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August 09, 1919 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-09

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THE WOLVERINE

----

[IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

/

Regular Session 1919-1920 begins September 30
For information address the Dean or Secretary
of that School or College of the University in

which you are interested, or

SHIRLEY W. SMITH,
Secretary of the University

DFFICIAL PRINTERS

to the

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

BOLSHEIPOWER GROWS
IN RUSSIASAYS '14 MIN
(Continued from Page Three)
very importantly at the fire, with sev-
eral barrels of water aboard to put
out the flames.
"Then, before they start to work,
they have a consultation. As far as I
can make out, it is to decide the order
of preference. The Russians are very
polite. The fire I saw burned merrily
along, while the council deliberated.
Russian Country Life
"In the country, life is very differ-
ent. The peasants are very poor and
their huts usually have but o;ne room
The most prominent feature of it is
the stove, which is a large brick af-
fair, raised off the ground. The dos
pigs, and ducksare generally to be
found underneath, while at night
everybody sleeps on top.
"The worst part of the life we led
in Russia was the extreme cold. The
temperature in winter is always
around 35 to 50 degrees below zero,
and we used to wear so many clothes
that all you could see was our eyes.
Then, if the Bolos were anywhere
around, we would dress in long, flow-
ing robes, looking like priests. This
was to hide ourselves against the
snow.
"But the best part of it all," he con-
cluded, "was getting back again. I
came back on a hospital ship. We
were in Brest the same day President
Wilson sailed for home. Our ship
landed in New York a few days after
the 339th. I was so glad to get back,
and so eager to get home, that when
they asked me if I was feeling all
right, I said I was never better. They
couldn't understand my speedy re-
covery."
WESBROOK WINS WAY INTO
TENNIS TOURNAMENT FINALS
Walter Wesbrook, Michigan Varsity
tennis star, won his way into the final
round of the state championship tour-
nament at Detroit Friday by defeat-
ing Ira Reindel, another former Uni-
versity star. The match went in
straight sets, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4.
Wesbrook will 'meet Walter T.
Hayes, of Chicago, in the final round
this afternoon. The Detroiter will at
this time defend the Michigan state
title he won on the Detroit Tennis
club courts !, year ago. While Hayes
has the edge onWesbrook in exper-
ience, the Michigan star has been
playing a phenomenal game during
the present tournament and one of
the closest matches of the year is ex-
pected when the two clash today.
Hayes wo nhis semi-final match
with Kaiser in straight sets without
over-exerting himself.
CAMP ARRANGES ATHLETIC
PROGRAM FOR VISITORS' DAY
(Continued from Page One)
the winners to play the Black Owls
for the championship of the camp.
With sighs of relief, the fellows see
the black-fly season drawing to a
close. Although they have not been
very bad this year everyone rejoices
in the day when they will be no more.
Forest fires seem to be entirely ex-
tinct on University land. Parties have
traversed the burned areas but have
found no signs of further fires.
13,000,000 LIVES LOST TO
GERMANY BY WORLD WAR
Geneva, Aug. 8.-Germany really,
lost 13,000,000 lives as a result of the
war-6,000,000 soldiers and 7,000,000
in the deficit of the birth rate-ac-

cording to statistics made public by
the German Society for the Study of
Social Consequences of the War.
Austria's loss-is put at 5,000,000.
PICTURESQUE PERSIAN ENVOY
MAKES BOW TO WASHINGTON

INTERIOR VIEW OF ALUMNI MEMORIAL HALL

and by authority

OF ITS STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
'HE ANN ARBOR DRESS
RUNNING DAY AND NIGHT
PRESS BUILDING, MAYNARD ST.
OUR WORK IS LIKE OUR PHONE

