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July 03, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-03

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VITH

I

e/o

En u rz

THREE TIN
A WEEK

AT YOUI

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY , 1920 PRICE FIVE

T . k _.. ...-----_.__.

NIGHTS
IEF SPEECHES
FOR THE
RATA.
'O ADDRESS
V'S MEETING
11 Talk at Subse-
ngs; Masonic
Play

CONVENTION PLANS
RAPIDLY MATURING
Plans for the National Educational
conference, which will be held here
Oct. 14 and 15, are rapidly maturing,'
according to a statement made y'ester-
day by President Marion L. Burton.
This convention, which will have in
attendance many of the -greatest edu-
cators of the country, will have as its
purpose the discussion of and the at-
tempts to find means to solve the many'
important problems and changes that1
are arising at the present time in
America, according to the President.
The formal inauguration of Presi-
dent Burtoh will also take place at the
-time of this convention, and Dean John'
R. Effinger, of the literary college, as
chdirman, is working with a committee
at the present time on the program for
the inaugural day.
CAMPUS BUILDI.NG
SHOWS PROGRESS
Remodelig of President's Home Nears
Completion; Ready For Occu-
pancy in Month
DELAY OF MATERIALS SLOWS
BARBOUR DORMITORY WORK

MOADOD0 LEADING
31 DEMOCRATS
ON FIRST BALLOT

11AS

266 VOTES;
WITH 254;
ONLY

PALMER NEXT
COX HAS
134_

BRYAN FLATLY TURNED,
DOWN BY CONVENTION

dlegates in Quick Work Reject
Efforis to Amend Reported
'Platforms I

All

for Ur

'cii ser-
11 be at
ront of
by the
of the

Auditorium, San Francisco, July 3.--
The result of the first ballot to choose,
a Democratic presidential nominee fol-
lows:
Palmer......... . 254

en

i brief addresses will be on
. In case the Weather does
the open air services, they
lucted in Lane hall.
tev. Wells First
meeting tomorrow night
Iressed by t-he Rev. John'
s, of the Baptist church, his
e "Service." The Masonic
the direction of Wilfred
the School of Music, will
. program of varied num-
ged by R. A. Mershon, has
Lied.
mbers Urged Out
and members of all the
ve been urged by the asso-
lals to attend. The follow-
s will speak at the services'
r mentioned: Rev. Henry
v. Leonard A. Barrett, Rev.
Stalker, Rev. Lloyd C.
ev, Sidney S. Robins,, and

McAdoo ....................
Cox ...................
Meredith .... ..........
Owen. .. ......... .
Davis....................
Cummings.............
Marshall .............
-Edwards .. ..........
Smith.......... ......
Colby.................
Glass ...............
Champ Clark...........
Chandler :VI. Wood '... ....
Hearst ...................
Gerard................
Hitchcock..............
John S. Williams........
Bryan.................
Sen. Simmons...........
Harrison . . ....... .,..
Secretary Daniels.......

266
134
26
33
32
25
35
42
109
1
26%/
9
4
1
13
16
20
V'
24
61
1

PRESIDENT GREETS
MANY AT RECEPTION
A great many students, members of1
the faculty and townspeople, availed
themselves of the opportunity of meet-
ing'nd shaking hands with Michigan's
ntew president, Dr. Marion L. Burton,
and his wife, at the reception given
by them for the students of the Sum-
mer session yesterday afternoon at
4: 15-o'clock in Alumni Memorial hall.
The reception, which the president
of the University gives annually, was
pronounced by the deans as being by
far the largest ever held. The last
person did not finish the round of
shaking hands until 6:15, a full halt
hour afer the reception generally
closes.
Those in the receiving line were
President and Mrs. Marion L. Burton,
Dean John R. Effinger of the Literary
college, Regent and Mrs. Junius Beal,
Dean E. H. Kraus of the Summer ses-i
sion and wife, Secretary Thomas E..
Rankin! of the Summer session and
wife, Dean A. H. Lloyd of the Grad-
uate school and wife, and Dean Mor-
timer g. Cooley of the Engineering col-
lege.
President Burton' had something to
say to almost everyone whom he met,
and showed a surprising freshness at
the end of the reception. Refreshments
were served to all attending.
IVI.b
SPOTLIGH'T .HEADf
Summer Vaude'ville Production Will be
Conducted by Union Later
In Month
CALL FOR TRYOUTS IS TO BE
ISSUED EARLY NEXT WEEK
Knight Mirrielees, '20E, has been
chosen chairman of the committee to
arrange for the summer Spotlight
which is to be given by the Michigan
Union the latter part of this month.
Announcement' of the other members
of the committee will be made Tues-

