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July 20, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-20

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h'erine

'UDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER
OF TLE UNIVERSITY 0sI MICHIGAN.
Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday Afternoons.
Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street,.
.ones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
OFFICE HOURS:
:oo Daily; 1:30o 0 5:ooDaily, except Saturday.
rns not to exceed 3oo words, if signed, the signatures
to be published in print, but as an evidence of
ces of events will be published in The Wolverine
a of the Editor, if left or mailed 'to the office.
mmunications will receive no consideration. No
be returnedl unless the writer encloses postage.
ne does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
communications.
W. SARGENT, Jr................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or i2o.
EIILLERY....................Business Manager
Phone 960 or 2738.

INESS ASSISTANTS
John J. Hamel, Jr.

Robert L. Kersey

ISSUE EDITORS,
H. Rileyk UHamilton Cochran
COLUMN EDITOR
Howard Weeks;
TUESDAY, JULY 20, 1920.
4YMPC REVISION NEEDED
ent conduct of the Olympic tryouts siows
astic 'revision of the systenri'is needed
is more acutelys f elt her, because of the
t cost Michigan. representatives on the
the fact remains that ther were things
:h resulted in inferior Oren being picked
ically every case where thereWas 'acon-
>osition between the athletic clubs and the
s,, the clubs /ere the ones that received
:ages. It iust be admitted that the ma-
the men on the team were once, or still
its of the univetsities, and yet the athletic
always favored. In picking coaches, men
oked, who had developed the best talent
ntry, for a n 'of an athletit'club, who
a good showing because mainly there have
ge coaches to trai his inen.
re several instances of the power that the
ibs wielded ad of the unfairness of the
s selections. In the quarter mile, Larry
ished sixth, ahead 'of' Driscoll who was
- the squad:. The' reason given, for this
s that Driscoll was boxed, and that his
-ecords showed le could do better, if .it
een for' this unfair positio of his. Of
anyone That knows much about racing, it
rident that a man, who gets boxed,'is an
oner oi- he ould not get boxed In addi-
;, Butler has past records as good as Dris-
yet he was'not picked. What are the tryy-
except to pick the winners ? But the
ommittee seemed to think that it .,was a
past performances. Perhaps some season
Ifs choie ies in that he was a 'member of
1 Atlletic association to which club eight
mpic committee belonged. a.
.nstanc 'was in.thepentathlon rials.
3 'Irving 'of, 0Idaho, tied for fifth inthe
they were not picked because of the pro-~
)unne of Michigan,. and an arnpy man.'
rotests may have had some merit as he
:ood ,performances to his credit, but the
did Ionly mediocre work and had little
his claims. Again the fairness of this
ich omitted Baker and Irving, is seen..
100Iyad dash Michigan's representative'
d for'ane heat, but a man, whom Hart
:, protested against his' running in that
probably because the rival was an athletic
:he protest was allowed. The rival qual-,
te finals in a slow heat; the'Michigan man
d in to the fastest heat of the day and
urth a yard 'behind the winner. Athough
rig among the first six in the trials, the
ob representative, was picked for arelayf
abl because ofhis powerful connectiyns.
re a few of the instancis of the fine and
s which the Olympic commjttee made, and
ndoubtedly many similar cases. The idea
the American team should be to get the
but if the above incidents are As true as
to is, such was not the- entire idea this
n, who did the best in the trials, were not
t seemed to be-a matter of choosing the
had the most influence or protested the
nothing that can be done about the work
r's committee, but iA four years there will
r Olympic. Inasmuch as the universities
most of the men to the team, it is now
he universities to commence a campaign,
result in their getting a square deal and