NO. 1

t

Mremorial Clock
Sl opgs, 2WThen-
(H. L. H.)
The rooms of Memorial hall are
large and noiseless, with lurid por-
traits staring from the walls and
bronze supermen waiting in the
shadows. A new bronze clock was
recently brought there, having been
presented to the Alumni association
of the University by the memorial
committee, of which Claudius B.
Grant, '59, of Detroit, is chairman.
And this modern piece of mechanism,
after being duly set up on the mantel
of the southwest room of Memorial
hall, refused for some time-it i said
-to perform the essentials of an
well regulated clock-to strike the
hour o'day.
Perhaps it felt the atmosphere; per-
haps silence did not seem inappro-
priate.
Memorial hall stands today as a
monument to the Michigan soldiers
of three wars. There is a red volume
-carefully encased-with a record of
the names of all Michigan men of the
past wars. All except the last and
greatest war; many additional names
should go within those pages now.
Strange, isn't it, that even memorials
must be modernized?
Although the building serves a
variety of purposes-there are read-
ing rooms, club rooms, class rooms
and offices-its original purpose, to
serve as a memorial, is still maintain-
ed. That is why art collections and
antiques predominate. Rare pieces
are being added all the time. In the
corridors arecases containing Roman
dice, armlets, necklaces, bracelets,
perfume bottles-all the mystic irrele-
vancies of another civilization. The
old marble tablets, however, bearing
original Greek and Latin inscriptions,
are now being removed.
"Some people want everything prac-
tical," says the assistant curator.
"There is a subject for you,-the prac-
ticability of art."
The place of honor is occupied by
the "Victory of Samothrace," a statue
especially remarkable as a memorial,
defying time and expressing triumph.
But the most popular piece, one is
told, is the Laocoon group, before
which crowds of people pause to re-
late the Trojan story so that their
children may hear. Has a myth any
value?
The upper galleries are hung with
pictures which are primarily of im-
portance to Americans, being quite
modern and many of them -done by
American artists. The last room con-
tains an exhibition of Michigan's own
art as produced by Michiganmartists
and architects. These are most in-
teresting of all-these designs for a
campus, theater, these studies in still
life, these studies in human form. In
the same building, Murillo, Bauger-
eau, John Smith, '20, of Michigan,-
how refreshing.
_ Perhaps thisgis the thing that keeps
Memorial Hall alive in spite of all the
chatter about the impracticability of
art. Perhaps warm blood is vitaliz-
ing the broken marble pieces, finding
new interpretations in the old. Any-
way, the little bronze clock caught
the big idea and did not remain silent
long. They say it was only some
packing papersin the back that held
the pendulum.
ASIA MINOR COMMAND GIVEN
TO BRITON BY CONFERENCE

YOU will find cool drinks
and luncheons at
709 N. University
Save You Srngh
Just think how you waste your health and strength every
day you spend doing the washing over a hot steaming wash
tub, when it is entirely unnecessary-there is a better, easier
way.
The electric washing machine will wash your clothes as
well or better than you can-it never gets tired because the
little electric motor has no back to ache-it does the work
quicker and at a very low cost.
Isn't it worth considering? What is a few dollars as
compared to the saving of your time, your clothes, your health
and strength?
Come in and let us show you what this machine will do
for You.
THE DETROIT EDISON COMPANY
MAIN AND WILLIAM STREETS
ANN ARBOR
GRUEN WATCHES
SILVERWARE CUT GLASS
LEATHER GOODS
ALARM CLOCKS FOUNTAIN PENS
FINE JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIRING
H ALLEMR FVLLE R
STATE STREET JEWELERS

, a// 1-yoar4.outtd soft' driak
For businoss Mon,prof$ssional
mon, men of sports -jolf,
bowling,tennb,shoeting~4dfng,
For overybody, ovorywhore,
the yoar'round. Bovo is halo
rafreshment for wholesome
thirst---an invigoratiln soft-
drink. Ideal for the atbiOto
or the man in physical or
menial trainin6.'- ood to
train and gdin on. $oalth.
ful and apptizing.
Sold averywhoro "-rwImilios suppliod by
frocor, druiist and dealer.
Mslteware cordially1wIto spc tow. planE
ANHEUSER-SBVOCg1 ST.LOUIS

Washington, Aug. 8.--East met
westhat the White House today. Clad
in the picturesque garb of the Far
East, Mirza Abdul Ali Khan, Sadigh-
es-Saltaneh, the new Persian minister,
to the United States, was officially!
welcomed by President Wilson.
France Lifts German Language Ban
Metz, Aug. 8.-Owing to the dim-
inution of the German population of
Lorraine and because of the difficulty
many Alsations and Lorrainers have
in speaking French, the prohibition
against the speaking of German after
10 o'clock p. m. has been abolished
and the prohibition against use of the
German language in the tramways
also has been removed.
Polish Troops Occupy Minsk
Paris, Aug. 8.-Dispatches from
Warsaw carry the announcement by
the newspapers there that Polish
troops have occupied the city of
Minsk.
Patronize our advertisers.

4Mc

Constantinople, Aug. 8.-Lieuten-
ant-General Sir George Francis Milne
commander of the British forces at
Saloniki, has been given authority by
the peace conference, pending its ul-
timate decisions, to control all Allied
troops in western Asia Minor and to

restore order in the Smyrna district. Read The Wolverine for Campus
General Milne has been made respon- news.
sible for the delimitation of the zone
of Greek military occupation. Use The Wolverine for results.

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