i
i
I

a

TRYOUTS WANTED FOR
THE WOLVERINE STAFF
Tryouts for the editorial side of
The Wolverine are wanted. Any
one desiring to do any work of this
kind should consult with the man-
aging editor from 1 -to 2 o'clock
any day of the week, at the pub-
lication offices in the Press build-
ing.
The business ~ manager desires
tryouts for the, business staff of
The Wolverine, and he will be able
to see applicants all Monday after-
noon and from 1 to 2 o'clock other
week days.

REEVES'

SCHOOLS MUST DEMAND ACCURACY,
DECLARES PRESIDENT M. L. BURTON
IN HIS FIRST' OFFICAL ADDRE!

TREATY TALK

'It

WILL BEt SCIENTIFIC

TO SPEAK
OF

FROM VIE WPOINT
SPECIALIZED
yTUDENT

CLOSES
MEETING.

H1UR
ATER

OREENE
CO-

the Society for the Pro-
gineering Education, in
since Tuesday, went to
y morning for the final
program, an inspection
rial plants of special in-
n.
ea was made for greater
etween the preparatory
e college of engineering
he college of engineering
tries, of the country by
hur Greene in his ad-
annual dinner of the so-
rsday night in the Union.
n between the schools
s to be obtained by more
thorough work in the
ubjects of, mathematics,
the sciences taught in
id an acceptance of this
tolleges, so that the aver-
ol can send its graduates
without conditions," said
ene.
he said:
r may mean to some a
t of curricula, and this
e so that graduates from
ent of the high school
the engineering college.
college and industry co-
1 consist in more thor-
nse training by the col-
i subjects, the industries'
special training required
uliar problems '
ratory school, the college
or commerce should real-
tions, the scope and the
of the activities of each
oad way and aid in ac-j
for their own guidance."I

Substantial progress is being made
on all construction work under the
supervision o}the ' buildings and
grounds committee of the University,
including remodeling of the president's
home on the campus, improvements in
the second floor of the main wing of
University hall, the erection of the,
Betsy Barbour dormitory and - the
nurses' home, and new equipment at
the University power plant, according
to E. C. Pardon, chairman of the com-
mittee.'s
Remodeling Progresses
Work of remodeling the president's
residence on the campus is to be com-
pleted the latter part of this month,
according to -present plans, and the
building will be ready for occupancy
by President Burton and family the
first of August.
A sun parlor, dining porch, sleeping
porch and garage with maids' rooms
above, have been built. The old por-
tton of the structure has been replas-
tered throughout, a new roof put on,
and new floors laid. In order to make
the basement of sufficient depth, the
basement floor was lowered about a
foot.
Six new class rooms will be provid-
Qd on the second floor of the main
wing of University hall by improve-
ments which are just being started.
The rearrangement ,will reduce the
size of the auditorium in the hall, but
it is planned to have a seating ca-
pacity for not less than 800 in the
auditorium when the work is finished.
More Room Needed
Need of additional class rooms in
the building has become constantly
more pressing with the fast increasing
enrollment of the University. The
work will be completed in time for the
rooms to be available for use at the
opening of the fall session.
Delay in shipment of materials for
the Betsy Barbour dormitory retarded
construction for nearly two months,
but the work is being pushed rapidly
now. The heating plant has been in-
stalled, and most of the plumbing is
finished. The dormitory will be open
by early fall.
The frame work of the new nurses'
home -under construction near the
University hospital, is now being put
up. The home is to be completed in
September.
Installation of the new 600 kilowatt
turbine for the University power plant
has been started. A system to soften
the water used in the boilers at the
plant is to be put in soon, in order to
eliminate the difficulties that have
arisen in past winters on account of
the use of hard water in the boilers.

