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July 01, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-07-01

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AT YOUR
THREE T

1.,

A WE]

-di

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 1, 1920

PRICE

VC BRINGS LOCAL
SUIT ENT GREENE TAL TRKS

Industry And Intelligence,
Points For Success, Says

I'

---- -

LY!

TRYOUTS WANTED FOR
TTHE WOLVIRTNE STAFF

TMENT
WHITE

ays; Faig
nical

Tryouts for the editorial side of
The Wolverine are wanted. Any
one desiring to do any work of this
kind should consult with the man-
aging editor from 1 to 2 o'clock
any day of the week, at the pub-
lication offices in the Press build-
ing. .
The business manager desires
tryouts for the business staff of
The Wolverine, and he will be able
to see applicants all Monday after-
noon and from 1 to 2 o'clock other
week days.

,
t
i
s

There are two forces which make.
each individual what he is, Dean V. C.
Vaughan of the Medical school stated
in his lecture, "Heredity and Environ-
ment," Tuesday evening in the Nat-
ural Science auditorium, these being
those traits of character and potential
'influences that come at birth, which
are obtained from the parents, or.
what is known as heredity; and sec-
ondly, all those influences that play
on character after birth, or environ-
ment.
Dean Vaug)han strongly refuted the1
idea that pe'ple are influenced by any
action or outside force after concep-
tion and before birth.
Mendel Experiments
The first experiments with heredity

and to the absolut
opposite characteri
The latter, howev
appears in the ne
stated.
It was also found
ed crossing of thi
characteristics thes
will always appear
istic is known as the
the one which is t
the recessive one.

emporarily lost in

Two i iG||
VaughanMRN LURDYUUT
e exclusion of the
per, is not lost, but
ext generation, heUT HINS ETI
that in the repeat-
ngs having unlike PRESIENT-EMERITU S FIN ALLY
same characteristic UETS CHANCE TO REST, AFTER
This character- YEARS OF WORK
e dominant one and

Strong Cha'acteristics Dominant
Always the strong charactristic is
the dominant, such ones as sanity be-
ing dominant over insanity, and strong
character being dominant over weak
character, and no matter what one's
appearances may be, one passes to hisI
offspring his traits just as they are.
Dean Vaughan declared that envi-

WILL PROBABLY TAKE
TRIP ABOUT AUGUST 1
Former Executive Plans to Remain
in Ann Arbor for the
Present

DAY, YH IlgDR H,
:sTO "PIVATE"III
FORMAL INAUGURAL SERV I
TO BE HELD THIS
FALL
NEW EXECUTIVE SPEAK
IN HILL AUDITORIL

Address This Evening Will
First Appearance
U. of M. Head

be Burton
ii s

-Coo/ty, of th
ng collegg, wa
president of th
Taylor, of Texa
S. H. Evans,
rere chosen vic
F. S Bishop, o
and W.O. Wile:
'ere ,again mad(
esident respect
meeting will N
mer at 7 o'cloc
nion and the ad
s: Co-operation
Schools, College
Viewed from th
ucator," by Ar
president of th
ion ofEngineer
etsions in Ann
s twenty-eighth
)me to a close.
ety are to leave

he
le
is

ii
.
i

.

1

- rating system introduced last fall. This
e system corresponds with that employ-
ed during the war by the army for the
k rating of officers. A discussion on the
n report of intelligence tests was given
n by Prof. H. H. Higbie, of the engineer-
e ing department.
e In the third session on Wednesday
afternoon Prof. E. F. Coddington, of
e Ohio State university, treated on his
experiments in the teaching' of calcu-
n lus. His theory was to demonstrate,
h the subject by illustrating it with sim-
ple problems with which the average
e student is already familiar. He ob-
tained results by co-operating with the
° professor of physics in teaching the
' two courses. Several\ committee re-
t ports were made at this session.
P The delegates were taken by auto at
noon.to Geddes, where luncheon for
250 guests was served on the lawn of
the yivian House. The house was
opened to the society by the Detroit
t Edison Co.

