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July 10, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-10

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I

1ti

Unlurrin

AT YOUR DOC
THREE TIME
A WEEK

I'

0

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1920.

PRICE

i

c.

i11

TATLOCK TO SPEAK
AT UNION SURVICE
The Rev. Henry Tatlock, of the St.
Andrew's Episcopal church, will ' be
speaker at the Union service tomorrow
evening. His subject will be "Chris-
tianity for the Present Day."
The open air service will be held on
the steps of the library and will begin
promptly at 8 o'clock. The Masonic'
band will not play, but several special
violin numbers have been arranged]
for.
Last Sunday evening a large number
attended the service and expressions
of satisfaction with the Union.meeting
idea were heard.
PRO. JOHN GI INTER TO
SPEA ON GREEK ART

)NCERTS
S USUAL

bers Will be Given
'l Bi-llonthly
Concert

WEEK'S_ PRO GRAgM
Dr. Nellie Perkins, of Wayne County
Clinic, to Give Medical
Lecture'
FROSTIC WILL SPEAK ON FALLS
INSTEAD OF PROF. SCOTT;
The first lecture for the coming
week, given Monday afternoon, will be
by Prof. John G. Winter of the depart-
ment of Latin and Greek, which will
be on the Greek government exhibit
now being shown in Alumni Memorial
hall. This lecture will be illustrated. "
Monday evening Mr. S. H. Ranck, of
Grand Rapids, will speak on "The
Work of the American Library Asso-
ciation in France" (illustrated). It
might be interesting to note that Li-
brarian W. W. Bishop, of the Univer-
sity, was head of the association dur-
ing the war, and so a good deal of this
work was carried on under his direc-
tion. Prof. Thomas E. Rankin, of the
Rhetoric departnient, will treat of an-
other phase of war and books when
he will g've his lecture the following
afternoon on "The Effect of War on
Literature."
Medical Lecture Changed
Tuesday evening Dr. Nellie Perkins
of the psycopathic' clinic of Wayne
county, will speak instead of Dr. Bar-1
rett as first announced, her subject
being, "Psycopaths, Who Appear Be-
fore the Court." .

PROF. WATERMAN TO
VERIFY OLD TEXTS
Proa. Leroy Waterman, of the Se-
metic department, is planning to visit
thp British museum at London some-
time during the coming school year for
the purpose. of verifying the texts of
Assyrian Cuneiform tablets.
The results of his work will be pub-
Slished in the '_Michigan Humanistic
Study Series. The work of bringing
forth these series has been fostered
by Prof. F. W. .Kelsey, of the Latin
department, and they contain the work
of many Michigan men and professors.
BA9KER UNDOUBTEDLY
.WINS OLY MPIC BERTH

"SCHOOL TEACHER MUST
STUDIED EXPERIENCE
IN ADVANCE"

GET

"PRESENT EDUCATIONAL
LACKS FOUNI)ATION
FACT"

TEACHING PROFESSION AND NEEDS OF
EDUCATION- DISCUSSED BY DR#f. g LIGI F. I

,erts of an exceptionally at-
e nature will be offered in th'e
il series for the coming winter
any of the leading musicians of
untry will be brought here ac-
g to a statement given out by
a versity School of Music.
opening nuhbr of the series
e given during the latter part of
r by the Metropolitan Opera
te, consisting of the following
ars: Giovanni Marinelli and
Diax, tenors; Nina Morgana and
Rappold, sopranos; Helen Marsh,
Ito; and' Thomas Chambers,
ie. These artists will offer a
laneous , program of excerpts
'uccini and Verdi operas.
Ekissan Pianist to Appear
'el achmaninoff, the Russian
, who has been so well received
o0ut the country during the past
coording to the music officials,
ho is known also by his work
uoso and composer, will -make
ut in November in this-city.
ecember Jan Kubelik, the vio-
who hs not been heard in this
y since his memorable tour
years ago, will be presented to
rbor music lovers.
e orchestral concerts will be
after the holidays, two by the
t Symphony orchestra, under
ton of Ossip GabriloWitsch, in
y and March, and the other in
ry, w4hen the Minneapolis Sym-
orchestra with Emil Oberhoffer
ier, will make its first appear-
. Ann Arbor.
May Festival Iicluded
28th annual May Musical Fes-
:ill take place about the middle
y, as usual. The - University
Union under Dr. A. A. Stanley,
rticipate in two of the evening
mns, while 6ne. of the afternoon
ms will be given ov'er largely to
utions by the Children's Chorus
the direction of George Oscar
who will head the department
lic School Music in the School!
ic this fall.
.o Continue Extra Series
lementary to this series the
also contemplates providing an
series devoted largely to en-
numbers similar to the course
last year, announcement con-
which will be made later.
Iditlun, in accordance with the
of other years, miscellaneous
is-will be provided in Hill audi-
twice a month on Sunday aft-
s. Members of the Music fac-
rTth the assistance of out of
olists, will provide programs of
rariety. These will be. given1
nentary to the general public
ne as the Wednesdlay evening
.s which are being provided
the summer.
3fORE ACTS EOR SUMMER
TLIHT VAUDEVILLE SHOW
excellent acts have been se-
or the Union S'potlight, among
who have responded being sev-
former Spotlight and Opera ex-
e, according to Knight Mirrie-
1, general chairman. There is
tr more acts, and any students
Summer session who possess
of this nature should come out
tryouts.