Michigan cast 15 ballots fpr McAdoo,'
Palmer 12, Bryan 1, Marshall 1.
Auditorium, San Francisco, July 3.-'
In quick and successive votes the
Democratic national convention yes-
terday voted down by heavy majorities
all attempts to amend the report of
the platform committee and threw out
all substitute proposals, including the
bone-dry plank by William J. Bryan
and the-wet plank offered- by W.
Bourke Cochran.
SustaIn Plank
The administration's League of Na-
tions plank as reported by the commit-
tee was sustained against all attack.
The administration supporters were in
control by heavy majorities all along
the line.
The vote on the Bryan plank was
929% no; 155% yes; 8 ab ent or not
voting. The official total which beat
the Cockran moist plank was 7261/
against it and 356 for it. Eleven and
a half votes were absent.
Without a roll call the convention
also voted down Bryan's plank for the
publication of an official newspaper by,
the federal government. The Bryan
profiteering plank also was rejected by
acclamation.
In quick succession the convention.
then voted down also the plank offered
by Bryan declaring against compulsory
military training In peace time.

day.

,f

A call will be issued next week for
students who have any ability in sing-
ing, dancing, impersonation, or vaude-
ville acts of any kind to try out for
the Spotlight. A special effort will be
made to secure- the participation of
students who are here for the summer
only.
_Naterial Furnished
In former years this class has fur-
nished much valuable material, but the
committee is handicapped by being un-
familiar with the abilities of the new-
comers.
The summer Spotlight, which is sim-
ilar to those given during the school
year, is intended primarily for stu-
dents who are here only In the sum-
mer, and in a large measure the suc-
cess of-the event depends on their par-
ticipation, and support.
Moore to be Director
Earle Moore, director of the Union
orchestra, will. be in charge of the
orchestra program, and an attempt
will be made to have as many as pos-'
sible of the regular orchestra mem-
bers here for the Spotlight.
Kemp Keena, soloist in two of the
Union operas, will take part in the
Spotlight, as will several other stu-
dents of former Spotlight experience
who form a nucleus for the coming
event.
EXTRA COPIES FOR SALE
Extra copies of this issue of
The 'Wolverine, which contain
the principal parts of President
Burton's. first official address,
will be printed and placed on
sale at the publication offices in
the Press building'for five cents.!
I I

In his lecture, the "Treaty of
Peace," which will be delivered at 5
o'clock Monday afternoon, Prof. . S.
Reeves, who is the head of the political
science department and an authority
on affairs of this nature, will deal with
the matter in a scientific manner.
An entirely non-partisan standpoint
will be taken, and he will endeavor to
show the reasons for the treaty, what
the statesmen considered necessary at
the time, how they worked on it, and
in what measure they achieved suc-
cess.- This will not be a political' talk.
Takes Judicial View
Professor Reeves is expected to take
a judicial point of view in his discus-
sion, which will be given in the spirit
of an expert student of the matter.
Althowgh the treaty is now quite old,
this will be practically the first, ad-
dress along these lines given in the
University.
This lecture is in the nature of a
special Fourth of July talk.'Although
classes are always dismissed for In-
dependence day celebration,- Dean E.
H. Kraus, of the Summer Session, has
always arranged for a lecture of this
type on that, day.
Berkowitz to Talk
Three talks on the Jewy and the
American will be delivered by Dr.
Henry Berkowitz on Tuesday, Wed-
nesday, and thursday. These talks,
which are in the nature of an explana-
tion of the Jews, are scheduled annu-
ally by the Summer Session for the
lecture program.
On Tuesday evening Dr. Hugh Cabot
will give a special medical'lecture.
SECOND ENTERTAINMENT OF
MUSIC FACULTY WEDNESDAY

