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June 28, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-06-28

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HEI

CONTINTED FAIR
TODAY

.d

alu rt t e

AT YOUR DO
THREE 'TIMES

A WEEK

X No.2

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JUNE 28, 1919

PRICE THREE C

..

iTRONG PROGRAhM
SCHEDULED FOR
SUMMER SCHOOL

DUean Predicts
Vg Attendance
I a lnhoeful, optimistic, that the
attendance of the Summer school will
even exceed that of 191G, which was
our best year."

14 NOTABLES IN
HONORARYUDGREES
Representatives of Many Professions
Given Recognition by
University
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS HONORS
TWO COMMIHENCEMENT SPEAKERS
Fourteen men prominent in educa-
tion, legal, military, journalistic, en-
gineering, and medical circles were

"

URES WIILLI E VIVEN
MANY PRtOIMINEN'T'
El) CA T'OllS

BY

O ADMISSION FEE FOR
MOST OF ATTRACTIONS

ucatlonal 'ietires, Concerts,
Exeursions on List of
Entertainiments

and

Free lectures and entertainments
for the amusement and instruction of
;summer school students constitute a
program on which noted professors of
thAs and other universities will appear.
The lectures will deal principally
with current and special educational
topics, and unless otherwise specified,
will be held in the Natural Science
auditorium. Visitors' night at the Ob-
servatory and the excursions to
Niagara, Falls and Put-in-Bay are the
only ones for which there will be any
charge.
Educational motion pictures and re-
citals by the faculty of the University
School of Music are some of the big
attractions of the program.
Students and others desiring to go
on the excursions to Niagara Falls,
July 18, or to Put-in-Bay on August
3, are requested to consult as early
as possible with Prof. I. D. Scott or
Mr. F. W. Frostic in the Natural Sci-
ence building. Admission to the Ob-
servatory on visitors' night is secur-
ed only by means of tickets which
may be obtained at the office of the
summer session upon presentation of
the treasurer's receipt for fees.
The following program is subject to
revision, and corrections will be pub-+

This statement, made Friday by
Dlean Edward H. Kraus indicates that
119 is to be the banner year in the
history of the Summer school. Un-
ofiicial figures at this time show an
increase of more than 500 enrollments
over last year, and it is estimated
that the attendance will reach the
1,900 mark. Applications for admis-
sion are constantly coming in, both
by mail and in person, a large num-
ber of enrollments having come in by
mail this year. It is expected that
today's registration will swell the
total attendance considerably..
Available figures'show that the big-
gest year for the Summer school ses-
sion was in 1916, at which time the
attendance in all colleges was 1,793.
The following year the attendance
dropped to 1,449, and last year, due to
war conditions the enrollment drop-
ped to 1,304.
PLANS COMPLETED
FOR CHORAL UNION

shed in The
p. m.-The
W. A. Fray

Wolverine:
June 30
Russian. Situation, Prof.
er.

July 1
5 p. m.-With the American Red Cross
in Italy, Prof. H. R. Cross.
8 p. m. -Some Facts the Laity should
know about Syphilis, Prof. U. J.
Wile.
July 2
5 p. m.-Navigation on the Great Lakes
and on the High Seas (Illustrated),
Prof. R. H. Curtiss.
8 p. m.--Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).
July 8
3 p. m.-The Teacher's Philosophy of
Life and Happiness, Prof. W. H.
Pyle, of the University of Missouri.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
July 4
5 p. m.--America in France, Prof.
Rene Talamon, lieutenant in the
French army.
July 7
5 p. m:-The Problems of Volcanism
(Illustrated), Prof. W. H. Hobbs.
8:30 p. m.-Visitors'iight at the Ob-
servatory, admission by ticket only.
July 8
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Litera-
ture as represented by Christopher
Marlowe, Wiliam Shapespeare, and
Richard Cumberland, Rabbi Louis
Wolsey, Cleveland, 0.
8 p. m.-Some Interesting Phases in
the Development of Dentistry (Illus-
trated), Prof. N. S. Hoff.
8:30 p. m.-Visitors' night at the Ob-
servatory, admission by ticket only.
July 91
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Litera-
ture as represented by Walter Scott
and Charles Dickens, Rabbi Louis
Wolsey, Cleveland, O.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).
8:30 p. m.-Visitors night at the Ob-
servatory, admission by ticket only.
July 10
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Litera-
ture as represented by Benjamin
Disraeli, Robert Browning, and
George Eliot, Rabbi Louis Wolsey,
Cleveland, O.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
July 11W
5 p. m.-Reception by the President
for the students of the Summer ses-
sion (Alumni Memorial hall).
8 p. m.-Cosmopolitan night, by the
Cosmopolitan club (University hall).
July 14
5s n m.-The Racial Heritage of the