GOOD FAIIURES
Most of us dislike the word "failure." We say
that it will never be part of our life, that we intend
to be successes,g and that failure will never, enter
into our vocabulary.
But a good failure is much to be desired. We
will never appreciate success until we have known
failure. If we have never known a failure, we have
never known what it is to be spurred on to a greater
effort, <e have' never known what it is to grit our
teeth and determine to win at all costs..
If we have never known failure, we have not
achieved real success. Nothing is more unfortu-'
nate than to succeed too quickly and too easily. If'
our success is reached without struggle or fight,
there is something lacking. We will begin to think
that we are invincible, that we have reached the
heights because of our overwhelming superiority.
And that will be the beginning of our downfall.
Lincoln didn't stop, at his first failue-the fail-
ure to go to school. It made him all the more eager
to learn. One of the Mayo brothers failed in some
of his studies, and his professors toldc him he would
never make a doctor. And the Allies had to suffer
crutshingdefeats to make them fight all the harder
for victory.V
Don't be afraid of failure. The man: who can
withstand, the biggest failures will ultimately gain
the biggest successes: The Michigan Diy.
Editorial Comment
"PAINTED -FACES MUST.GO" $
The Frances Willard Union of Brooklyn, 1,400
strong, has begun war on "the cosmetic evil." In
the words of Mrs. George F. Pashley, state superin-
tendent of the W. C. T. U., "the popularity of paint
and powder has reached the stage where it behooves
all Christian women to put forth their best efforts to
destroy these demoralizing influences. ,
To the pure all things are impure. But assuming
the absolute immorality of a painted face, what is
the relative immorality of dyed hair or manicured
finger nails or darkened eyebrows ? What degree of
demoralizing influence is there in false hair or false
teeth? No doubt there are distinctions and grades
of guilt in all the feminine counterfeiting of nature.
Perhaps the beauty parlor itself ill have to go some
day, as the saloon has gone.
But are not the painted face purists confusing
morals with art ? All that most men see to criticise
in the lavish use of cosmetics by women is the vio-
lence dpne to nature's inimitable gift of beauty.
Viewed as art, it is a cubist performance, an attempt
to paint the'lily and improve the rose of complexions
that are only married by the process. They marvel
why. young girls in particular should barter a divine
birthright for a mess of paint and powder, but re-
gard the problem, not as a moral question, but as
one of the inscrutable mysteries of feminine nature.
--New York World.
COSTS OTHER THAN WAGESF
The object-lesson in the relation between railway
rates and wages must now be nearly complete.
Meanwhile there is growing need of a demonstration
of the similar relation between other costs of public
utilities and their income and solvency. The regu-
lators seem to have the idea that it is only necessary
to order money to be spent, and that it is no concern'
of theirs where themoney is to come 'from. Thus
the Public Service Commission has made an order.
that the Long Island railroad provide 1i, addi-
tional c irs. The reason assigned is that the commis-
sion thinks that the railway's business will increase
artd that the cars will be needed. That is right, and
the company agrees. , What is omitted is the fact
that there already is an order outstandih for new
cars on which; no deliveries have been made, or are
likely sooni to be rmade, considerkng the state of the
irortrade and the railway blockade. Moreover, the
railway's financial condition has ben impaired by
the orders for the increase of wages. If rates are
to be raised to care for the higher.wages, why not

to care for the order to buy equipment?
The same commission directs the New York and
Queens County .railway to improve its service in
rush hourk. It certainly needs improvement. An-
other order is that the Kings County Lighting com-'
pany shall spend $2,500,000 in enlarging its facili-
ties for the performance of its duties under its
franchise as a public utility. ' Doubtless it should
do so. In these and similar cases the public is notj
served as it ought to be, and it is right that pressure
should be put on the holders of franchises to fulfill
the conditions on which they were given. But the,
public utilities are sufferers as well as the public,
and their expectations also have been disappointed.
grievously. When regulators deal with such situ-
ations by an order which does not consider the whole
case, Ithey fail in their duty as protectors of the
utilities by as much as they show excess of zeal in
the service of the public. It is not in the real in-
terest of the public that its utilities should be driven
'into weanekss or bankruptcy. It is good policy to
keep alive the public utilities we have, even by some
relavation of regulation which might be justified by'
counsels of perfection, for it will be difficult to re-
place them.-New York Times.
'Poland Stands as Guardian of All Europe."-
Chicago Tribune head. Which makes us appreciate
what a wonderful thing the Atlantic ocean is
after all.
These earthquakes must have proved a boon to a
lot of Los Angeles people, who were learning to
shimmy.J

