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July 06, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-06

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LitILEASUE UCOENANT Of

C'?'

had

134 in
r mark
sagged

Palier
with a lead,
>t. Cox soon
never, but by
McAdoo was
lace, but had
k for him of
th he was at

the Cox people
e. There was a
o see if the New
Id not be swung
n.
went with the
ce was that if the
rse were unavail
.might be thrown
n. This of course
)nvincing, theCox
had struck their

For a moment when Indiana tumbled
in 29 of her 30 and Tom Taggart him-
self cast the ballot it looked as if a
predicted slide to McAdoo had begun.
When, a little later, Washington, which
had..been scattering her votes, cast
them all for McAdoo the McAdoo peo-
ple were sure the movement was on,
but it was too late in the ballot to do
any good.
The Cox people, probably a little
nervous but professing the confidence,
which the outcome justified, sent-word
to their war horses to stand pat and
,refuse to be stampeded. The word was
effective and the blocks which'have
been the Cox standby were unmoved.
The lines held fast.
An attempt at a recess during the
earlier part of the session was drowned
out in shouts of disapproval.
Di-monstration For Palmer
When Palmer on the thirty-fifth bal-
lot hit a higher mark than he had at
any time since the eleventh the Palmer
people set up another demonstration.
There was a nmovement on foot, fora
recess until 8 o'clock after the thirty-
fifth ballot, but the Palmer people
wanted one moretballot before that
and the recess idea was not pressed.
When the convention got back to
order 'and Alabama was called on the
thirty-sixth ballot, Palmer made an-
other gain, taking seven from Ala-
bama. He took them from McAdoo,'
Davis and Cox. It was the vote which
the Palmer people had been promised
and was the reason they did not want
to recess.
Then Palmer picked up four more in
Illinois, taking from both McAdoo and
Cox. Palmer made a gain of one in
VMassachusetts. Montana, which had
been giving McAdoo eight straight'
gave three to Palmer. Then the attor-

MISSOURI SENATOR DENOUNCES
WORK OF DEMOCRATIC
CONVENTION
Kansas City, Mo., July 6.-The
League of Nations was denounced as a
"league of treason and covenant of
national death" by Senator James A.
Reed, who returned here today from
San Francisco, where he was refused
a seat as delegate to the Democratic
national convention.
Reed addressing a mass meeting In
Convention hall here, declared that he
was privately assured by grapevine
message while his case was being
heard, that the credentials committee
of the convention would seat him if he
would agree to keep silent in regard to
the League of Nations on the conven-
tion floor. His refusal to make such
an agreement was responsible for his
being denied a seat, he said.
Not One Man Country
"If there is one lesson that this
country is to learn," said he, in his
speech, "it is that this is not a one.
man country. If you would keep this
republic safe, you must 'do your own
thinking. You, the people, are the
source of all power. The sooner you
exercise it, the better it will be for you
and for the country.'!

JOE BAKER WINS
WAY TO OLYMPICS
(Continued from Page 1)
200-metre run-Hamilton and Brad-
ley tied for first with :23 3-5; Le
Gendre, third with :23 4-5; Baker and
Perrine, :24 4-5, tied for sixth; Per-
rine and Dunne tied for tenth with
:24 4-5.
Throwing the discus-Irving, 123
feet, /2 inch, second; Dunne, 121 feet,
7'/2 inches, third; Baker, 120 feet, 9
inches, fourth; Hamilton, 117 feet, 7Y2
inches, sixth;Bradley, 111 feet, sev-
enth; Le Gendre, 105 feet, 1% Inches,
eighth; Perrine, 99 feet, 1 inch, tenth.
1,500-metre run-Won by Le Gendre,
5:08; Perine,r5:14, second; Bradley,
5:14 4-5, third; Hamilton, 5:15 2-5,
fourth; Baker, 5:15 3-5, fifth, Irving,
5:14 4-5.
Dunne, although disqualified from
the 1,500-metre run because of medi-
ocre records in the four first events,
protested to the officials so vigorously,
that he was permitted to compete in
the final race. Duke showed a clean
pair of heels to all the contestants,
coming into the tape some 60 yards
ahead of. the man who was officially
credited with the first.
If his time is to be counted in this
run, he would be among the men
chosen for the squad. His case is be-
ing presented to the Olympic commit-
tee, which is also selecting the other
Smen. According to early reports,
Baker has made the team, but whether
Dunne's selection on account of his
work in the mile, would eliminate
Baker is not known. It is probable
that seven of the men would be taken,
due to the tie for fifth place.

