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July 15, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-15

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 15, 1920. PRICE F

1I. C. A. EX-
EPRESENTA-
[LLEGES
,EGATES
MICHIGAN

rkers of Country
; Carey Puts 'Out
r of Sessions

Ad-

representatives at the
erence, Lake George,
>rt- an unusually suc-
The purposes of the
the different aspects
explained to the many
:f the eastern colleges
Z" workers.
eges- were. represented
ce, the first at which
een represented. Be-
0 delegates were pres-
of the conference was
4, but the first man to
y was Stewart Baxter,
president of the Uni-
Many Things
it was a great meet-
reat many things were
Michigan delegates,
Id employ in conduct-
of the University "Y"
ng the prominent "Y"
e were Aaron Ward,
nan, Dean Brown of
pith, who has just re-
dia after seven years

Six 3obks of War
To Last--Rankin
"The American journalism of the
present can not produce the great lit-
erature of the future," Prof. T. E.
Rankin of the rhetoric department,
said in his, lecture on "The Effect of
Var on Literature." ,
The literature that does come, which
will be here after a period of twenty
or thirty years, will be less emotional
and more intellectual, according to
Professor Rankin. What country or
countries that will produce such a:
literature cannot be determined now,
but the best that was produced during
the war was that of France. This was
caused by the fact that France saw
most of the fighting, the professor con-
tinued. .
The reason assigned by Professor
Raiin that literature would not come
from America was that our present
literature, journalism, is an industry,
while literature is an art. Even the
feature stories of the present are mere
valets dressed in the masters' clothes.
Six books that have come out of the
war would, Professor Rankin thought,
withstand the test of time. These are
Lissauer's "Hymn of Hate," Ibanez's
"The Four Horsemen of the Apol-
calypse," Andreyev's "The Sorrows of
Belgium," Kipling's "The Eyes of
Asia," certain international communi-
cations of Woodrow Wilson, and Cap-
tain Paul Pattee's "LeCran."
PHRBLMS OF MIENTAL
E USDEFTIVESPRESENTED
DR. PERKINS STATES PROVISION
SHOULD BE MADE FOR
UNFORTUNATES,

, - r

>f a
the

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

ed in 0 1
6k an The problems presented by mentally
Flarry defective children that come before
it out the Juvenile court and the methods
f the employed to ,aid these offenders,,were
ssful brought out by Dr. Nellie Perkins, di-
rector of the psycopathic clinic of tie
were Wayne County Juvenile court, in her
gates, address on "Psycopaths Who Appear
n re- Before the Court," Tuesday evening in
ell in the Natural Science auditorium.
gates "Not all offenders who appear before
11 the the court are mentally defective," Dr.
Cor- Perkins said. "Many of them are real
problems unless they are understood,
. D. and a large number among the delin-
Por: quent classes can be aided. Statistics
ewart show that beINeen 30 and 40 per cent
of the children that come before the
Juvenile court are feeble-minded. The
N law however, takes no- cognizance of
their condition if they have committed
JEY crimes. 1
"Psyconeurotics, however, are very
.Con- uncertain and are not able to get along
way without scientific help.; The feeble-
I clay minded children are the most notice-
ld in able and easy to comprehend. Many
aw of of the boys and girls that appear be-
fore the court'present problems that
brook are most difficult to solve, although
, 6-4, many of them are not guilty of serious
it the crimes. If the environment of these
first poor children had been favorable, they
nting would.not commit offenses."
In referring to the mentally defect-
e has ive children, Dr. Perkins said that they
g city are hardest to understand and that
else- they commit petty crimes and aye
ch he truant from school. "It seems,". she
stand said, "that these boys and girls lack
His the appreciation of the issues in-
e be- volved."
e has In conclusion, Dr. Perkins stated
that it is quite apparent that some
special provision be, made for the un-
ESS fortunate psycopathic cases. "The
RTON problem is a practical one and has not
yet been solved," she said.
hat a
FORMER ANDERBILT PHARTHIC