EXHIBIT .REMAINS
ONE WEEK LONGER
The Greek government exhibit which
was due to close today, will be open
the remainder of the week, according
to Miss Marie Economidy, representa-
tive of the Greek government, with the
exhibit.
There has been a sustained interest
in the exhibit here, and a large num-
ber of people visited it Sunday. There
will be no more lectures in connection
with the exhibit.
No definite plans as to where the ex-
bibit will be presented next have been.
announced. Detroit and two or three
other cities in the state are under con-
sideration.

$11.60

A GOOD SUPPLY at

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTOR.

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FOR RENT

SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY,
On the Huron River
HALLER & FULLER
JEWELERS
State Street

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ANN ARBOR DAIRY COMPANY
Corner North 4th and Catherine Phone .423
MILK BUTTERMILK CREAM
FOR TRAVELING ANYWHERE, ANY TIME
You Will Enjoy Using the
A.B.A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100, and are
cashed by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identifica-
tion
ASKIUS-

Slide Rules in Leather .Case

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FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101-105 South ,Iain Street X330 South State Street
(Nickels Arcade)

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TRUBEY'S
218 S. MAIN ST.
Confectionery
Lunehes
When downtown stop
In and cool off.

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THE ALLY OF EVERY OTHER SPORT--
FOR KODAK AMATEURS THIS STORE IS G. H. Q.
Cameras, Photographic Helps and Conveniences
that make Picture Making all the Easier,--Film
and Paper
EVERYTHING'S HERL
LYNDON AND. COMPANY
719 NORTH UNIVERSITY

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Typewriters of all makes rent-
ed, sold, bought, exchanged.
TYPEWRITING DONK
HAMILTON BUSINESS COLLEGE
STATE and WILLIAM
CHUBB HOUSE
209 South,;State
OPEN FOR
SUMMER
"TASTES LIKE HOME"
G. S. CHUBB, PROP.
S W AIN
713 E. University Avenue
develops films
And
MAKES PRINTS
with care,
. Vox Lunches at,
Beckor,s
E Delicatesse
a - easet
OpenSiuxsday 4 to 6 P.M.
119 E. Liberty St."
Phone 2620M .
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Big Steamer r
P u t- In -B a y
Capacity 3270 Pan.aengers
Finest exclusive Excursion Steamer, Largest 6
Ball Room, Finzel's Orchestra. No extra
charge for dancing,
Every day from Detroit at 9.00, a. m. for
Put-on-Say -Cnnecting with Cleveland. and
Buffalora tCo..andSteamer 'Arrow for
Middle BassKelley's Island 6r Lakeside.
Sanadusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines, Fare, $1.50
CoerPoiat-15min.byferryfromSanusky,Fareincludingferry, 1.75
Efxurion fares,(returnine sameaday
Put-n-Boy. week day. 90o;Sudys, Holidakys, $1.25 Round trip.
Sandusky. evey day $200 Round trip.
our hours at -day ; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monument,
Pavlion. Groves, Dauncing and i any other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar PointFresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels, Board Walk,
'Thousands bathe here de
Rernn Leave Ssndusy .30 p: m. Putin-Bay 4.30 P. im., Leave Cedar
P'oinCt fmeorrucnect at Saudusky, eveyay arrive Detroit 8.00 p. m.

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TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The An AbO[ Savings. Bank
'Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $600,000.00
Resources, $4,750,000.00
Northwest Corner Main & Iluron
707 North Universiy Avenu.e

Doewroit&45p n .Far~d
at e.
&? Thur. hoc Set, GiSun. 75c.
Wiltsfor amp fod.?
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re's a. reason for doubting a person,
E reporter comes around with bleary
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with the books, the night before. He
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SAUNDERS' CANJOE LIVERY,
On the huron River

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