merchants in Detroit and
Toledo. The co-operation of the local
Chinese Students' club and the Chinese
Students' club of Detroit with the com-
mittee was a large factor in the suc-
cess' of the drive, according to those
in charge.
Local members of the conference
raised a subsidy fund of $300 to enable
members at a great distance to attend
the meeting. This was also done to
show the members of other schools
the common interest that is manifest.
in all members of the Conference, ac-,
cording to local officers.
In order. that the whole delegation
might visit Detroit and make an in-
spection of the industrial plants of
that city and also to provide enter-t
tainment for them while there, the'
Chinese Students' club of Detroit have
raised $350. This trip will be male
September 7.
(Continued on Page 4)
GREAT DIFFICULTY FOUND IN
.FILLING TEACHING PLACES {

Doubles play in the Summer session
tennis tournament reached the semi-
finals, when Custer and Stull won their
match 6-4, 6-4. The only other games
in the doubles were won by Bowers
and Sanchez from Brown and Stevens,
the score being 610, 610.
The results of the third round play
in the singles are: Merkel won from
Clippert, 6-2, 14-12;' Anderson defeat-
ed Harris, 6-2, 6-3; Greenwood beat
Brown, 6-2, 6-3; Sanchez won from
Workman, ,6-2, 6-2; Burley defeated
Underwood, 6-4, 6-0;; Beddow beat
Ohlmacher, 6-1, 7-5; and- Wfifte won
from Kayser, 6-2, 6-4
Withonly a short time for play re-,
maining, Dr. May has urged all the'
competitors to complete their matches
as soon as possible. It is expected that
the tournament will be over by the end
of next week at least..;
PROF. MYERS' CLASS VISITS.
DETROIT SCHOOL YESTERDAY
The class in compulsory part-time
schools, under the direction of Prof.
George Myers, head of the department
of industrial education, yesterday vis-t
ited. the continuation schools of..De-
troit, which are conducted at the Bur-
ton and Cass Technical schools.
In the afternoon the students from
here and those of Detroit repaired to
Belle Isle where they had supper,.af-
ter which the Michigan students re-
turned to Ann Arbor.
The classes at both the Burton and
Cass Technical schools are under the
direction of the department here. Miss
Cleo Murtland is associate professor,
Mr. E. Louis Hay is assistant profes-
,sor, and F. R. Keppler is an instructor.

The complete inventory and ap-
praisal of the Consumers' Power com-
pany of Grand Rapids, which the com-
pany is making of its physical prop-
erties, are in general charge of Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley, Prof.,H C. Ander-
son, and Prof. H. E. Riggs, all of the
engineering faculty.
Prof. C. H. Fessenden, Prof. King,
R. C. Eastman, and L. Boyce are
handling the work in connection with.
the steam plants, sub-stations, hydrau-
lic plants, and transmission lines.
The company is employing a force
of almost 200 men, most of whom are
from the University, and headquarters
have been established in the old-Y. iN.
C. A. building in Grand Rapids.

CUSTER AND, STULL
OPPONENTS BY 6.4,
SCORE'

