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August 14, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-14

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THE WEATHER
CONTINUED FAIR
TODAY

L

.uiu eri t e

AT YOUR DOO
THREE TIMES
A WEEK

VOL X. No. 22 ANN ARBOR,-MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 14, 1919 PRICE THREE C
S F-

RESEARCH PARTY
FROM UNIVERSITY
TO. LEAVE AUG. 30

PASSAGE BOOKED FOR LOND
ON LINER ROYAL
GEORGE

ON

$26,000 IN GIFTS MAKE
EXPEDITION POSSIBLE

Piof. F. W. Kelsey and Mr. G. R. Swa:
To Head Expedition in Interests
of Humanistic Research

'in

'
t

i
I

GREY T MPOR ARY
ENVOY TO U.

London, Aug. 13.-Viscount Edward
Grey, former British secretary of
state for foreign affairs, has agreed to
represent the British government at
Washington pendingthe appointment
of a permanent ambassador.
Lord Grey is consenting to go to
Washington, Andrew Bonar Law, gov-
ernment spokesman, said in the house
of commons today, in order to deal
particularly with questions arising
from the peace settlement.
Mr. Bonar Law added that a per-
manent ambassador to the United
States would be appointed next year.

496 Freshmen Already Admitted
Literary and Engineering
Colleges
LAST YEAR'S REGISTRATION
LARGER THAN EVER BEFO]
Indications point to a record enro
ment in the University next yea
With the opening of school still sev
weeks distant there have been 2
freshmen admitted to the literary co
lege and 225 to the engineering c
lege.

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en
71.
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LRGE ENROLLMENT
EXPECTED I N FA LL

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I

18 Varsity football ien Expected
Back For early Work On Sept.

Sailing Aug. 30 from New York,
Prof. F. W. Kelsey and Mr. George R.
Swain, both of the Latin department
of the University, will start their ex-
pedition through southern Europe
where they will study the ancient bat-
tlefields of Caesar in the light of the
'present war. It was announced yes-
terday that passage had been booked
to London on the liner Royal George.
Professor Kelsey will be accompanied
by Mrs. Kelsey and son, Easton.
Although it was originally announc-
ed that the expeditionary party would
be escorted by several military men,
government ruling has made this im-
possible for the fall and winter. Mili-
tary escort, however, will be provided
in the spring.
Special photographic equipment for
the expedition will be provided by the
Eastman company of Rochester,
which will shiprsupplies directly to
New York. Three cameras and one'
kodak will comnprise the picture tak-
ing facilities, but practically all the
work will be done on film, as the
plates are too cumbersome to carry1
about with such a party. Special ar-
rangements are also being made for
shipments of chemicals and other1
supplies.
Private donations amounting to
$26,000 have made possible this ex-
pedition in the intersts of humanistic 1
research,, although the University is
sponsoring the work. The survey-
ing work is expected to be completed
in about a year.r

Riflemen Leave

15

Today for Ileet,

Six Varsity football men have al-
ready announced that they will re-
port on Ferry field for preliminary
practice the middle of next month.
and definite word from the dozen other
regulars who are still numbered
among the possibilities is, expectedl
within a few days.
Captain Goetz, Czysz, Dunne, Froem-
ke, Weston, and Ward Culver are the
ones who have already agreed to come
back for the early work. while Wil-
son, Barnes, and Eades, who have yet
to win the Varsity insignia, have al-
so announced that they will, be on
hand for preliminary training under
Coach Yost.
The early work will start Sept. 15,
and approximately 30 candidates for
the 1919 Varsity are expected to re-
port on that date. The entire coach-
ing staff will be present throughout
the preliminary training, and the
early date of the Case game willf
force the men to round into shape
rapidly this fall.
Working Out Already
The presence of an unusually large
number of veterans will make i eas-
icr for the coaches to hurry alongt
the early work, as less time will be3
required for the fundamentals than is
usually devoted to this work in other
seasons. A number of the men are t
working out at frequent intervals this 1
summer so as to be in fair shape