OF

AM

NEW I

YORK TINES SPEAKS
SIX EN I AHILON

MANY
OF

PERSONS SEE EXHIBIT
MODERN GRECIANS '
YESTERDAY

Prof. John G. Winter, of the depart-
ment of Greek and Latin, will deliver
the first of a series of addresses in
connection with the Greek government
exhibit, now being shown in Alumni
Memorial hall, at 5 o'clock Monday'
afternoon in ithe Natural Science audi-
torium. Professor Winter will discuss
the paintings and other works of art
shown in the exhibit.
Visitors See Exhibit
A large number of visitors were con-
ducted through the exhibit yesterday
afternoon, among them being many
students from the Normal School at
Ypsilanti. Women visitors were par-
ticularly interested in the collection of
costumes worn by Greek women.
Wears Greek Costume
Miss Marie Economidy, the repre-
sentative of the Greek government,
appeared yesterday'In a costume that
formerly belonged to one of the ladies
in waiting to Queen Amelia of Greece.
The costume consisted of a bodice of
blue Copenhagen taffeta, an Faton
jacket of dark blue velvet embroid-
ered with gold thread, and a red fez
with long tassel'of blue and gold.
G ,r

Joe Baker, who tied for fifth place
in the recent pentathlon trials at
Brooklyn, has undoubtedly been chosen
to represent the United States in this
event at the Olympic games in Bel-
gium, although neither he nor the Ath-
letic associatioi have received offidial
notice of the fact.
Refer to hamilton
Late dispatches in the-New York
Times in reference to the decathlon
trials this week, speak of Brutus Ham-
ilton, who will compete in this event
and who won the pentathlon, as being
the leader of the six pentathlon entries.
Baker tied for fifth which would mean
that he is one of the first six, and

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

July 12
5 p. m.-The Greek Government Ex-
hibit (illustrated), Prof. J. G.
Winter.
8 p. m.-The Work of the American
Library Association in France (il-
lustrated). Mr. S. H. Ranck, of
Grand Rapids.
July 13
5 p. m.-The Effect of the War upon
Literature. Prof. T. E. Rankin.
8 p. m.-Medical Lecture Dr. Nellie
^ Perkins.
July 14
5 p. m.-The Outlook for International
Law. Prof. E. D. Dickinson.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music. (Hill Audi-
torium.)
July 15
5 p. m.---Geographical Significance of
Niagara Falls. Mr. F. W. F'ostic.
8 p. m.-Educational Motion Pictures.
July 16
2:30 p. m.-Excursion to Niagara Falls,
under the direction, of Mr. F. W.
Frostic, via Michigan Central Rail-
road to Detroit and steamer to Buf-
falo.
5 p. m.-The Intermediate School. Mr.
F% 0. Marsh, Superintendent of
Schools, Jackson.
8 p. m.-Reading, "Silas Marner."
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister. (Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall.)
July 19
5 p. m.-The Fourth Dimension (illus-
trated). Prof. W. B. Ford.
July 20
5 p. m.-the Wayne County Experi-
ment. Mr. W. B. Arbaugh, Detroit.
8 p. m.-Medical Lecture. Dr. C. G.
Parnall.