July 15 +
5 p. m.-Geographical Significance of
Niagara Falls. Mr.. F. W. Frostic.
7 p. in.-Educational motion pictures.
8 p. m.-"Irnian Greece," by Professor
Herbert R. Cross.
July 16
2:30 p. m.-Excursion to Niagara Falls,
under the direction of Mr. F. W.
Frostic, via Michigan Central Rail-
road to Detroit and steamer to Buf-
falo.
5 p. m.--The Intermediate School. Mr.
E. 0. Marsh, Superintendent of
Schools, Jackson.
8 p. m. --Reading, "Silas Marner."
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister. (Sarah Cas-
wcll Angell hall.).
July 19
5 p. m.-The Fourth Dimension (illus-
trated). Prof. W. B. Ford.
8 p. nt.-"The High Cost of Living," by
Miss Helen Grimes, of the Depart-
ment of Justice, Washington, D. C.
July 20
5 p. m.-The Wayne County Experi-
ment. Mr. W. B. Arbaugi, Detroit.
8 p. m.-Medical Lecture. Dr. C. G.
Parnall."
2 4 CHOOLS ADO PT}
SHULLSZ OOLOGY
Book Has Bleen Publish4 in Perma-
net Form For Only Two
Months
PROFESSOR HANDLES SUBJECT
IN AN ENTIRELY NEW MANNER
"Principles of !nimal Biology," by
Prof. A. Franklin Shull of zoology
has been received so well by teachers
in this field that within a period of
two months from the time of its first
appearance it has been adopted by 24
of 'the largest colleges and universi-
ties in the country.
According to the author the work
was gotten out in answer to the. de-
aind for a more modern method of
studying zoology. The method em-
ploye* up to this time has been to
take the forms of the various classes
of anithal, and beginning with the
mot simple or lowest form of animal,
the protozoa, take each class separate-
ly, describing its structure, and when
through leaving/t and repeatiAg with
the next class."
had No Connection
In using this method there was no
connection between the different forms
studied. tThis system was used here
up to three years ago, when the course
was reorganized. The first part of the
work to undergo change was that in
the laboratory.
Under the new plan the exercises
were developed around biologic prin-
ciples, that ifinstead of taking some
form of animal life and learning about
its mere structure, an attempt was
made to teach it according to prin-
ciples of physiology, geographical dis-
tribution, paleontology, evolution, and
ecology.'
When the laboratory work was or-
ganized on such a basis it was found
that no textbook could be secured that
might be used in conjunction with the
labpratory work. Two books were
tyied. One was elementary and the
other, besides *having a great many
errors, was not written by a zoologist,
but a physician, who emphasized the
medical points rather than the zoologic
ones. Each was used for one year,
and then Dr. Shull started work on
his new book, developing it along the
lines that were used in reorganizing
the laboratory work.
Appears Only Recently

STATE NURSES
ATTEND IN STITUTE
METIN IN ITY
FANTINE 'PEMBERTON,PRESIDENT,7
OPEN# SESSION WITH
LECTURE
30 PERSONS REPRESENT
SIX MICHIGAN CITIES
Dr. Cabot, Parnall, and 'Others on,
Tuesday's Program; Conference
Lasts Rest of Week
This week the Michigan State
League of Nursing Education is hold-1
ing an institute in the classrooms of
the University hospital. About 30 per-
sons are in attendance, representing
Detroit, Battle Creek, Saginaw, Gray-
ling, Lansing, Jackson, Bay City, and
Ann Arbor.
President Opens Meeting
The opening lecture was given Mon\
day when Miss'Fantine Pembertn, of
this city, president, gave a short talk
outlining the objects of the course..I
Miss Mary Welsh, of the University
hospital, spoke on "The Function of
Instructors." Miss Alice Lake read a
paper on "Teaching Theory - An-
atomy," and Prof. J. J. Edmondson of
the department of education, spoke on
"Educational Aims and Values."
Tuesday Dr. Hugh Cabot, Miss Mary
Welsh, Dr. C. G.4Parnall, director of1
the University hospital, and Prof.'T. J.
Knapp, of Highland Park, spoke.
The program for today and the rest
of the Wveek is as follows:1
Thursday, July 15
"Abnormal Psychology," Dr. A. L.1
Jacoby, University of Michigan. 1
Psychiatry clinic, conducted by Dr.,
Jacoby.
"Teaching Solutions" Miss Alice'
Lake, University hqspital. 1
"Value of the Y. W. C. A. in
Training Schools," Miss Foote, Univer-
,ity of Michigan.I
"Means of Measuring Results," H. A.
Anderson, Detroit.
Friday, July 15
"Social Problems of SyphIllis," Dr.1
Udo Wile, University of Michigan.
Dermatology clinic, conducted by Dr.
Udo Wile.,
"Discussing of Teaching Problems,"
Miss Lake.,1
"Value .of Athletic Association
Training in Training Schools," Miss
Hartshorn, University of Michigan.
"Elimination of Waste." Prof. J. B.
Edmondson.
INIATIONAL LAW
HAS-THREE WEKNESSES
-DICKINSON
CONFUSED : WITH DIPLOMACY
DECLARES PRO-
FESSOR
Confusion with diplomacy, unreal
and impractical rules, and an empha-
sis placed upon the means of limiting
the havoc of warfare rather than upon
the means of bringing about peaceful
settlements of disputes, were declared
by Prof. E. D. Dickinson, of the Law
school, to be the three great weak-
nesses of modern international las, in
his address on "The Outlook for I er-
national Law," yesterday afternoon.