DeanVaugan dclard tht uvi-
were made by Mendel, an Austrian ronment is a strong factor in life and
monk, who worked unknawn during that it takes an exceptionally strong
hi lifetime, but whose conclusions person to live for any length of time
made public since his death have had above his environment.
an important place in the field of At the end of his leciure Dean
heredity and .eugenics. Mendel found Vaughan stated that the . cardinal
that crossing things with opposite points for success in life are industr,
characteristics does not result in a the result of environment, and intel i-
blending of the characteristics, but gence, the result of heredity. He also
rather in the appearance of one of stated that the strongest influence on
these characteristics in its full degree a student is his fellow students.

i

Ex-President Harry Burns Hutchins,
who retired today as chief executive
of the University, declined to make any
further farewell statement. His speech
to the alumni and his baccalaureate
address to the seniors were sufficient
as farewells to the students and alum-
ni, he declared.
As yet no definite plans have been
formulated by President and Mrs.
Hutchins for the coming months. It
is probable that they will start on a
trip about August 1, but before that
date the retired president will remain
in the city, resting and assis. ing Pres-
ident Burton in his new work.
To Learn to Drive Car
Some moutls ago Dr. dutcliins said
that one of his occupations after re-
tiring would be learning to drive his
automobile, and it is probable that he
will devote much of his time to this.
Many bunches and pots of flowers
from friends -were received yesterday

CAMP DAVIS WORK KRAEMER RESIGNS
WELL UNDERWAY~. AS PHRMIC DEA N

I'

Dr. Marion Leroy Burton began his
official duties as University president
this morning. At an early hour he ar-
rived at his office ir University hall
and began work, where for the past 10
years ex-President Harry B. Hutchins
administered Michigan affairs.
Big Meeting Planned
Although inaugural services will not
be held until October 14 and 15, when
it is planned to have a big educational
meeting here with many prominent
speakers, President Burton started
work today. A committee, headed by
Dean John R. Effinger, is planning the
tnauguration program.
At 8 o'clock this evening in Hill
tuditorium, the president will deliver
his first speech as head of the Univer-
Iity, on the subject, "What the Schools
Must Do." Dr. and Mrs. Burton will
give a reception for students of the
Summer Session from 4:15 to 5:45
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in Alumni
hall.
Takes Bold of Work
For some weeks President Burton
has been in the city, taking hold of the
work, and everything today was con,
ducted as formerly, the only difference
being the new executive.. He received
visitors and callers on business, and
liscussed matters of University inter-
°st throughout the day.
LANSING SCHOOL
HEAD TALKS TODAY
"A Modern Educational Tendency"

our in
tion of
a visi
lost o:

Monday Morning Roll C11Answered.
by 79 Civil Engineers and
Forestry Men
MESS SHACK AND SWDlMI NG
POPULAR WITH STUDENTS

Exe cutive Committee of Regents
ceots Resignation; Appoints
Kraus Temporary ]ead -

A -

NO REASON GIVEN FOR HIS
RETIRE MEN T; IN OFFICE YEARs

ern ue-
'TEACHERI MM CIIIINT
lytb he board\p
been ac- SINLES WITH, PARENTS
ag of th
~h is bet-
ad stries FRANK CODY TELLS NEEsDS THAT
nUTQ't' REI MET TT IN ADBVANE

(By S. D. Porter, 21E)
Camp Davis, the summer school for
civil engineers and forestry students
from the University, started officially
Monday morning, when 79 surveyors.
-answered Prof.- C. T. Johnston's 61
o'clock roll call. Professor Johnston
is director of the camp. Camp Dlavis
is located on Douglas Lake, in Cheboy-
gan county, on a tract of 3,200 acres
of land owned by the University of
Michigan.