when they report in September
The veterans who have alread
agreed to return for the early wor
insure Yost a guard, two tackles, a
end, a quarter and a halfback. T.h
is as big a nucleus of seasoned play
ers as the Michigan coach has had i
many previous years, but this fall h(
has in addition an even dozen me
from whom nothing definite has ye
been heard but whom he expects wi
be back for another year's play.
Line to Average 190 Pounds
If these men return Michigan wil
have a team made up entirely of me
who have already won their footbal
"M's". The all-Varsity line would
average 190 pounds, while any of th
backfields that could be formed of th
available veterans would averag
close to 160 pounds.
The return of a number of thes
men is, of course, still doubtful, bu
enough are certain to return to in
sure Yost a heavy, experienced line
and a fast, aggressive set of backs
In addition to the "M' 'men who ar
expected back, there are a number o
experienced men who have just failed
to win their Varsity letters in pas
years. Several of these men may be
able to land regular berths this fall
Competition is especially keen a
the end and halfback positions, there
being no less than 16 experienced men
(Continued on Page Four)

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In
et
n
II

Attorney
Draft

General Palmer
of Amendment to
Control Act

Food

i
1
1
l
i
Y

Us.S. SEIZES HUGI
STOCKS; OfFFoO
IN COLD STORA1
EGGS, CANNED GOODS, AND SU
TAKEN FROM WAREHOUSE
BY FEDERAL OFFICERS
FINE AND IMPRISONME
ASKED FOR PROFITEE

I

WH ATS GOING ON

i

August 14
5 p. m.-North Africa under Roman
Rule (Illustrated), Prof. J. G. Win-
ter.
8 p. m.-Miscellaneous readings. The
class in interpretative reading (Uni-
versity hall).
August 15
5 p. m.-The All Year School, Mr.
Paul C. Stetson, superintendent of
schools, Muskegon,. Mich.
8 p. m.-How Fishes See, Hear, and
Learn (Illustrated), Prof. J. E.
Reighard.
August 18
8 p. m.-Recital. The class in Shake-
spearean reading (University hall).
BULGARS' EX-KING STILL.
HAS FORTUNE IN SECURITIES
Geneva, Aug. 13. - The seizure in
England of securities belonging to
former King Ferdinand of Bulgaria
valued at $2,000,00 will not altogether
ruin the former monarch, according
to reliable information obtained here.
Swiss banks are said to hold his stocks
and bonds valued at nearly a million
pounds sterling. Large sums also
were placed in Hungary, where Fer-
dinand is now a fugitive with his
family.

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Under charge of Prof. C. E. Wilson,
of the mechanical engineering depart-
ment, former major'in the U. S. army,
the Michigan civilian rifle team of 12
members leaves today on the Michi-
gan Central to participate in the na-
tional matches at Caldwell, N. J.
On the state team will appear the
names of four University men in ad-
dition to that of Professor Wilson.)
George M. Gilmore, Carl H. Mason,
J. D. Lowry, and D. W. Kaufman are
the men who will be included on the
12-man team, recruited from the state
at large. At the time the work was
turned over to Professor Wilson there
remained but two men to be selected,
and these places were assigned to Gil-
moretandnMason after competitive
shooting on the local range.
The expenses for the Michigan con-
tingent will be paid by the govern-
ment, the state also being represented
by a national guard team which trav-
els under similar conditions.
Shooting in Three Classes
Shooting at the Caldwell range, the
largest in the United States, will be
conducted in three classes, the mili-
tary, civilian, and university matches
being run off separately. Because of
lack of funds at the University it was
impossible to send a team from Ann
Arbor, though a number of expertr
rifiemen were available for such anl
aggregation.
As a direct result of the agitation,
started for a rifle team in the Uni-
versity this summer,- it is expected
hat the institution will next year 'take i
up this branch of sport as a recog-z
nized activity. Enthusiasts are al-
'eady planning for a branch of the e
National Rifle association in the city.
Harilee to Command
Lieut-Col. William C. Harlleo of
he marine corps, will have command
f the range at Caldwell during theE
ontests. It was under this same
fficer that members of the Michigan c
aval militia worked while at Great s
akes Naval Training school.
In addition to the rifle matches, t
-here will be a war exhibit by the
overnment at Caldwell. In this ex-
ibit will be over $30,000 of war equip- c
nent, including one article of each
ind used during the conflict. The e
pringfield collection of arms, for the
rst time removed from the museumv
t Springfield, will be shown.n
Wounded to Assist
On the firing lines as markers, scor-
rs, and telephone men will be wound-
A members of the marine corps,
'hile one complete unit of the over-3
eas naval battery will also be pres-
nt at the meet.
While only the preliminary shoot- J
ng is now being done, together withK
ome special international matches; t
he big national match will not be '
eld until Aug. 28.
This meet will be the second for G. 2
. Gilmore, who, while commanding i
ficer at the rifle range at Annapolis, C
d., led a team at the one last year.
n