5
8

July 7
p. m.-What the Jew Has Done for
America. Prof. William Rosenau, of
Johns Hopkins university.
p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music. (Hill Audi-
torium.)

WHAT'S GOING ON
I I
July 6
5 p. m.--What America Has Done for
the Jew. Prof. William Rosenau, of
Johns Hopkins university.
8 p. m.-Medical Lecture. Dr. Hugh
Cabot.

F:

5

8
5

July 8
p. m.-Americanism and Judaism,-
Their Common Hopes and Ideals.
Prof. William Rosenau, of Johns
Hopkins university.
p. m.--Educational Motion Pictures.
July 9
p. m. and 8 p. m.-Some Present-Day
Educational Problems (two lec-
tures). Mr. F. E. Spaulding, Super-
intendent of Schools, Cleveland.

i

I :

was drawing
rwere pros-
the desperate
ng for some
ek.
reversed the
in the ballot-

Reed denounced the Democratic con-
vention at San Francisco as "a con-
vention afflicted with internal blind
staggers."
Without direct personal reference to
anyone, he declared there was little
difference between the doctrine of the
divine right of kings and the modern
doctrine that a man elected to office
becomes thereby a leader, and that all
who differ with him are excommuni-
cated and outcast."

i
a
1
I

U

NCH

ney general picked up four more in
South Dakota and one in Virginja. He
lost, however, one and one-half in
Washington; In return, he picked up
three in Wisconsin. Then after the
thirty-sixth ballot and on motion of
Fred B. Lynch, of Minnesota, the con-
vention recessed.
MISS STARR TO LEAD SONGS
FOR NEWBERRY RESIDENCE
Miss Clara Ellen Starr, head of the
department of music in the Northwest-
ern High school of Detroit, will con-
duct the singing at dinner at Helen
Newberry Residence this summer.
Miss Starr has been associated with
the Northwestern High school in mu-
sical work for the past four years, and
has for more than two years been the
head of that department. She is at
present taking academic work in the?
Summer session of the University.

1L11 PM,
LADIES
INVITED
INtl
y Avenue

Has Praise for Lansing
Robert Lansing, ex-secretary of
state, he described, as the only man
whom the president took to France
with him who knew anything about
international law "and about the only
one who had ordinary common sense,'
and asserted Lansing's removal from
office was the result of "his insistence
upon warning the people of the true
mea'ning of this league with treason,
this covenant of national death."
He declared that "this information
in regard to what the league means is
going to the people and they shall
know the truth."
Reed was received with enthusiasm
and a resolution passed by a rising
vote, denouncing the act of the Demo-
cratic national convention "in denying
their representation to this community
in refusing to seat Senator Reed," and
indorsing the senator's stand, was tel-
egraphed )to the Democratic conven-
tion.
Reed said the Democratic conven-
tion on Independenc'e Day, 1920, "is
sittingnot to determine if it will never
surrender any American rights, but
that it will surrender all the American
rights it can."
Wolverine Classified Ads -bring re-
sults. Ads should be brought in by 2
o'clock before day to be run.
Subscriptions to The Wolverine, per
summer session, $1.00.

CONCERT AND LECTURES THIS
WEEK OVERSHADOW OTHERS
(Continued fronm'Page 1)
The Dance of the Gnomes .......Raff
Mrs. Rhead
Yesterday and Today .........Spross
The Brownies ......... ....Leon!
Horning.................Del Riego
The Morning Wind........Branscombe
Miss Hunt
Mrs. Rhead and Earl V. Moore,
Accompanists.
Motion Pictures Thursday
Three reels of motion pictures will
be shown Thursday evening, the pic-
tures being of a historical nature, the
subjects being "French Exploration in
North America," "English Settlements
in North America," and "The West-
ward Movement." Thesepictures are
furnished by the Society of Visual
Education of which Dean R. D. Salis-
bury of Chicago university, is chair-
man, and Dean V. C. Vaughn of the
Medical school, is a member of -the
board of directors. The showing here
will be the first time that these films
have appeared in this district.
Dr. F. E. Spaulding, superintendent
of the Cleveland schools, will give
both lectures Friday, the subject of the
afternoon lecture being "What~ the
Teaching Profession Has to Oer," and
that of the evening address being,
"Making Public Education Equal to Its
Task." Dr. Spaulding has recently
been made dean of the graduate de-
partment of education of Yale'univer-
sity and will take up his new duties
there in the fall.
Wolverine Classified Ads bring re-
suits. Ads should be brought in by 2
o'clock before day to be run.