Wednesday afternoon Prof., E. D.
Dickinson will speak on "The Outlook
for International Law." The artists
appearing that evening in the faculty
concert at Hill auditorium, are: An-
thony J. Whitmire, violinist; Mrs.
Maude Okkelberg, pianist; and Mr
Geo. . Rhead, accompanist.
The lecture to be given Thursday
afternoon on Niagara Falls has been
changed to "The Geological Signifi-
cance of Niagard Falls," which will be
given by Mr. F. W. Frostic, superin-
tendent of Wyandotte schools, and
acting at present as. instructor in
geography here. He will have charge
of the excursion to Niagara Falls the
next day.
Four reels of educational motion
pictures will be shown Thursday even-
ing. Besides the excursion to Niagara
Falls, there will be on Friday an ad-
dress on the intermediate school in
the afternoon and a reading by Prof.
R. D. T. Hollister on "Silas Marner,"
that evening in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
FORMER CHINESE PREMIER
IS LEADING NEW REVOLUTION
Washington, July 9.-The American
legation at Pekin this afternoon ad-
vised the state department that the
Anfu party, headed by former Premier
and Minister of War Tuan Chi-Jui, had
risen against the Chinese president. A
force under the former premier is re-
ported to be advancing on Pao Ting
Fu, 30 miles south of Pekin.
WOMEN INTERESTED IN PUBLIC
SCHOOLS ASKED TO MEETING
Hope Conklin, acting dean of wom-
en, and Margaret Cameron, secretary
of the appointment committe ask that
all women interested in public schools
meet at 7 o'clock Tuesday evening,
July 13, at Helen Newberry residence.
The purpose of the meeting is to dis-
cuss questions of peculiar .interest to
women engaged in public school work.
PROF. H. C. ANDERSON GIVEN
POSITION ON COMMITTEE
Prof. H. C. Anderson, of the depart-
ment of mechanical engineering, has
been appointed a member of the valu-
ation committee of the American Elec-
tric Railroad association. The com-
mittee lays down rules and sugges-_
tions for valuing the properties of the
association when they must be valued.

consequently a member of the team.
However, to be.' a real competitor,
Baker will have to improve in his later
workouts, for only four United States
men will enter each Olympic event,
although six are being taken across
with the United States team.
Captain-elect Larry Butler has been
working out vigorously for the past
five weeks, both morning and after-
noon, and he will be in the best shape
for the 440-yard dash a week from to-
day at Harvard. Coach Farrel sent
him through a quarter mile this morp-
ing, and Steve clocked him in fast
time, -refusing, however, to divulge the
exact time of seconds.
Jehnsoni Expected Monday,
Carl Johmson is expected in from
Spokane Monday some time, when he
will start workouts for the broad
jump. While no word has been re-
ceived from him since he left the team
in Chicago, he is expected to; be in
fine shape and capable of jump ing 23
feet at least and probably 24, which
would be far enough to give him a
berth on the Olympic squad.
If necessary' Johnson would have
jumped inChicjgo ,as he said he never
felt better in his life. Steve Farrell
stated that Johnson is so tempermen-
tally built that he could go around 23
feet, if he had one foot in the grave.
Few Entries For
Tennis Tourney
Entries for the tennis tournament,
which .is planned for students of the
Summer Session, are not being filed as
rapidly as was expected. A number,
however, have signified their intention
of entering and no trouble is expected
in having enough entries to make it a
success.
Dr. May, who has chrge of the tour-
nament, announced today that all
names, together with the entry fee of
25 cents, \must be handed in before
Wednesday evening. Dr. May may be
found from 2 to 5 o'clock in his office
in Waterman gymnasium any after-
noon. -
PROF. A. S. WHITNEY CONFINED
TO HOME WITH ILLNESS.
Prof. A. S. Whitney, of the depart-
ment of education, is confined to his
home with illness.

EDUCATION CONSIDERED
TRANSIENT PROFESSION
"Few Teachers Have Good Education
Though Time Spent in Training
is Worth While"
"The school teacher must get intel-
ligent experience in order to be pre-
pared for advancement in the profes-
sion of education,"' was the thught
that Mr. Frank E. Spaulding, school
superintendent of Cleveland, empha-
sized in his address on "What Has the
Teaching Profession to Offer," yester-
day afternoon before a large audience
of educators' in the Natural Science
auditorium.
Mr. Spaulding spoke from the stand-
point of those who expect to remain in
the profession. He described the char-
acteristics of education and told what
the school teacher might expect to get
out of it. ,'
Cites Merits
In citing the merits and disadvant-
ages of education, Mr. Spaulding said:
"The current unrest has not been felt
widely is the teaching profession. Now
is the time when everyone who is in
the profession or contemplates going
in, should consider the merits of edu-
cation from their own standpoint.
"Education is not a difficult profes-
sion to get out of. The teacher who
has reached the age of 45 or 50 should
consider seriously whether or not he
should remain or leave the profession.
There are no valid excuses for old
tWechers to remain, for there is aplenty
of excellent material at hand.
Is Transient Occupation
"The fact remains, however, that
education is predominantly a transient
occupation, Almost no one enters the
profession with the idea of making it
a life career. The perce'nt of men is
and has been sialler than the per-
centage of women in education. Teach-
ing has suffered penalties because it
is considered a transient occupation,
principally because the average wage
is higher and the qualifications are
comparatively low as compared to
those of the industrial world.
"Some of these characteristics have
been accentuated in recent years,
especially the initial wage. In order
to obtain sufficient numbers of teach-
ers, it was necessary to increase their
salaries. Another factor that makes
school teaching a transient occupa-
tion, is the shortness of the sch'ool day
and year. Then, too, the employment
is permayzent, unlike many industrial
occupations. There is no lay off in
teaching, and the increasing demand
for teachers tends to lower the stand-
ard of qualification."
Few Have Good Education
Mr. Spaulding declared that only a
small minority of school teachers have
a really good education, and that only
one-half of all teachers even have a
tolerable high school training. He
said that literally thousands of people
in the educational profession have had
no high school education. The oppor-
tunity for important service is unsur-
passed, especially when the profession
is held in such high esteem by the
general public.
."It is impossible to place the re-,
sponsibility for making the profession
transient. This responsibility must be
shared by all those who have anything
to do with education. The prospects
of the profession are actually better
than ever before, and the prospects for
the future are even better. Education
will perhaps be always a transient
profession, as long as it is monopolized
(Continued on Page 4)