Final plans for the formation of a
Summer Choral union havebeen com-
pleted and on July 8 the organization
will begin work. This year the work
will be under the direction of Dr. A.
A. Stanley and Mr. Earl V. Moore, of
the School of Music.
Immediately upon organization,
work will be started on the "Narcis-
su," by Massenet. This will be prac-
tised until about the last of August,
at which time it will be presented at
a concert to be held under the aus-
pices of the Choral union.
It has been announced that all stu-
dents of the School of Music, Univer-
sity and Summer school students, and
town people are eligible to try out for
the Choral union. There will be no
fees charged in connection with mem-
bership and it is hoped that a large
number of students will avail them-
selves of this privilege.
MUSIC TEACIERS WILL HOLD
NEXT YEAR'S MEET IN I)ETROIT
Flint, June 27.-Before closing tis
annual convention here Friday, the
Michigan Music Teachers' association
selected Detroit for its next meeting
place. Francis L. York, of Detroit,
was elected president; George Oscar
Bowen, of Flint, vice-president; J. G.
Cummings, Saginaw, secretary; Mel-
ville Chase, Hillsdale, treasurer; S. E.
.Clark, Detroit, auditor.. The com-
bined conventon and June music fes-
tival program ended with a free public
concert by the community chorus and
'orchestra of Flint, assisted by a quar-
tet of New York soloists.
MEXICAN WAR DEPARTMENT
EXPERIMENTS WITH TANKS
Mexico City, June 27.-The War de-
partment is constructing a tank on
original lines with the announced
purpose of using this engine of war-
fare, new to Mexico, in campaigns
against rebels.
3,400 U. S. Planes Ready for Service
Washington, June 27.-Army aero-
planes in commission or available for
immediate service number 3,400, it
was officially announced today after
an inventory had been made at all air
service fields and stations over the
country. Several hundred additional
planes are in storage with engines
removed, but these could be re-equip-
ped within a week.
United States Lends Nearly 10 Billion
Washington, Juen 27.-Credits to-
taling $65,000,000 were established'by
the treasury department today in fav-
or of France, Italy and Rumania, mak-
ing a total of $9,455,219,124.27, to all
the Allies. France was -allowed $50,-
000,000; Italy $10,000,000, and Rou-
mania $5,000,000.
Forest Fires in Upper Peninsula
Manistique, Jnue 27. - Due to a
prolonged dry spell forest fires are
raging through this section. Four
Goodman Cedar company camps are
reported destroyed. Crop losses will
be heavy if the dry weather cntin-