DEFEAT
6.4,

The feature of the program for t
coming week will be the special C(
mopolitan numbers, which will
given Thursday and Friday T
subimer school officials have decid
to give these, numbers on account
the fact that -Michigan is knowi as
school where all nations are rep
sented and on account of the increa
ing importance of a better concepti
of one nation in regard t the others.
The first lecture to be given in t:
connection is "The New . Relati
Among Nations," which will be deli
erea by Ir. L. 0. Dolglas at 5 o'clo
'Phursda afternoon. That evening
7 o'clock there will .be edpucation
moving pictures. 'At 8 o'clock Pr
Ropert, M. Wenley, head of the ph:
osophy department, 'will talk on "N
tionalism."
Del Toro to Speak
The following afternoon Mr. Jul
del Toro, of the Spanish departmen
will give a lecture in Spanish
"Cuba-Despues dle la Guerre Ent:
Espanay los Estados Unidos," whi
means "Cuba, after the Spanish-Ame
ican War." This will be the ecox
lecture that will be delivered in a fo
eign language this summer.
That evening the Cosmopolitan c
will put on an entertainment of a pI
ular nature, probably in the form
a vaudeville show. These c6smopol
tan entertainments will be under ti
charge of the Cosmopolitan club a
Prof. J. C. Hilclner, who is in char
of.the committee on foreign students
MacKaye Will Coma
Percy MacKaye, the dramatist
reader who was unable to fill his .e
gagement here last Thursday night a
account of a train wreck, will give h
reading at 7 o'clock Wednesday nigh
The School of Music concert will b
given at 8:15 o'clock instead of
o'clock as is customary.
The concert to be given this wee
will feature the Summer School Chor
Union under thodirection of Prof. Ea:
V. "Moore. It will presentselectior
from "Fair Ellen" (Brud) .and fro
"The Golden Legend', (Sllivan). A
tists, who will assist in the progra
are Mrs. Graae Johnson Konald, s
prano;' Rober Dieterle, baritone; an
Anthony J. Whitmire, violinist.
Introduce Innovation
In presenting ."A Curious Miha;
Monday and Tuesday evening in Sara
Caswdn Angell hafl, .there will be a
innovation in the production of a sun
mer play. The usual custom has bee
to secure for a period of days, sin
professional players, such as the Be
Greet actors.
This year, however, the play will b
given by summer school students in ti
class of play production. The chan
was made because it Was'hought the
ne mbers of this class would be ab]
to secure valuable experience 'in pla
production, which could be used to a
advanitage in directing high scho
theatricals. An admission willli
charged for the play, which will bc
given under the direction, of Prof.F
D. T. Hollister.
Scott Comes
Monday afternoon, L. F. Scott, "
New York City, one of the national o
ficers of the Camp Fire Girls, will te
of the importance of the Camp Fir
movementinmodern education. Tues
day afternoon, Prof. R. W. Sellars, o
the' philosophy department, will spea
on "Democracy in Literature." "Th
lecture on wireless communication wi
be given in the West Lecture room c
the physical laboratory, by Prof. N. B
IWilliams, of the physics department..
LARGE NUMBER OF COUPLES
ATTEND WEEKLY UNION DANC

Approximately 130 couples, the larg
est lumber~ this summer, attended thc
weekly'Union dance last night. Georg
Roderick, '21E, and Knight Mirielee
'21E, were the committee in. charge.

The party for Put-in-Bay left this
morning via the Michigan Central rail-
road and the interurban for Detroit,
where the, large excursion steamer,
"Put-in-Bay," was boarded for a trip
through the Detroit river and Lake
Erie to the island, "Put-in-Bay,"
Mr. F. W. Frostic went on the Michi-
gan Central and Prof. I. D. Scott tool
the interuriban. These men who looked
after the details of the trip, were the
ones responsible for the success of the
Niagara Falls trip, which was made'
earljer in the summer.
The success of these excursion trips
which are planned to be 'interesting.
both from an educational and recrea-
tional viewpoint, has been'proven for
some time and they have become an
instituted part of the' Suminer session.'

Great difficulties have been experi-
enced by the Appointment committee
of the University ingfinding teachers to
fill the vacaneies for which there are
calls. I
The scarcity of teachers is found' in
all of the branches of high school
teaching. The demand for teachers in
technical and industrial schools is also
great,
An example of the latter arerthe five
excellent positions that are open, but
which have not yet been filled. j

,,R

"A J

CURIOUS M ISH A P"

A TALE OF LOVE TRIUMPHANT, BY CARLO GOLDONI
TWO EVENINGS MONDAY and TUESDAY
mE OSarah Ca swell Angell Hall
RESERVE YOUR TICKETS EARLY AT. WAHR'S 2JOOKSTOItE r-r PRICES 50c and 75c

evil's Disciple" is interesting
mn its stage value in that it'
author's attitude on the Rev-
y war and because it por-
intimate sketch of the unfor-
meral Burgoyne.
OCKWOOD OF DETROIT,
HIGAN GRADUATE,_ DIES

hI ''n

OPEN AIR

CAMPUS SERVICE

Lockwood, graduate of the Law
and of the University, died
ay at his home in Detroit at
of 59. Mr. Lockwood, who was
Detroit's most prominent attor-
as circuit judge for about 10
an in 1909-1910he was presi-
the State Bar association.

SUNDAY 7:30 P. M.

a

SPEAKER: Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas.
ON THE LIBRARY STEPS - IF RAIN, IN LANE HALL

; .

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