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August 17, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1920-08-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

IW1oe1

'Uiurizw

THRE

A WE

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 17, 1920.-

PRIC

FRESHMEN TALKS
CHANGE PLANNED
A plan whereby the "Talks to
Freshmen,' wich were inaugurated
in the literary college last year, will
he changed is being considered."
The plan under contemplation is to
have probably five talks during the
year delivered by President Marion L.
Burton. The system in use last year
provided for weekly addresses to the
yearling lits which gave them one half
hour's credit for each semseter.
Prof. Jesse Reeves of the depart-
me.nt of political science, is chairman
of the committee which is working'
on the new plan, and it is thought
that at the next committee meeting
some plan will be adopted.
LAKE-OCEAN ROUTE']
IS CMNAD S

t

u HBHNHTO RETURN EARLY

y

Present Summer Session Successful,
Say Students dnd Faculty Members

N

Other fen of 56 Iniited Back have
Not Yet Answered Associa-
tion's Letters
FRANK STEKETEE WILL BE
IN FIRST CLASS CONDITION
Thirty of the 56 men asked back
for early football training have either
written or given verbal assurance
that they will, return on time, and to
date not one has given a ne'gative ans-
wer to the letters, mailed Aug. 2.
Five "M" men are among those who
have signified their intentions, and
for the most part the others are mem-
ber's of last year's freshman aggre-
gation or were on the reserve squad.
Frank Steketee, al-American full-
back, dropped a line to P. G. .Bartel-
me, stating that he would be in fine
condition and on hand at the start of
the season.

promises
anything
an Union

in

Next Congress Will U;ndoubtedly In-
itlate Necessary Legislation,
He Declares I

by the

upper- I
PROJECT
shown PEET

WOULD HELP. RELIEVE
FREIGHT CONGESTION
'\

neI

of
at
)re
hs
rer

"The next Congress will without
doubt initiate the necessary legisla-
tion to permit the co-operation of Un-
ited States and Canada in the actual
construction of this great improve-
ment," said William H. Adams, the
chairman of the Inland Watqrways
oommittee of the Detroit board of
commerce, in his talk on "The Great
Lakes-St. Lawrence Waterway," Mon-
day afternoon.
Mr. Adams was introduced as the
man who arranged the convention in
Detroit fostering the Great Lakes to
the sea route.

rom

in-I

21, president of the
the sponsors for the
and he has been ac-
n fostering the plan
chairman of the com-1
'21, will head a body
in turn will super-
the 400 advisors.
d letters, eNxplaining
roposition, aredbeing
en, chosen for the]
ey will be familiarE
by fall. In the first
meeting will be call-
work will be unfold-'
teemen and President
talk.
Independents
expected to do for
what the upperclass-
ty do for their fresh-{
eir several freshmen
University, the ad-
ed to prove of great
them acquainted and
's.
d on Page 4)
POINT TO
ASHMEN CLASS
MORE ACCEPTED
AT THIS TIME
T YE AR
f freshmen, whose
,ccepted by the liter-
per cent larger than
t year, according to
G. Hall, whe return-1
s at the University
eral weeks vacation-
ily in the Cheneaux

SProject 1Nof 'New
According to the speaker this pro-
ject of a water route via the Great
Lakes is no new one. The Welland
canal was built by the Canadian gov-
ernment With that idea, and other
canals further down the St. Lawrence
were also constructed for that pur-
pose, but with the advent of steel irk
boat building the ships have outgrown
the canals.
Though the average lake boat can-
not take to the ocean, Mr. Adams pro-
duced evidence to the effect that the
majority of the ships now -engaged in
world trade could' ente/ practically
any port on the Great Lakes, and
that the 6,000 ton vessel, which would
be practicable, is the most profitable
boat now operating on salt water.
Costs were reviewed and it is Mr.
Adam's beliq& that freight rates on.
the water would be considerably less
than by rail and that a great deal of
'time would be saved.
Canal Being Reconstructed
The Welland canal is already being
reconstructed, Mr. Adams asserted.
The chief/obstacle left is the.40 mil-
stretch of rapids on the St. Lawrence
and it is chiefly this ;difficulty which is
occupying the attention of the inter-
national joint commission now mak-
ing a survey and analysis of the pro-
ject. The report is to be taken be-
fore Congres about the end of the
year.
Not only would the project relieve-
the rail congestion, lower freight rates
and'hncrease the volume of commerce,
but beside increasing the United
State merchant marine, it would prove
of profit in two other ways, declared
Mr. Adams. Revenues would soon pay
back the cost and more, while harn-
essing the St. Lawrence rapids to
make them navigable would incident-
ally provide waterpower 'which now,
takes thirty million tons of coal an-
nually to produce.
RAIN PREVENTS PLAY IN LAST
TENNIS TJOJRNAMENT MATCH