awarded honorary degrees at the 75th
annual Commencement day exercises
of the University held Thursday.
Those to reecive honorary degrees,
and their characterizations as pro-
nounced by President Harry B. Hutch-
ins are as follows:
Master of Arts-Gustavus Augustus
Ohlinger, Toledo, O. A graduate of
the University of Michigan, literary
college in 1899, and of the Law school
in 1902. a member of the bar, who,
notwithstanding a large and varied
practice, finds the time for civic and
patriotic services of a high order; dis-
tinguished in public work, particular-
ly for his forceful and effective-writ-
ings and addresses upon the insidious
German propaganda in connection
with the world war.
Stewart Hoffman Perry, Adrian,
Mich. A graduate of the University,
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts in 1894, an editorial writer of
widely recognized merit, whose lucid,
vigorous and constructive contribu-
tions upon the great questions of the
hour attract wide attention and re-
ceive most generous and deserved com-
mendation.
Soldier Awarded Degree
Gen. Isaac Hughes Elliott of New
York, a graduate of the literary college
of the University in the war class of
1861. Going directly from the class
room to the front, he rendered most
effective service in the great struggle
for humane freedom; a brave soldier,
an orator, a loyal alumnus whom his
Alma Mater delights to honor.
Hon. Alfred Budge of Idaho, a grad-
uate of the University in the law class<
of 1892; for many years a distinguish-
ed practitioner of law in state and fed-
eral courts; elevated to the bench in
1903, he, for more than a decade,
rendered most effective service as
judge of the . Fifth judicial district,
Idaho; promoted to the state supreme
court, he became chief justice of the
highest judicial tribunal of his com-
monwealth. Learned and painstaking,
reaching conclusions only when fully
informed and withal a man of storl-
ing qualities. Justice Budge enjoys
the confidence and esteem of bench1
and bar alike andof the people gen-I
:erally.
Cornell Man Honored
Master of Engineering - Andrew1
Heatley Green, Jr., of Detroit, a grad-
uate of Cornell university in 1892,
in the department of mechanical en-
gineering; for many years and still
the general manager of the Detroit
branch of the Solvay Process company1
and a member of the board of direc-
tors of that company; in the service of
his country as a member of the ma-
rine contingent during the Spanish'
American war and for a time, during
the world war, as general manager ofI
the Red Cross in Italy; a man of far-E
seeing executive ability, who, thoughi
caring for large interests and carry-
ing heavy responsibilities, finds the
time to take an active part in civicZ
(Continued on Page Five) I

Higher Surveying Work
Training in the camp will comprise,
for the most part, work in higher sur-
veying, with the exception of the
work in forestry. This will include
both field and class work. The main
emphasis, however, will be laid on the
practical outdoor work. In accord-
ance with the general plan of im-
provement, a certain amount of work
will be done in the surveying of roads
through the reservation.
Pastime Activities
Besides the serious training 'of the
camp there will be many activities with
which the students will spend their
spare time. There will be athletics
and swimming foi' all who enjoy that
sort of pastime and an orchestra for
those musically inclined. A new
piano which has been purchased and
sent to the camp will be a great help
to the orchestra, which promises to be
the best of any previous camp orches-
tras.
The camp every year publishes a
camp paper called the Black Fly. Be-
cause it'is published in the blue print
form, this paper occupies a unique
place in the field of journalism. It is
published by the students of the
camp and will cover all of their ac-
tivities. To the editor falls the tedious
job of printing and composing the pa-
per by the mechanical drawing meth-
od, which is in itself a very tedious
job.
LAST SEMESTER'S MARKS WILL
BE MAILED OUT NEXT WEEK
The great annual event that some
students look forward to, with joy,
while others dread without measure,
has been delayed a few days. The
event in question is the annual mail-
ing out of last semester's grades to
the homes of the students. Work is
now being rushed so that all of the
grades will be in the mails by the
middle of the week.