aged i:
, the c

he

etwe<
the

ring col-

.. ..e. TTl 4_ _.:, m_

hway. and Highway Transport
ion," was the subject of the
s by Prof. A. H. Blanchard, of
gineering school, in which he
vith new educational require-
in road building made necessary]
eased use of the motor trans-
a carrier for freight.
Faig Reports
J. T. Faig made a report on a
of investigations -which have
nducted for the past five years
purpose of standardization of
al nomenclature in engineering
report of the secretary and
er and discussion of reports
e various committees occupied
ainder of the afternoon session.
addresses were on this morn-
ogram in addition totmmittee
F. H. Newell, of Illinois uni-
talked on the pay of engineer-
cators. Co-operation of public
was the theme of the address
B. Shaw, of the Doherty Co.,
Cork City. Relation between
al schools and industry was
ed by C. S. Coler, of the West-
e Electric and Manufacturing
tsburgh. A paper on "Co-oper-
Vithin the Universities," by G.
hony, of Tufts college, was
rof. Anthony being unable to
the convention. Prof. Anthony'
mer president of the society.

i'..lJU , A D Al 1. 11\ LArV ~ ~J.L
OF EDU(CATION
Mr. Frank Cody, superintendent of
the Detroit city schools, was suddenly
overcome by illness while delivering
an address on the problems of a city
school administrator, Tuesday after-
noon in the Natural Science audi-
torium. Mr. Cody revived in a short
time and was able t leave the building
without assistance, but the attack pre-
vented him from completing his ad-
dress. {.r
"The confidence of the public and
of the industrial and businesk organ-
,ations is needed to secure the appro-
priation of an adequate budget," Mr.
Cody first stated in discussing the
means by which the 1920 appropria-
tion of $31,000,000 for schools in De-

I

troit was obtained.
Discussing the Americanization pro,'
gram of the schools, Mr. Cody said
that last winter 13,000 students were
enrolled in the evening high school as
against 15,000 in the day high school.
"Americanization," he stated, "is a
question of spirit and belief, not of
creed or birth, and the need of new and
prospective citizens is met along this
line."
Teachers were urged by Mr. Cody
to make themselves acquainted with
relatives of their pupils. He said bet-
ter work was done by students whos
parents were in personal contact with
their instructors. "Many pupils drop
their school work between the fifth
grade and high school, not from lack
of funds, but because the parents feel
continuation of education is not worth
the time," he stated.

Students Arrive Early
As early as Saturday morning stu-
dents began to arrive from Topinabee,
Pellston, and Cheboygan. All day the
camp was alive with men arriving,
checking in, obtaining blankets from
the storehouse, filling ticks and get-
ting settled in their sheet iron shacks
along the beach of the lake. One of
the first things upon arrival of the
students at the camp was a swim in
the lake, which was found to be ex-
ceptionally warm for a lake so large
and so far north.
On Sunday, in addition to the ar-
rival of more students by boat and
passenger train, some six or eight men
dragged into camp in old, greasy cloth-
ing, weary and gilimy, and with their
hair full of cinders. They seemed re-
luctant to state iby which train they
made the journey, but from casual re-
,marks about brake rods, blind bag-
gage, and freight cars, there was not
much doubt as to their method of
travel. -
Mless Rut Popular
Professdr Joh'nston and his able
bunch of assistants arrived early in
the week, and through their efforts the
camp is in fine shape to accommodate
the 79 students. The most important
result of their efforts is the mess
shack, which, seems to be even more
popular with the men than swimming.
The camp officers are as follows:
Camp manager, R. B. Alexander, 21E;
editor of the Black Fly, the camp pa-
per, H. G. McNamee, 21E; business
manager of the Black Fly, H. Thorn,
21E; athletic director, M. D. Van
Wagoner, 21E.