Many men, disabled during the war,
are writing to the University officials
for information concerningn the cour-
ses which they are desirous of pur-
suing, and a large number of discharg-
ed wounded soldiers are expected to
be in attendance next fall. It is also
thought that many of the men, who
dropped their college courses to enter.
the service, will return for the first
semester of next year.
University officials expect next
year's attendance to be the largest in
the history of the University.
According to figures given out Wed-
nesday, the enrollment for last year
was larger than ever before, with a
total registration of 9,546.
This number includes, however,
2,250 members of Section B, of the
S. A. T. C., only a few of whom were
regular students. Included therein
are also the Section 'A men, who were
taking academic work, but many of2
whom did not re-enroll after the de-
mobilization of the S. A. T. C.
Enrollment of 7,244
After deducting the ones who were
not students, it still leaves an en-b
rollment of 7,244 students,which isc
an'unusually large number. The total 1
number of students was divided amongo
the various colleges as follows: Col- 1
lege of Literature, Science, and then
Arts, 4,056; College of Engineering
and Architecture, 4,228; Medicalr
school, 470; Law school, 207; College h
of Pharmacy, 92; Homoeopathic Med-v
cal school, 31; College of Dental Sur- f
gery, 258; Graduate school, 303; Uni-
versity Hospital Nurses Training w
school, 145; and the' Homoeopathic E
Training school for Nurses, 36.
6,800 From MichiganV
By far the greater number of the r
tudents was drawn from Michigan, e
,800 coming from the Wolverine e
tate. Ohio was next with 588, In-
liana third with 338, and New York s
tate fourth with 314.
Every state in the Union, the Dis-
rict of Columbia, and the United
tates' possessions of Hawaii, Philip- s
ines, and Porto Rico as well as every U
ountry in the world except Armenia,
Manitoba, and Persia were represent- r
d by students at the University of
Michigan. This establishes the Uni-f
'ersity as being one of the most cos-
nopolitan in the world. a
V
Registration by States n
The states and the foreign countries 4
ith their registration follow: r
Michigan, 6,800; Ohio, 583; Indiana, b
38; New York, 314; Illinois, 246; t
ennsylvania, 239; Missouri, 67; New f
ersey, 62; Wisconsin, 57; Iowa, 48;P
:entucky, 41; Connecticut, 37; Dis-
rict of Columbia, 37; Massachusetts, S
6; Minnesota, 35; Kansas, 30; West s
'irginia, 26; Oklahoma, 24; Nebraska, c:
2; Colorado, 21; Montana, 27; Wash- s
ngton, 19; Texas, 15; Florida, 14; n
alifornia, 13; North Dakota, 12;,
outh Dakota, 12; Arkansas, 11; Ten- c
essee, 11; Idaho, 10; Maryland, 10; w
ouisiana, 9; Virginia, 9; Arizona, 8;
eorgia, 8; Alabama, 6; Nevada, 5; g
ew Mexico, 5; Oregon, 5; Rhode c
sland, 5; Utah, 6; Vermont, 4; Wy- K
rning, 4; Mississippi and New Hamp- d
hire each have two representatives, t
'hile three come from North Carolina; ic
(Continued on Page Four) e
0
lecretary Daniels Sails for Honolulu to
Aboard U. S. S. New York, at sea, ic
ug. 13.-The battleship New York,
rhich brought fame to the Ameri- 'e
an navy as the flagship of Admiral fo
odman with the British grand fleet in
uring the war began its 2,080 mile m
ruise today from Los Angeles Har- p
or to Hawaii. Secretary of the Wv
favy Josephus Daniels, with Mrs. tr