Diseqssing the confusion of inter-
national law with diplomacy, Professor
Dickinson said the recognition of new
states and old states with new gov-
ernments was frequently based on po-
litical expediency instead, of interna-
tional justice. "A new state may have
all the essentials of stable existence,"
he said, "and still not be recognized by
the governments of established states,
thereby depriving its people of the
(Continued on Page 4)

95 Make Niagara
Trip Tomorrow
All persons who have signed up for
the Niagara Falls trip should attend
the lecture this afternoon on the "Geo-
graphical Signifieance of Niagara
Falls," by Mr. F. W. Frostic, who will
be in charge of 'the trip. The cars for
the trip will leave the local interurban
waiting room at 2:05 o'clock. To date
95 people have signed for the trip.
Other lectures this week will include
the four reels of motion pictures on.
educational subjects at 7 o'clock to-
night, two of the reels dealing with
astronomical subjects. One will show
the work of glaciers and one the work
of rivers.. At 8 o'clock Prof. H. R.
Cross will speak on "Ionian Greece,"
one of the series of lectures given in
connection with the Greek governmentf
exhibit.
Tomorrow afternoon Mr. E. 0. Marsh
of Jackson will speak on "The Inter-
mediate School," and tomorrow, even-t
ing in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, Prof.-
R. D. T. Hollis r will give the read-
ing, "Silas Marner." ,
JOHNSON, BUTLER
LEAVE FORBOSTON
Athletes Depart Day Early For Friday
Prehinmiaries; Johnson Said I
to be in Good Shane
BUTLER RUNNING QUARTER ]
BETTEI4 THAN EVER BEFORE
Carl Johnson and Larry Butler,l
Michigan's Olympic candidates, left at
2145 o'clock yesterday afternoon for
Boston, where they will compete in the
finals Friday and Saturday in the Har-
vard stadium. Johnson arrived in the
city Monday night from Spokane,
where he has been training 'for the
last few weeks.
Leave Early
A telegram received Monday caused
the hurried departure of the athletes
a day early. The message stated that
preliminaries in many events would be
run off Friday, and this necessitated
leaving Tuesday, instead of Wednes-i
day, as formerly planned. The men
will arrive in Boston this afternoon.
In the broad jump Johnson has been
working out, and with .good' weather+
he is expected to go over 23 feet 6
inches. From present dope, only one
bhan, Sol Butler, has any chance to
better this record, and in all prob-
ability Carl will take a first in this
event, which will give him a sure
place on the squad.
Butler Going Best
Larry Butler, eptain-elect, has been
going the best that he has ever done
in the quarter mile. In a last time
trial Saturday morning the star 440
man clipped off his distance in :49 flat,
better than which only a few men have
beenable to do this year. As 'he was
running against time, a difficult feat,
there is a chance for him to do even
better, although there may be adverse
weather conditions which will slow
him up. He has had only light work-
outs this week.
Steve Farrell, the Michigan coach,
did not accompany the men. As yet
no official word of thee pentathlon has
been received, the Olympic committee
not yet having picked the men for this
event.
FIVE ENTER FOR TWO SUMMER
UNION BILLIARD TOURNAMENTS

Entries for the summer billiard
tournament of the Union opened Tues-
day evening. Two have entered for
the str .ight rail tournament and three
for the three cushion match. More
entries are expected during the re-
mainder of this week, and*"according
to present plans, the contest will start
early next week. Arrangements for
the tournament are in charge of Rob-
ert R. Snodgrass, '23.

