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July 27, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-27

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THE WOLVERINE

, Iverine,

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
ON OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
ed Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
s: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
OFFICE HOURS:
12:oo Daily; :30 to 5 :oo Daily, except Saturday.
cations not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signatures,
rily to be published in print, but as an evidence of
nbtices of events will be published in- The .Wolverine'
etion of the Editor, if left or mailed to the office.
communications will receive no consideration. No
will be returned unless the writer encloses postage.
verine does not; necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
he communications.
)N W. SARGENT, Jr.............Managing Editor
P~hone 2414 or 120. f
F. HILLERY....................Business Manager
Phone 960 or 2738.
BUSINESS ASSIS"ANTS
Chapman John J. Hamel, Jr. Robert L. Kersey
ISSUE EDITORS
am H. Riley Hamilton Cochran
COLUMN EDITOR
Howard Weeks
TUESDAY, JULY 27, 1920{
RED, BUT STILL AN INFLUENCE
vith a feeling of regret that the Michigan
and students must take the resignation of
B. Hinsdale, dean of the Homceopathic
school. For 25 years he has been its head,
ng that period he has always worked for
ncement. While it is the smallest of the
ty's eight colleges, it has been an excellent.
it has turned out able men, to serve in this
public welfare. Through a long period
nsdale has been at the head of the Hommo-
:hool, and his resignation will be a great
VMichigan.
tirement seems to be a part of a new move-
the University. He, with other of the older
the faculty, are leaving their work to the,
men. Having served Michigan.well in. the
rs, they are entrusting to others the prob-
developing the University to evei greater
These men, of whom Dr. Hinsdale is one
nost prominent, have achieved success and
ne Michigan much good, but with a new
development, they are letting younger men
ir places.
espite the retirement of Dr. Hinsdale and
the University will not be without their
. The successes which they have achieved
guide their' successors in the right paths.
iot actively engaged in University work,
n will still remain here, their conservative,
ice ever ready to assist the younger men in
situations. Dr. Hinsdale has done great
>r Michigan, for which the students and the
are all grateful, but his influence and great-
loss of which will hurt Michigan to a cer-
nt, will do even more in the years to come.

have a passport. For some reason two of Michi-,
gan's men were not notified of this until the day of
the finals, and it was thus necessary for them to
spend the entire morning before the meet walking
the streets of Boston to arrange for passports.
That one of the men was unable to use his passport,
for which he spent ninedollars, was apparently of
little consequence to the committee. That there are
other similar incidents, many of them perhaps more
aggravating than the ones cited, can hardly be ques-
tioned.
Of course, some people might not consider these
instances of enough moment for criticism; they
might say that these were the only ones, but to us
they seem sufficient, and we also know of a few
other similar cases which we can cite if called upon.
Although our knowledge is necessarily limited
mostly to Michigan affairs, we know of several sim-
ilar ones, and with so many unfortunate things hap-
pening to the Michigan entrants, it seems impossible
that all the other tryouts could have escaped. How-
ever, the 1920 trials for the American Olympic
team are over, and nothing more can be 'done them.
We do cite these, though, in the hope that the uni-
versities, who supply most of the men, and the grad-
uates of universities, who put up a great deal of
the money, will see to it that the mistakes of 1920
are avoided in 1924, and now is the time to com-
nence.
These reports of a huge wheat crop in the Middle
West get us 'll worked up about a probable decrease
in prices, only to have the pleasure spoiled by the
next paragraph saying that it will take two years
to move the crop.
Some of the people who have been visiting the
summer school between trips to Detroit will un-
doubtedly be surprised and aggrieved to know that
one-half of the session is over.

Plans Under Way
For Next Opera
E. Mortimer Shuter; director of the
last two Michigan Union operas, and
who has been engaged for the 1921
production, is spending the summer at.
Altoona, Pa. Several inquiries have
been received by Union officials from
Mr. Shuter, asking for information
conceri(ing the progress of next year's
book.
Although the book has not been defi-
nitely selected yet, several lyrics and
the librettos from the most promising
one have been sent in. Great interest
is being manifested by Mr. Shuter in
next year's opera, which he hopes to
produce on an even larger scale than
the previous ones.
Edwin H. Kreuger, '21E, composer
of the music for r"George Did It," last
year's opera, is at present at work on
several original songs, which will
probably have a prominent place in
next season's opera.
Russel Barnes, '26, will probably
write a large part of the lyrics for
the coming production. At present he
is working on the staff of the Detroit
News.