Seventy Leave
For Camp Davis
Seventy students who are enrolled
for the summer work at Camp Davis
left Friday morning to take up their
duties. They were accompanied by
Prof. Clarence T. Johnston and several
other professors' and instructors who
will have charge of the summer
work.
Camp Davis is an institution that
has long been a part of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. The first camp was
organized in 1874 and was held at
Whitmore lake. Between that date
and 1909 the camp enjoyeda some-
what roving life, being held each year
at a different place. In 1909 the Uni-
versity bought the present site and
since that time the camp has been
held there annually. It is situated
about 13 miles west of Cheboygan and
about 20 miles northeast of Petoskey.
New Land and Buildings
It has been the policy of the Univer-
sity to improve the camp from year
to year. This season the University
has not only bought some adjoining
land, now bringing the reservation up
to 3,200 acres of fine land, but has
also made building improvements. The
living quarters of the students have
been enlarged by the addition of 10
steel buildings to the group of 40 al-
ready constructed. With these im-
provements the camp is now consid-
ered to be admirably suited to both
forestry and surveying work, as well
as being able to accommodate more
students.'

WILLIAM WHEELER TO HEAD VOCAL
DEPARTMENT' OF SCHOOL OF MUSIC,
SUCCEEDING THEODORE HARRISO1

COL. LUCAS WILL TEACH
MILITARY SCIENCE HERE
Washington, June 27. - Lieut.
Col. John P. Lucas, signal corps,
has been detailed as professor of
military science and tactics at the
University of Michigan. Captain
Joseph Daley, sanitary corps, has
been ordered to proceed to Detroit,
Adrian, Ann Arbor, Hillsdale, Lan-
sing, Kalamazoo and Holland to
investigate accounts against the
i government for the treatment of
the sick and wounded of the va-
rious Students' Army Training
corps units at these cities and as-
sisting in and expediting the prep-
aration of vouchers for the settle-
ment of these claims.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Monday, June 30
5 o'clock-Prof. W. A. Frayer speaks
on "The Russian Situation," in the
auditorium of the Natural Science
building.
Tuesday, July 1
5 o'clock-Prof. H. R. Cross speaks
on "With the American Red Cross in
Italy" in the auditorium of the Natural
Science building.
8 o'clock-Prof, U. J. Wile speaks
on "Some Facts the Laity Should
Know About Syphilis" in the auditor-
ium of the Natural Science building.
Wednesday, July 2
.5 o'clock-Prof. R. H. Curtiss gives
an illustrated lecture on "Navigation
on the Great Lakes and on the High
Seas," in the auditorium of the Nat-
ural Science building.
8 o'clock-Concert' by Mr. Earl V.
Moore, organist; Dr. M. C. Wier, cel-
list; Mr. James Hamilton, tenor; in
Hill auditorium.
Thursday, July 8
5 o'clock-Prof. W. H. Pyle, of the
University of Missouri, speaks on "The
Teacher's Philosophy of Life and Hap-
piness,' in the auditorium of the Nat-
ural Science building.
8 o'clock--Educational Motion Pic-
tures.
Friday, July 4
5 o'clock - Prof. Rene Talamon
peak on "America in France," in the
,auditorium of the Natural Science
building.
EREMITES MERGE WITH THETA
CHI, AS ALPhA GAMMA CHAPTER
The Eremites, organized at the
University in 1911, have merged with
Theta Chi, of which they become Al-
pha Gamma chapter. The action was
taken recently after an almost unani-
mous vote in the affirmative by the
active and alumni members.
Theta Chi is one of the oldest gen-
eral fraternities in the United States,
having been organized at Norwich
university in 1856 and now numbering
26 chapters.
More than thirty alumni of the Ere-
mites were present at the recent in-
stallation ceremonies.
SOUTH WALES ADVENTURER
RETURNS HOME FROM FRANCE
Sydney, June 28.-Sydney Atkin, who
was one of the Aurora party in Sir
Ernest Shackleton's last Antarctic ex-
pedition, has returned to his home in
New South Wales after years of ad-
venture. Atkin came back from the
French battlefields with a healed
'broken jaw, only one -lung, and sev-
eral scars. In addition he was gassed.
Atkin is about 36 years old. Prior
to joining the Shackleton expedition

he was in turn a cattle drover, a coast
artilleryman, a soldier in the South
African war, and a sailor.
MICHIGANENSIAN .NOTICE
Holders of coupons for the 1919
Michiganensian. must present
them at once or the books will be
sold. The book is on sale to non
subscribers in room 1, Press
building.. ~