,Usher to Return
Eddie Jsher', 1918 halfback, and
Jack 'Perrin one of his team mates,
have both seen Harry Tillotson, as-
sistant athletic director, and assured
him that they would be on, hand.
Japk Dunn, touted as, the probable
quarterback for Yost's 1920 team, has
given his word to be on hand, as he is
working in the city this ummer.
Ernie Vick, All-Western center in
1918, has promised to be here Sept.
15, and word, was received from Duke
Dunne's folks to the effect that he
would be in as soon as possible. At
presnt the star end is competing with
the American Olympic team In the
pentathlon at Antwerp, and as the
team is not reported to sail until
Sept. 5, he may not be able to return
on time. However, his competition in
track this summer assures him being
in first class physical condition.
All in Fine Shape
Practically all of the men report'
themselves in good shape for the com-
ing season, and many of them are
WArking with the football in spare
moments. Letters from other invited
men are e pepted in every day from
now on, as many of them being away
froi home, have to have their letters
forwarded.
Leader, Avery, Kreis, Curan, Wedt-
hoff,iMarten, Kullman, Andrews, C. 0.-
Wilson, Cappon, Walters, Petro,
Searle, Peare, Wachter, Woolcott,
Perisone, McEllren, Brace, Banks,
and Weadock are others who have
already agred to return for early
work.
READING CONCLUDES
SUMMER PROGRAM

The present Summer session here
has been a decided success according'
to statements of prominent students
and members of the faculty of the
Summer session, who have come from
outside schools. A particular feature
emphasized by all was the strength
the department of education had ac-
quired.
Prof. Clifford Woody of the depart-
ment of education of the University
of Washington, said: "I am delight-
ed with the school, and my work here
has been a source of pleasure to me.
There is a good bunch of live fellows
with a fine spirit of fellowship."
Students Are Barometer
"Th~e students in the education de-
partment of a school are a barometer
of 'the character .of that school," T. J.
Knapp, superintendent of schools at
Highland Park, stated, "and I have
found students in my cfasses in ed-
ucation to be mature, serious-minded,
and a fine spirited bunch. Teaching
has been more of a pleasure to me
than it ever has before. I have found
the faculty in all cases to be a real in-
spiration to work. The administra-
tion of the Summer school promises
a big future as well as providing a sat-
isfactory present.
"I graduated in 1898 and have nev-
er been intimately associated with the
campus since until this summer. I
find about the same number of Sum-
mer students here now as there were
regular students in my time. The
new Union is a big contribution to the
life of the University men. The Ed-
ncatifial club has been a very- spirit-
ed organization.
Looks 'for Connectiong -
"I look for, a m ~h stronger con-
nection between the University and
state teachers in the immediate fut-
ure than there ever has been before."
Deputy Superintendent of Detroit I
Schools Spain stated that the present
session marks a new epoch in the es-
tablishing of a closer relation between
the University and the Detroit
schools. The University has, made a
great effort to provide a large variety
of courses which . brought Detroit
teachers here who formerly went to
Columbia or some other school, he,

3 tion of a vocational bureau guide for
Detroit. Part of his time has been
spent in that city so he has been un-
able to take part in the activities here.
He attended one meeting of the Edu-
cational club and reported that it was
one of the most interesting meetings
he had attended in years.
Shows Co-operation
"It shows a co-operation between
the teachers of the state and the Uni-
versity," he concluded.
William Anderson, assistant director
of educational research of Detroit,
says that this has been one of the
most enjoyable summers he has ever,
experienced. It is his first contact
with the University and also with the
department of education. He was im-
pressed, he said, by the spirit of unity
of the teachers of the state.
"A new era is dawning among edu-
cational ,people of the state," Ander-
son stated. "They are beginning to
realize the value of advanced train-
ing in education an'd as a consequ-
ence will be making a greater demand
upon the department of education of
the University. The department is al-
ready expanding to meet the new con-
ditions."
H Present Session Best
Harvey Lorrie of \the Mt. Pleasant
State Normal, who has spent most of
his summers here in the last few
years, said that the session this sum-
mer was the most enjoyable and had
(Continued on Page 4
.
OTHER REGENTS ACCEPT
INAUGURAL INITATIONS

said.
Mr. Spain has been working with
Prof. eorge Myers on the organiza-
ASSOCIATION RECEIVES.
FOOTBALL SUPPLIES