aniels and their two sons are pas- R
engers aboard the New York. r th

ANGLO-RUSSIAN OFFENSIVE
DVINA SUCCESSFUL, SAYS
LONDON

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London, Aug. 13. - Six bolshevik
battalions were destroyed in, a suc-
cessful Anglo-Russian. offensive on
the Dvina river August 10, the war
office announced today. More than
1,000 prisoners, 12 field guns and many
machine guns were captured.
The city of Vinennitza in the Uk-
raine, 125 miles southwest of Kiev,
has been abandoned by the bolshe-
viki, according to a wireless message
from Moscow. In Volhynia anti-bol-
shevik forces have occupied the rail-
way center of Lutsk, southeast of
Kovel.
Withdrawal of the bolsheviki from
Vinenitza indicates that the Ruma-
nians and anti-bolsheviki have forc-
ed the bolsheviki to retire from the
ine of the River Dniester in north-
astern Bessarabia.
rCBiesCSbrr4ectnlyr. .n theoi nn nn
Vienna, Aug. 13. - The fortress of
Dubno in southwestern Volhynia,
outheast of Lutsk has been captured
rom the bolshevik forces by the
Ukrainian army, according to Uk-
ainian reports received here today.
Washington, Aug. 13.-Material aid
or Admiral Kolchak's retreating
rmy in Siberia is being rushed to
Vladivostok by the American govern-
ient. It was said officially today that
5,000 rifles and several million
ounds of ammunition already had
een sent from San Francisco and
hat additional equipment would go
orward this week on an army trans-
ort.
The amount of material ordered to
iberia was not disclosed, 'but, was
aid to be "very large" and to in-
Lude motor vehicles and medical
applies as well as rifles and ammu-
ition. The original consignment
vas increased materially after the re-
ent reverses of Kolchak's army, it
'as said.
Munitions being sent the Kolchak
overnment comprise materials pur-
hased here through the original
Cerensky government from the war
epartment. The rifles were from
hose being manufactured by Amer-
cai firms when this country enter-r

Peoria, Ill., Aug. 13.-Two mem-
bers of the Keystone Wire and Steel
company, Reuben Sommers, 19, son
of P. W. Sommers, assistant chemist
of the plant, and Alvin Sommers, 19,
son of John Sommers, assistant :gen-
eral superintendent, were shot as they
were leaving the plant late this af-'
ternoon in an automobile with other
officials of the company.
Frank Rudolph of Chicago, a strike-
breaker and watchman at the gate,
was shot in the back by snipers.
Peoria, Ill., Aug. 13.-Two execu-
tives of the Keystone Steel and Wire
company were shot in the face with
a shotgun tonight as they left the
grounds in company with Representa-
tive Charles W. La Porte, assistant to
the president of the company.
Armed strikers are firing at irregu-
lar intervals.
State troops have been asked for,
according to information here.
The injured are said to be in a crit-
ical condition.
Trouble began this morning when
125 strikebreakers, said to have been
imported from Chicago and James-
town, Pa., were taken into the Key-
stone Steel and Wire company plant
at South Bartonville, near here.
The first shot was fired by one of
the twenty-five special deputies, pro-
tecting the strikebreakers.
The strikers returned the fire. Two
men were reported wounded, but the
report could not be verified.
Springfield, Ill., Aug. 13.-On re-
ceipt of word from Peoria tonight of
strike rioting Gen. Frank Wells of
the 2d brigade started for. Peoria to
investigate the situation. It was said
at the adjutant general's office that no
formal request for troops had been"
made.
160 MILES OF MOVIE FILMS ;
TAKEN OF A. E. F. IN WAR
Washington, Aug. 13.-One hundred1
and sixty miles of motion negatives1
and more than 47,000 still pictures of