CiNES TO HOL
CONFERENE HER
IEAIQUARTERS OF CONVENTI
TO BE AT MICHIGAN
UNION
200 DELEGATES FROM
MIDDLE WEST EXPECTE
Many Prominent Americans on Pr
gram; Vital Problems of China
to be Discussed in Forum
The Chinese Students' Alliance
the Middle West Section will hold i
annual conference September 1 to
in Ann Arbor. It is expected th
more than 200 delegates will be pre
ent from schools and colleges of ti
middle w st.
The headquarters of the conferern
will be at Michigan Union, and t
meeting will be held there. Male dele
gates- will stay there, while' the girl
of whom there are expected o bea
least 40, will be housed at the omen
Alumnae residence on Washtenaw ae
nue.
Four on Exec utive Staff
The executive staff the conferne
consists of F. C. Llu, 21L, chairmnat
K. H. Wu, '21, secretary; P. C. Kwo
'21, assistant secretary, and T. C. I
'20, treasurer. Dean F. P. Jorda
Prof. E. H. Kraus, Dean J. R. Efflinge
and Mr. J. S. Evans, of the Universil
Y. M. C. A., comprise the adviso
board.
The following prominent America
are expected to give addresses: Ho
P. S. Reinsch, ex-minister. of the Uni
ed States to China; President Markc
L. Burton, of the University of Mich
gan; Dean -John R. Efinger, of tU
College of Literature, Science, and t
arts; Prof. Henry C. Adams, former
advisor to the president of the Repul
lic of China; and Hon. James ]
Couzens, mayor of Detroit. I
Reception Planned
Receptions to the conference will 1
given by the University, the local Ch
nese club, and Ann Arbor churche
In addition to the receptions tgere wI
be socials, public entertainm4nts, i
terclub stunt and singing contests, 1a
delegates' entertainments, and dance
Because of the great crisis faci
China, much attention will be given'
the discussion in open forum of t
solution of vital problems and nation
welfare work. The , committee
,harge of this work has set forth thre
subjects which are especially vital, a
they expect a great deal of discuss
on then. These are: "The Gover
ment and Politics of China," "Indu
tries and Commerce of China," a
"Social Conditions of China."
Prizes will be offeredto thosegivim
the best papers. The oratorical co:
tests and debates will receive speci
attention and prizes will alsob
awarded to those making the best e
deavor in these lines.
(Continued on Page 4
18' SIGN UP FOR
TENNIS TOURNE
Eighteen students have thus far si
nified their intention of entering t
summer tennis tournament, the ent
list for which closes Saturday nig
More are expected to take advanta
of the time extension, andDr. May e
pects that at least thirty names w

be in by Saturday evening. The dray
ings will be held some time Monda
for both. singles and doubles and :
time'will be lost in getting the gam
started.
Those who have entered to date ar
F. Sauchaz, F. Beddow, C. Wells,
Brown, J. Stevens, A. Wood, C. Merk
H. Workman, D. Gilchrist, G. Clippe
E. Custer, R. Burley, V. Rumseyer,
Baton, W. Stoddard.

g he

OF BUSIN]
Y DR BUI
iteristics t
man must

have,E

DEAN VISITS UNIVERSITY

y noon. Dr. E. D. Ruddimn, formerly dean of
:ecutive" the college of pharmacy at Vanderbilt
hich was university, was a visitor at the Univer-
sity Wednesday.

At first the book was gotten out a
few chapters at a time, these being
mimeographed, and this form of text
was used in the year 1918-19. Last
(Continued on Page 4)

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