DEALS MAINLY WITH FUNDA
MENTAL EDUCATIONAL
PRINCIPLES
LAR GE AUDIENCE HEARS
NEW EXECUTIVE SPEAK
America Always Believed in School
He States; War Deepened This
Confidence .
"Our schools, as never before, mus
demand accuracy, must awaken the
students, modernize their student
and finally make the schools, then
selves, the centers of training in in
tekrity," declared President Mario
Leroy Burton Thursday night in h
address in Hill auditorium on "Wha
the Schools Must Do." President Bu:
ton's address dealt principally upe
those fundamental principles that i:
back of education. from the kinder
garten to the college and university.
"The traditional answers to t-
question of what the schools must d
are not sufficient," he said. "We mus
admit that a new day creates ne
tepndencies and new demands. Ou
public school system, however, has e:
pressed such large elements of trul
in the past that there need be no un
due concern about its . overthrow o
complete metamorphosis now.
Ventures New-Opinions
"It will continue to function mighti
in this new day. Our task, then, is n
to say something new, but tp ventu:
certain observations upon the ne
emphasis which must be placed upo
the actual work of our education
system.
"America has always believed in e
ucation. The war has deepened ou
confidence in all forms of training. TJ
people seem to understand clearly th
democracy and education are inse
arable.
"This developing cenfidence in ed
cation is paralleled by a growing co
cern for the met ods and aims of ou
educational institutions. The enti
system, from top to bottom, is und
careful scrutiny. Numerous proposa
are being put forward looking to t
reorganization and reconstruction
our educational system.
(Continued on Page 5)
PRACTICAL JOKER MISCUES;
NO WOLVERJNE EXTRA ISSU

s
'1

Same Fate for League Plank
The Bryan League of Nations plank
shared the same fate, going out in a
great chorus- of "Noes."
A plank for a commission' to investi-
gate the feasibility of a soldier bonus
also was rejected without a roll call.
The substitute Irish plank declaring,
it is the purpose of the nation to rec-
ognize the independence of the Irish
republic also was voted down by the
convention by a vote of 402% for to
676 against.
Bryan, with one of his old-time
speeches in support of a bone-dry
plank for the Democratic platform,
turned -the convention almost upside
down late yesterday afternoon with
the magnetism and force of his ora-
tory, and started one of ,the greatest
and noisiest demonstrations the assem-
bly had yet seen.

Some practical joker informed the
Aan Arbor public yesterday -that Pres-
ident Wilson was dead, and in the
course of the day*the story traveled
over the entire city. Someone phoned
The Wolverine, representing himself
to be the Associated Press, and gave
the story to a man in the office.
However, the would-be joker was
apparently ignorant of the fact that
The Wolverine carries no Associated
Press reptrts, consequently being in
no position to receive such a message,,
and that if the story did come it would
be throug ha long-distance call from
Detroit, where the Associated Press is,
and not through a local call.
Unfortunately for hisjoke, The Wol-
verine did not ruch out an extra nor
call up the citizens promiscuously.
One or two inquirers were informed
that a report, which could not'be con-
firmed anywhere, had come over the
telephone.

The second concert in the series of
musical entertainments given by the
faculty of the University School of
Music in Hill auditorium in co-opera-
tion with the entertainments being
provided by the University for the
benefit of Summer school students and
citizens will take place at 8 o'clock
on Wednesday evening.
The following will participate: Miss
Nora Crane Hunt, contralto, acting
head of the vocal department, who will
offer two groups, consisting of Luzzi's
"Ave Maria" with organ accompani-
ment by Mr. Earl V. Moore, and a
group of songs sung with piano ac-
companiment by Mrs. George B.i
.Rhead; and Mrs. Rhead will offer two.
groups of piano numbers.

r
,

Student Volunteers to Meet This
Evening
The Student Volunteers will me
at 7:30 o'clock this evening in Lai
hall. The regular meetings, whi<
were discontinued between the regul
session and the Summer session, w
again be started, and will contin
for the remainder of the summer.

EN AIR CAMPUS SERVICE

Sunday 8. P. M.

m

Patriotic Singing:

-

Brief Address -Rev. J. M. Wells

mU

ERSITY HALL AND THE MUSEUM

+ -

IF RAIN, IN LANE H

*

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