DUNE[ NOT AMOI
WINNING SEVEN
PENTATHION EYE
POOR PERFORMANCES ELIM1I
'tIICHIGAN'S REPRESENT.
ATIVE
JOHNSON NOT TO JUM
TILL LATER IN MI
Several Conference Men Place in
liminariesfor International
Games
Robert (Duke) Dunne, one of.
igan's two represntatives ii the 0
pic contests at Antwerp, faile
place in the pentathlon, the only
in which he was entered, Thi
an elimination process, Duke
dropped from competition befor
could get to the 1,500 meter run
specialty.
In the broad jump, the first
on the program, Dunne finished
down among the 19 contestants
leap being only 5.595 metres.
was won by BrutushHamiltou, Un
sity of Missouri, who w~as in the
ference track meet here in June.
Falls Down in Javelin
Again Duke fell down in the ja
throw, when he hurled the wood
41.25 metres, which is far worse
he should have done. This is D
best event, and although he
hardly hope to equal the best
formance of the experienced F
and Norwegians, he should have
the American contestants, but'he
the last of the four.
In the 200 metre race Dunne da
the furlong in 23 4-5 for seventh,
his other records were such tha
was eliminated. If the elimin
principle had not been empi
Duke might have stood some ch
for he vas cut out from two o
good events. In the discus he w
have finished well up in the list
he is a good miler for the penta'
event.

LOCAL BOARD PLANS MEETINGl
FOR ALL IN OUT-
OBER
There has been a large number of
acceptances to the invitation sent out1
by Regent'J. E. Beal of the .Univer-
sity, for members of boards of regents
or boards of. trustees of the state un-
iv6rsities of the country to attend the
inaugural exercises of President Mar-
ion L. Burton, which will be held here
Oct. 14 and 15.
To Discuss Problems ..
The w~Oard of Regents of tle Univer-
sity here have planned a meeting on
Oct. 16 of all members of the govern-
ing bodies of the' state universities
represented here to discuss problems
that, are confronting each -'of them
and also those problems that are con-
fronting education in general.
The chief discussion, it is thought,
will be on the' question of taking care
of the tremendous increase in enroll-
ment\ at the state universities. This
has become a great problem in all in-
stitutions of learning throughout the
land. According to educators this is
due to the awakening of the people
by the war, who now see the value
of an educatiol-'
National Ass'n May Result
It is thought that this meeting- of
the governing boards may result in a
national association .to meet at regu-
lar times to discuss .and consider
problems that are confronting them.
Such an organization might be liken-
ed to associations of college presi-
dents, deans, secretaries, and so on.

.FFICIALS MAKE READY
BIG SEASON IN
FALL

FOR

The band concert scheduled to be
given last night on the campus by the
Ann Arbor Masonic band had to be
cancelled because of the rain.
This leaves the recital by the stu-
dents in Shakespearean reading as
the second entertainment provided
this week. The recital will be given
at 8 o'clock tonight in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall and will include the read-
ing of selections from "As You Like
It." Thi's number wil conclude the'
program of lectures and entertain-
ments for the summer.
LARGE NUMBER WILL RECEIVE
DEGREES AT SUMMER TERM END
The number of students who will]
receive gradute degrees at - the end
of the Summer Session is especially
large. Thirty-five Master of Arts de-
grees will be given out at this time,
while two persons will receive the
degree of doctor of philosophy.
The cards of those who will grad-
uate at the end of the summer in the
other colleges of the University is
not known as yet as all the required
Gnes have not as yet been filled and
turned in. s
MISS BISHOP, WAR WORKER,
TO BE NEWBERRY DIRECTOR
Miss Helen Bishop, graduate of
Pacific university, Forest Grove, Ore.,
and of Columbia university, New York
City, will be te new director of Helen
Newberry residence. Miss Bishop
was formerly a teacher of. physics,
hygiene, algebra, and physical educa-
tion in the Forest Grove high school.
During the war she served seVen
months in France as a canteen work-
er.