IS VICTOR ARTIST AND NOTED
ORATORIO AND CONCERT
SINGER
CARTER SUCCESSOR TO
MISS FLORENCE POTTER
Will Drect Teaching of Public School
School Music in Ann
Arbor
Mr. William Wheeler, a Victor ar-
tist and a noted singer of oratorio
and concert nusic, Nv 11 come to An
Arbor next fall to head the vocal de-
partment of the University School of
Music, a position to which he has
been appointed following the resigna-
tion of Mr. Theodore Harrison.
Mr. Russell Carter of Amsterdam,
N. Y., will succeed Miss Florence B.
Potter as director of the public school
music department.
The preceding announcements were
made Friday afternoon by Mr. Charles
A. Sink, secretary of the School of
Music.
Mr. Wheeler has done a great deal
of research work in the field of folk-
songs of which he has made, together
with his wife who is also a vocalist
of some reputation, approximately 40
records. In concert work he ha#
specialized in the music of the 16th
and 17th centuries, Mr. Arthur Whit-
ing acting as his accompanist on the.
harpsichord.
Sings at Unversities
He has appeared in recitals held at
several of the large easirn universi-
ties, and as a church singer for the
past six years has held two of the
most important positions in New York
City-St. Bartholemew's and Temple
Emmanuel.
Mr. Wheeler is a graduate of Beloit
college, class of '00. While in college
he was leader of the glee club and
fullback on the football team. If Mr.
Wheeler's interest in college activi-
ties may be taken as a criterion, he
will be well adapted to his new en-
vironment.
Mr. Carter's Training
Mr. Carter, who comes to fill Miss
Potter's place, is an alumnus of the
Institute of Musical Art, New York
City. He has studied extensively in
music and pedagogy in New York uni-
versity and in the Northampton Insti-
tute of Music Pedagogy; has had sev-
eral years experience as supervisor
of music. in public schools and state
normal colleges; has served as lec-
turer on public school music at the
University of California; as teacher'
in the New York State College for
Teachers, and as examiner for several
y rs for the New York state depart-
ment of education.
For a number of years he has filled
important positions as organist, and
as choir master in leading churches
of Amsterdam, Albany, and Brooklyn,
and has been the leader of the Albany
community chorus.
Miss Potter to Continue
Miss Potter will continue in public
school music work as an associate of
Mr. Carter.
Announcements from the School of
Music have been awaited with great
interest by the Ann Arbor public ever
since it became known that Mr. Har-
rison, present head of the vocal de-
partment, had accepted a position with
a Chicago school of musical art. Many.
inducemnts were offered to Mr. Har-
rison that he might remain here, but
his decision has been in favor of the
metropolitan school. He will not,
however, leave Ann Arbor until fall,
continuing his classes here through-
out the summer.
HINDU-AMERICAN GARB CAUSES

STIR IN REGISTRAR'S OFFICE
Among the students who registered
yesterday for the Summer school is
K. Singh of Punjab India. Quite a
stir was caused in the Registrar's of-
fice when Singh walked in dressed in
a regular American suit but wearing
the wrapped turban of India.
Singh has been in the United States
for about a year and a half, during
which time he has been -studying at
the University of Illinois. While here
in Summer school he will take ad-
vanced studies in physics.

PRE SBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Streets
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10:30 A. M. Beginnings.
7:30 P. M. Is Organic Unity of Protestantism Possible?
Summ'er Students Cordially Invited
NOTICE TO MEMBERS OF THE
MICHIGAN UNION
The Dining Room at the Michigan Union will be open during the
Summer Session. As Summer School students miss a large number of
their meals during the week and at week-ends, we recommend the use
of our coupon book system instead of paying regular board.
$5.50 IN COUPONS FOR $5.00

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