{1
1
1
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I

_

ILIED FORCES DESTROY
0 BOLSHEVIK BATTALIONS

PEORIA STRIERS SHOOT
2 COMPANYEXECUTIVES
RIOTERS ATTACK MEMBERS OF
KEYSTONE WIRE AND STEEL
COMPANY
Bulletin

ON

[Q .
e Jacksonville, Fla., Aug. 13.-M
e than a million eggs, hundreds of the
e sands of tins' of canned foods a:
27,500 pounds of sugar were seiz
e here today in a raid on wholesale fo
t warehouses and cold storage plan
- by federal officers.
e,
Chattanooga, Tenn., Aug. 13.
e Eighty-four thousand dozen eg
f stored with the Atlantic Ice & Co
d corporation here for the account
t Morris & Co., of Chicago, were seiz
today by the United States district a
torney. Seizure was made under lib
t proceedings in the federal cour
which charged that the eggs were u1
a lawfully stored for the purpose
unreasonably increasing prices.
Washington, Aug. 13.-The first fe
eral conviction for profiteeringtwa
reported today to the deartmiet
1 justice. District Attorney Lucey tel
graphed Attorney-General PalmE
from Binghamton, N. Y., that a reta
grocer had been fined $500 in the fec
eral court for selling sugar at 15 cent
a pound.
Toledo, O., Aug. 13.-Two compar
ies and six individuals were indicte
by the Lucas county grand jury lt
today, charged with violation of th
Valentine anti-trust law. The indict
ments were the first results of th
grand jury investigation into foo
profiteering.
Those indicted were: H. A. Hoffma:
company, Cleveland, dealers in provi
sions, operating a branch in Toledo
Rock Island Butter company; Sa
and Benjamin Bellman, who operat
a chain of 12 groceries' in Toledo;
F. Bailey, secretary-treasurer an
manager, W. F. Stevenson and J. I
Klots, agents of the Rock Island But
ter company.
Washington, D. C., Aug. 13.-T
bring to book persons guilty of rais
ing prices exorbitantly or hoarding
food to advance prices, Attorney Gen
eral Palmer submitted today to the
agriculture committees of congres:
the draft of an amendment to the foo
control act, extending its provisions t
clothing and containers of foods an
feeds, and providing a penalty o
$5,000 fine or two years imprisonmen
or both for violation of the law.
Chairman Haugei, of the house
committee, announced the amendmen'
would be considered immediately b
a subcommittee and that a repor
might be made tomorrow. It is Mr
Palmer's idea that that amendmen
should be considered before taking u
others suggested by President Wilson
Three cabinet officers asked specia
appropriations from congress for the
campaign against inflated prices. Sc-
(Continued on Page Four)
UNITED STATES TO SEND
MISSION TO STUDY ARMENIA
Paris, Aug. 13. - Major-Genera:
James G. Harbord, chief of staff o
the American Expeditionary force
will leave Paris soon at the head o:
a mission which will visit Armeni
and Transcaucasia under instructions
from President Wilson, transmitted
through Frank L. Polk, assistant sec-
retary of state, to investigate condi-
tions there from a military view-
point.
General Harbord's mission is dis-
tinct and apart from any other now in
those countries. He will especially
inquire into conditions in the new Ar-
menian republic and by personal in-
vestigation on the ground obtain
complete information indicating what
questions would -be involved in tak-
ing over and administering that coun-

try.
He will also verify such existing in-
formation as there is regarding the
'Armenian republic and other govern-

WARDENS MASTER UPPER
MICHIGAN FOREST FIRES
Sault Ste. Marie, Aug. 13. - Fire
wardens, aided by many volunteer
helpers, today continued their fight
against forest and bush fires in this
section. Most villages in Chippewa
county are believed safe. Railroads
are keeping their right of way wet by
using tank cars as sprinklers. Lifting
of the smoke cloud has permitted re-
sumption of navigation.

HALIL PASHA FUGITIVEj
ESCAPES WITH ANOTHER
Constantinople, Aug. 13. - Halil
Pasha, former minister of marine and
uncle of Enver Pasha, former minister
of war, has escaped to Asia Minor
twith Kritchelk Talaat, another leader
of the Committee of Union and Prog-
ress. It is believed he will join Mus-
'tapha Kiamil Pasha in Erzerum.

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA .
RECEIVES $1,500,000 GIF'
San Francisco, Aug. 13.-A gift o
26,000 shares of stock in the Pacifi
Improvement company, valued a
$1,500,000, has been made to th
University of California by Edwar

11

PREMIERS TO CONFER SOON
ON ADRIATIC QUESTION

I

d the war, of which more than 150,-! army activities were produced during
00 were completed before the fac- the war, Secretary Baker informed
ries were put to work on the Amer- congress today in requesting passage
an modified Enfield rifle. of legislation authorizing the war de-
Shipment of hospital and subsist-; partment to sell duplicates of the neg-
!ce supplies has been in progress atives.
or some months, but, according to Mr. Baker also recommended legis-
nformation here, the equipment ship- lation to authorize the department to
ents are recent. Government trans- print in book form, for sale to the
orts have been allotted, since this' public, photographs of the war. H%
as the only available means ofs estimated the pictures would make
ansportation to Vladivostok. The 12 volumes of 40 pages each, and that
ussian authorities will be charged the cost price would be $1.50 a vol-
he regular tonnage rate. ume, exclusive of the selling cost.

c Milan, Aug. 13. - Premier Nitti, of
It Italy;. Premier Clemenceau and Pre-
e mier Lloyd George plan to meet on
d the Franco-Italian frontier the middle
t, of August to confer upon the Adriatic

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