Quantities of football supplies,
which are being received daily by the
Athletic association, insure the Uni-
versity against a repetition of last
year, when a number of candidates
for the eleven could not be taken care,
of because of lack of equipment.
Shoes, jerseys, pants, and other
equipment are comtig in by the 'doz-
lens and when everything is in, it is
expected that there will be more than
enough on hand to care for all who
turn out for football. In this way the'
Athletic association expects to build
up a permanent stock room, ordering
just enough each year to replenish the
worn out articles of the previous
year.
Large Stock on Hand
Added to the old equipment, which
was sufficient to care for the 100 men
who came out for ispring practice,
there will be enough to handle 350
men. This is by far the largest stock
that the asociation has ever had on
hand, and when everything has ar-
rived, it wil undoubtedly be stored at
the Ferry field club house.
No excuses can be offered by any-
one, stated athletic officials,:for not
coming out this year, for there will be
enough equipment to care for every
candidate. "We are preparing for a I
big season," they stated.
100 Pairs Come
One hundred pairs of shoes have
arrived, and more are on the road. A
gross of pants is being stamped with
the Athletic association marks, with
20 dozen more yet to arrive. Thirty
dozen jerseys' have come within the
last few days. Ten dozen head gears,
six dozen new shoulder pads, and two
gross of belts are among the other
things ordered by the association.
All of this has come by express, in
order to insure prompt delivery. The
goods were ordered in Januaily.

:nter Medic School
er of literary students
pplied for entrance into
school Js also large, ac-
.e registrar. It is prob-
e will not be accepted by
chool oi account of limit-
In this case all students
he combined literary-
se will be given prefer-

law is also!
s were notI

Rain yesterday prevented the last
of the final matches of the doubles
in the tennis tournament being play-
ed. Bowers and Sanchez won from
Burley and Stoddard Satarday after-
uoon 6-3', 6-4, 6-0. They will play,
Custer and Stull for the title today if
the weather permits.
ASSISTANT "Y" SECRETARY hAS
HER RESIGNATION ACCEPTED
The resignation of Miss Lenore
Chapman, assistant secretary of the-
University "Y," Lane hall, has been
accepted by the board of directors.
Miss Chapman will leave Friday for

SON OF LAW PROFESSOR TO BE
PHILIPPINE JOURNALISM MAN
The first school of journalism to
be opened in the Philippines will be
opened by Walter Wilgus, son of Prof.
Horace L. Wilgus of the law faculty.
Young Wilgus has worked on a loc-
al paper besides those of Detroit and
New York. He held , position on the
journalism faculty of the University
of Illinois until he left to begin his
new work in the Philippines. The
new school will open this month. It
is a branch of the University of the
Philippines.
STATE. SENATOR CANDIDATE,
IS GRADUATE OF UNIVERSITY
Chprles A. Sink, Republican candi-
date for State senator from the tvMlfth
district and at present a representative
in the legislature, was graduated from
the University in 1904, and since that
time he has been Connected with the
University Schol of Music, of which
he is now business manager.
He also manages the Choral union
and May festival concert course. In
addition he has held positions on im-
portant committees of the city.

Finn Wins Pentathlon
The winner of the pentathlo
E. Lothonen, Finland, who h:
points. Although he did not
first, he took four seconds
Sixth, which 4shows an excele
round performance. Everett Ei
American from the University o
sas, was second with 25 .point
Brutus Hamilton, University o
ouri, Bob Le Gendere, Univer
Georgetown, and Lorainen, 1F
were in a triple tie for third m
points. H. Lowland, Norway,
had 27 points, and Ohlsson, E
came in seventh with a total c
Carl Johnson, Michigan's oth
resentative 'in the Olympic, b
yet comupeted, the broad jump
later in the meet' If Carl pla
the games, he will have to com
his old time form, and if he doe
back, Butler of America, is thi
possible man who will defeat I
Conference Men Compate
Several men, who competed
Conference meet here in June
places in the meet, or have don
work in the preliminary trials.
Hamilton and Bradley, who pla
the pentathlon, competed in th
ference meet.
Jackson Scholz, who won t
yard dash June 5, managed to
only a fifth out of the 100 metr
which ,was a disappointment
followers who looked for his n,
a first. '-Charlie Paddock, Uni
of California, won the dash in
seconds.
A. B. Sprott, California half
who took second in the half i
the Conference, qualified 'for t
als in this event, when he was
in a 1:57 1-5 second qualifying
Scott of the Mississippi A. and
E. D. Mountain, Great Britaid,
in ahead of him.
Desch, a Notre Dame man,
third in the 400 metre hurdle
Frank Loomis, who competed o
ry field in an interscholastic
years ago, broke a. world's rec
winning this event.
America has a commanding 1
the Olympic 'games, as a res
heavy scoring in yesterday's
events, the 440 metre hurdles, I
metre dash, and the pentathlc
the beginning of the field and
events, the United States was
'lead with 57 points.

Ready
d the proof for
littei'ary an-
his correction
vill go over this

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