II SOME

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The Partygee
Mince Piem
Mary Marie
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Further Chronicles of

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FOR TRAVELING ANYW HERE, ANY TIME
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Cox may be liked by the western Progressives, as
Gerard told him, but wouldn't it be surprising if all
these western Progressive turned out to be con-
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Being next to the School of Music has its advan-
tages and disadvantages, butt it is especially charm-
ng in the summer time, when it is necessary to have
the windows o'pen.

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Kindly notice how much longer our Energine Cleaning
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The most widely read and highly appreciated ac-
ceptance of the presidential nomination was un-
doubtedly General Grant's; it was about 200 words
long.
Going up the river does not have the same mean-
ing in Ann Arbor that it does in certain constricted
circles of New York life.
Making a slam on a six bid in a game of five hun-
dred is certainly the height of ill-spent effort.

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MORE FACTS ON THE MATTER
were reproved the other day by a prominent
for our editorial . on the Olympic tryouts,
e of its supposed unsportsmanlike attitude.
;s, indeed, it was unsportsmanlike; it was not
n in that spirit; it was intended merely as a
mat upon the mismanagement of the Olympic
s and as an appeal for the universities to see
ich conditions do not exist in 1924. We still
what we wrote at the time, and 'to support
>inion further, we submit more instances, of
the committee may or may not be proud.
t on the list is its handling of the sectional
s. The opinion was allowed to gain credence
mly the first three men to qualify in their dis-
:ould compete in the finals at Harvard. Be-
this, the Athletic association paid the ex-
of seven men to Chicago, and had them com-
here, only to discover that the, records made
did not qualify or disqualify for the finals
ibridge. Of course, if a man performed well
:ago, it might have been taken into considera-
iut that did not make up any of the money
he Athletic association expended in sending
men there needlessly.
next, perhaps, is not quite so important; but
at have kept the Michigan entries from com-
. Tuesday afternoon, a wire was received in-
ig the Michigan men that tryouts in their
would be conducted Friday. This made it
ary for them to leave Wednesday afternoon
er to get there in time, and only through the
st-luck and hard work was it possible to secure
ations for these three men. Apparently the
ic committee was too busy to let the entrants
of the tryouts except at the last minute.
he matter of handling the passports,. capable
ement was again displayed. It might seem
e people that the committee could have made
'ements with the state department for quick
y of only the necessary passports after the
icement of the team's personnel. But it was
thin the powers of the committee to accom-
his, so that they required each contestant to

Editorial Comment
THE 4 PER CENT DISTURBANCE
According to statistics compiled by the federal
department of labor, 3,374 strikes, involving more
than 4,000,000 workers, occurred in the United
States in 1919. Assuming that the 4,000,000 include
only the strikers and their dependents, and such
other workers as were made idle by reason of their
work being intimately connected with that of the
strikers, the tale is not half told.
Some of these strikes, such as the coal miners'
strike, the dock workers' strike, the railroad strike,
and the steel strike, affected more or less directly'
every inhabitant of the country ; and thus all of the
people, numbering something more than 100,000,-'
000, were put to inconvenience, expense, and some-
times exposed to peril because 4 per cent of the total
was not satisfied with its wages or working condi-
tions and knew ,no other way-or, at any rate, re-
fused to recognize any other way-to better the sit-
uation than to strike.
This is a condition that is a credit neither to our
business management nor our public administration.
It is in effect a sacrifice of the interests of the many
to the interests of the few, when there should be
a sacrificeof neither. There are, of course, always
the unreasonable malcontents who will not be satis-
fied with any arrangement, but for the most part
Americans prefer peace and a steady job to the arti-
ficially created industrial unrest of which they are
so frequently made the victims. It is useless to hope
that all men will be able to agree all the time, but
it is wholly possible for them to adjudicate their
differences without resort to the medieval custom
of using force-and the strike or the lockout is
force. Perhaps when the campaign is over, and
the statesmen and politicians can look forward to
a period of two years without urgent political
maneuverings, they can find time to consider the
question of industrial stability with more sincerity
and earnestness than they have given to it hereto-
fore. Probably nothing would do more to bring
about a return of national contentment and assure.
stable prosperity, and to show that the country is
really as civilized as it pretends to be.-Indianapolis
News.

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