Dorizas Visits
"Mike" Dorizas, of the University of
Pennsylvania, who holds the intercol-
legiate weight lifting record, visited
Thomas S. Evans at Lane hall Mon-
day. Evans met Dorizas, when he was
at Pennsylvania as "Y" secretary.
While at the university, he won his
"P" in three different sports, football,
track, and wrestling. He was a rep-
resentative of the United States at the
Olympic games of 1908 and 1912, and
for three years Dorizas was champion
of wrestling at Penn, taking 4 minutes,
20 seconds to-throw his three men.
John Maulbetsch, Michigan All-Am-
erican football man, said that Dorizas
was hthe only man on the 1915 Penn
team who could stop him.
STRIKE IN ANCONA ENDED;
QUIET IS AGAIN RESTORED
Ancona, Italy, July 6.-The general
strike which has been in progress
since June 26 has been called off and
conditions in Ancona, which have been
more orless disturbed since the recent
troop mutiny, are now normal.

MIKE KNODE

Kenneth Knode, '20H, playing his
initial full game for the St. Louis Car-
dinals yesterday morning, knocked out
his first hit, a single, out of four times
at bat. In addition Mike was credited
with a sacrifice, hit, and he 'made two
putouts in- left field, which he played
for the whole game.
Knode had thge honor of leading off
for St. Louis. The hit, which he made,
came with a man on base, who tried
to score but was caught at the plate.
Before this game Mike has gone in as
a runner and a pinch hitter, scoring
once, walking, and going out.

If

OKLAHOMA REPRESENTATIVE
DIES OF LOBAR PNEUMONIA

x

FOR RENT

iV

fl&

Washington, July 6.-Representative
Dick I. Morgan, of Oklahoma, died of.
lobar pneumonia at Danville, Ill., last
night. He had represented the eighth
Oklahoma district in congress for the
last twelve years. His home was at
Woodward, Okla.
TREATY SIGNED, RETURNING
SCHLESWIG TO DANISH RULE
Paris, July 6.-The treaty returning
the Danish zone in Schleswig to Dan-
ish sovereignty was signed here yes-
terday morning by the French, British,
Italian and Japanese ambassadors, and'
H. A. Bernhoft, Danish minister to
France.
Subscriptions to The Wolverine, per
summer session, $1.00.

TS III

a

FOR RENT,.
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY

SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY
On the Huron River
READY TO SERVE
From 11 a. m. to 1 p. m. an
5 to 7 p.m.
Pot of Hot Tea and Bowl of Ric
PLAIN CHOP SUEY 3
CHINESE and AMER. STYLE.
fSHOFT ORD,,S
QVANO TVNG (
413 East Liberty
CHUBB HOUSE
209 South State
-t OPEN FOR
SUMMER
SCHOOL
"TASTES LIKE HOME'
G. S. CHUBB, PROP.

On the Huron River

ARBOR DAIRY COMPANY
urth 4th and Catherine Phone 423
BUTTERMILK CREAM
I TRAVELING ANYWHERE, ANY TIME'
You Will Enjoy Using the
Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
enominations of $10, $20, $50, and $100, and are
Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identifica-
ASK US
VERS AND MECHANICS BAN K,
ith 3Main Street 330 Soutli State Sreet
(Nickels Arcade)
;GINE ODORLESS CLEANING
notice how much longer our Energne Cleaning
s clean over any other cleaning you have had.

_._,.. I

I

a

Open
Untill
Aug. 15

FOR RENT
SAUNDERS' CANOE LIVERY
On the Huron River

AMERICAN CIGAR STORE
BILLIARDS AND POCKET BILLIARDS
Cigars, Cigarettes, Tobaccos, Candies. Soft Drinks, Ice Cream
514 E. WILLIAMS ONE BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

I

THE

Spedding Studio

Cool

Y

Inn

619P Last Liberty St.
Our Photographs Must Please You

Lane Hall

z
U

Company.
REPAIRING

b:i
tw

I

BLUE FRONT CIGAR STORE
UNDER STUDENT MANAGEMENT
Corner State and Packard Sis.
ANN ARBOR HAT CLEANING CO.
625 EAST LIBERTY STREET
ALL KINDS OF HATS CLEANED-LIKE NEW
SHOES SHINEID-1e

FOR MEN ANDWOMEN

RATES
LUNCH and DINNER per week
LUNCH - -
DINNER -

-

I

WE SERVE
,.0

LNN ARBOR-PHONE 2508

Good Food,

IVT

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