Dean Henry Kraerer, of the College
of Pharmacy, Wednesday tendered his
resignation as dean and professor of
pharmacognosy, to take effect July 1.
It was accepted by the executive
committee of the Board of Regents,
which appointed E. H. Kraus, dean of
the Summer Session, as acting dean of
pharmacy to serve until the b'oard
meets July 24,
For the past year Professor Kraemer
has been dean of the College of Pharm-
acy, having been appointed last sum-
mer. No reason was given for his
resignation.
Union To lie Opben
During Summer
All departments at the Michigan
Union wvith the exception of the bowl-
ing alley will be open throughout the
Summer Session for the use of mem-
bers of the Union who are enrolled in
the session.
A mnembership/dance is being plan-
ned for Friday night df this week, and
dances will be given each week if the
attendance warrants it. Announce-
ment will be made the first of next
week of the committee to arrange for
the summer spotlight, which will
probably take place about the 28th of
July. An effort will be made to se-
cure the participation of students.
Women with admission cards and
those with members of the Union who
take meals there will be served in the
main dining room, as the ladies' dining
room is not open.
DEAN COOLEY WILL TALK TO
ENGINEERS AT CONVOCATION
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley will ad-
dress the engineers at the Summer
school convocation, which will be con-
ducted at 11 o'clock Friday morning
in room 348 of the Engineering build-
ing, All classes will be dismissed for
the occasion,

ident in 1897-98, on President Angell's
absence in Turkey, and on the form-
er's retirement in 1909 he assumed
this office again, to be made full presi-
ddnt in 1910. Since 1916 Dr. Hutchins'
resignation has been in the hands of
the Regents, but it was not officially
accepted until last year, when deter-
mined efforts were made to find his
successor.
He, has been the author of many
books on law, and has had conferred
on him honorary degrees by Wiscon-
sin, Wesleyan, Not Dame, and Cali-
fornia universities.}
nrollment Keeps
On Upward Climb
Last night's registration figures for
the Summer. Session gave a total of
2,142, which Dean E. H. Kraus. be-
lieves will be increased by about 200
more before another week is over.
The enrollment is divided among the
colleges as follows: Literary, 1,125;
engineering and architecture, 416;
medical, 156; pharmacy, 18; law, 126,;
graduate, 261; biological station, 40.
In the literary, medical, and gradu-
ate schools, and the biological station
the enrollment reported is the largest
in their history, and the pharmacy
school is almost the same. There is
only a slight difference between this
year's enrollment and the record in the
engineering college, which will prob-
ably be overcome in a few days. The
law school is decidedly below the ree-
ord of last year.

Dr. Hutchins was made acting Ares- is the subject -of a talk at 5 o'c

1 by the ex-president, both at his home
and office.
Ex-President Hutchins, who was
born April 8, 1847, at Lisbon, N.. H.,
was graduated from the University in
1871, achieving high . honors in his
studies and in campus activities. For
a year he was superintendent of
schools at Owosso, then became an in-
structor in Rhetoric, and in 1876 took
up the practice of law. In 1884 he
re urned to the University as a pro-
fessor of law; in 1887 lie became dean
of the Cornell lw school, and he was
made dean of the Michigan soiool in
1895.
Acting President in 1897

this afternoon in the Natural Scienc
'auditorium by J. W. Sexton, superin
tendent of the Lansing schools, wh
is making a special trip to deliver thi
address. Mr. Sexton is spoken highl:
of by Dean E. H. Kraus.
President Burton's talk in the even
ing in Hill auditorium will be thefea
ture of the day, and the reception b3
Dr. Burton and Mrs. Burton Frida3
afternoon will be one of the big events
of that day.
In the evening Prof. H. R. Cross o
the Fine Arts department is to give
an illustrated lecture, "Tunisia." Pre
pared by many trips to this country
Professor Cross is expected to give a,
unusually convincing talk.
No classes will be held Monday,'ir
celebration of Independence' day, bu
on this day the' lecture ,program wil
be featured by a talk, "The Treaty o
Peace," by Prof. J. S. Reeves of the
Political Science department. Thi:
address will be strictly impersonal and
non-partisan, it being in the nature
of a scientific report upon the treaty
ONLY FEW TENNIS TICKETS
REPORTED SOLD; COST $L.M
Only a few tickets for tennis play
on the Ferry 'field courts have beer
disposed, of. The athletic field has
sold only 15, and Dr. May reported a
small sale. In addition the, tickets
may be bought at the field. Every per.
son using the court this summer i
required to show a ticket, which may
be purchased for $1.50, and it is no
transferable.

A Explains Systems
F. Shepard, of the p'sych-
meit, acquainted the so-
e principles of the faculty

transferable.

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erine

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