"OLD PRINCIPLES MUST
GIVE. WAY TO NEW
"Tools o a Full Education Should I
Given All Cildren, Not dust
to a Few"
"Our long-boasted universal educ
tion is too much fetish, too little fac
too much pretense, too little reality
too much assumption, too litt
achievement." Such was the indPe
ment of our educational system mad
by Dr. F. E. Spaulding, superintende
of the Cleveland public schools, in hI
address on "Making Public Educatio
Equal to Its Task," givefi last nig
in the Natural Science auditorium,
Must See Facts
"As a people, we are just beginnin
,to' recognize the truth, which ha
never hidden itself; and we ar
shocked and alarmed," said D
Spaulding. "We have been taught th
universal education is the very four
dation of our American liberties, i
stituticnV and ideals. We have als
been taught that w4 have universa
education in this country. We are di
covering our mistake, let us hope b
fore it is too late.
"It is high time to take the offensiv
in the struggle for education. W
have bee on the defensive lon
enough-trying merely to retain th
ideals, the standards, the types, ;t
quantity and quality of education th
,prevailed up to three years ago. W
are not succeeding in our defensiv
The old standards are iiot being mair
tained; teachers are -deserting th
piofession in ever increasing numbert
More schools are being closed, term
shortened, or children entrusted to th
ministrations of the. unprepared an
incompetent.
IMust Launch New Program .
"We must change our policy. W
much launch an educational prograi
that will completely swallow up th
old program, which was started nearl
two centuries ago. True; that prc
gram has been improved in detaib
but its fundamental principle and ali
has remained down to the presen
That program set as its gos th
equipment of all the children with th
most elementary tools of knowledg
and a few years' academic instructio
for leadership of a few select mal
youths. But how far we have falle
short of achieving the goal of equi
ping all children with the most e,
mentary knowledge, recent army re
ords revealed in a startling manne:
In this we have failed with twenty-flv
children out of every hundred.
"But that old program, even if it
aims were realized, is grossly inade
quate to meet the educational need
of the present day. We are no longe
a homogeneous people, chiefly of
single race, with a common bacl
ground of fundamental experience
and ideals; for the most part we n
longer live the isolated life of t
early farmer; and as a nation, ou
days of exclusiveness are over. Th
new age, perhaps best marked 0
from the past age by our entry int
the World War, must have an educ
tional prograri adequate to the co
ditions and (problems of the' presen
''Need to Meet Objectives
"The new program must accomplis
all that the old program attempted
but it must also set for itself add
tional and higher goals. Three def
nite objectives must be set: first, t
ess'ential elementary knowledge, trai
ing and discipline; second, civic inte
ligence and responsibility, and thir
occupational-economic intelligence n
efficiency. The program must see
the achievement of every one of thes
objectives with every one of the chi

dren and youth of the land, native
born and immigrant.
"As a whole, the innumerale iso
lated, independent public schools sys
tems of American have not been try
ing to achieve even the first of then
objectives; they have not seriousl
tried to teach all children even to rea
and write. Schools nnen only, a f

i

OPENAIR CAMPUS SERVICE I

D SUBSCRIPTIONS

who have subscribed for
verine but have not paid
ould either mail the dollar
Volverine, Press building,
same at the office, second

N

SUNDAY 7:30 P. M.

I

SPEAKER: Rev. Henry Tatiock
ON THE LIBRARY STEPS

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