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August 05, 1919 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-05

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THE WOLVERINE

OMMUSOW,

NIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Summer

Session

1919

ore than 300 courses conducted by a staff
the regular faculties of the University.
facilities available

of 250 members
All University

Literature, Science, and the Arts, Engineering and
Architecture, Pharmacy, Graduate Study, Library
Methods, Biological Station, Embalming and Sani-
tary Science, Public Health Nursing, June 30-
August 22; Medicine and Surgery, June.30-August
8; Law, June p3-July 26 and July 28-August 30.
The work is equivalent In method, character and credit value to that
of the academic session, and may be counted toward degrees. All
classes of students, and especially those who desire to shorten their
period of residence at the University, or whose work was interrupted
or interfered with by the war, or associated activities, will find many
courses well adapted to their needs. Certificates of credit and attend-
ance issued. Many special lectures, recitals, concerts and excursions.
Cosmopolitan student body. Delightful location.

For further information, address
T. E. RANKIN

20

Ann Arbor, Michigan

a

DFFICIAL PRINTERS

to the

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

and by authority

OF ITS STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

THE ANNiARBOR PRESS

RUNNING DAY AND NIGHT
PRESS BUILDING, MAYNARD ST.
OUR WORK IS LIKE OUR PHONE

WILSON INSINCERE
IN TREATY STAN,
STATESSHERMAN
ILLINOIS SENATOR ACCUSES PRES-
IDENT OF INCON-
SISTENCY
FIUME AND SHANTUNG
MATTERS IN DISPUTE
League of Nations Boi ofrOutrage
and Spoilation Doomed from
Birth
Washington, Aug . 4. - Senator
Sherman, Republican, Illinois, in an
address in the senate today on the
peace treaty, charged President Wilson
with inconsistency in opposing Italy's
claims to Fiume while supporting Ja-
pan's claims to Shantung.
"A League of Nations born of re-
pudiation of Italy's claims and , the
spoiliation of China is cursed from
birth with an irredeemable outrage
on the right of two ancient and friend-
ly powers," said Mr. Sherman.
'IFiume is Italian in blood, in lan-
guage, and traditions. Italy is justi-
fied in asking to resume the natural
relations existing between Fiume and
the mother country.
"Shantung is given Japan pursuant
to a secret treaty. It was the pree
of Japan's permission to China to de-
clare war with the Allies. Japan's
sacrifices are unworthy of mention
with those of Italy. Her military forc-
es fought the German in Shantung to
seize the proceeds of Germany's rob-
bery of China.
Plunder Unjustified
"Neither international law nor the
new code of international morals bas-
ed on the treaties can justify the plun-
der of China. The League of Nations
and the peace treaty will be condemn-
ed by the impartial historian for the
sanction of this flagrant crime. Pres-
ident Wilson brands his denunciation
of the secret treaties with insincerity
when he refuses Fiume to Italy after
her heroic sacrifices and delivers Shan-
tung to Japan in obedience of studied
selfishness in the great war."
Jugo-Slaia Experiment
"The new Jugo Slav republic is an
experiment," the Illinois senator said.
"The attempt to fuse such a polyglot
people's characteristic of the indiffer-
ence exhibited in the League of Na-
tions for actual as against ideal con-
ditions. It is a magazine charged with
all the elements of explosion. By this
treaty we leave Jugo Slovia, another
Mexico on Italy's east-northeastern
front. Not by my vote will I so re-
quite our loyal associate for her faith
and sacrifice. Her unrequited facts
and service cry from the Paris con-
ference to American justice."
Statemeni' from Japan
Information reached Washington
today that a formal statement from
the Japanese government as to its in-
tentions regarding the final disposi-
tion of the Shantung peninsula will be
made public soon. The substance of
the statement has nothbeen, disclosed.
The Japanese statement, according
to available information is designed
to clear away all misunderstandings
and doubt as to the purposes of the
Japanese government. Beyond this
nothing with regard to the contents
of the statement could be learned
here.
PROHIBITION FORCES GRAPE
GROWERS INTO NEW TRADES

Washington, D. C., Aug. 4.-Forced
by prohibition to seek new fields,
many growers of wine grapes in Cali-
fornia have made inquiries in Mexico,
according to the state department.
The Mexican government was said to
have answered in a cordial manner.
According to reports from Mexico
City, the number of Americans is not
less than 70,000. Most of these are of
foreign extraction with the bulk Por-
tuguese.
ARSENAL, OF U. S. ARMY
THREATENED BY FIRE
Raritan, N. J., Aug. 4.-The United
States arsenal here was threatened
with destruction today by the explo-
sion of powder magazines. The
wrecked buildings caught fire. The
adjutant reported only six men had
been injured, none fatally.
SELL COTTON To KEREANY
FROM PT. WORTH MARKET
Fort Worth, Tex., Aug. 4.-A Fort
Worth cotton firm announced the sale
of 1,600 balespofcotton to Germany.
It will be shipped from Galveston.
Payment is guaranteed by three Ber-
lin banks.

August 11
5 p. m.-French Letters and the War,
Prof. A. G. Canfield.
August 12

August
5 p. m.-The Origin and Nature of
Color in Plants (Illustrated), Prof.
H. Kraemer.
8 p. m.-The Care of the Injured Sold-
ie with Special Reference to the
Blind and Deaf, Prof. W. R. Parker.
August 6
5 p. m.-The British General Election
of 1918, Prof. R. M. Wenley.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).
Augut 7
5 p. m.-Where Are We Coming Out in
Vocational Education? Prof. G. K.
Myer.

I

5 p. m.-The Duties of Sappers
War, Prof. A. H. Lovell.

WHAT'S GOING ON

in

8 p. m. - British National politics,
Prof. J. R. Hayden.
August 13
8 p. 'm.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
5 p. m.-The Political Situation in
Korea (Illustrated), Dr. W. C. Rufus.
Rufus.
August 14
5 p. m.-North Africa under Roman
Rule (Illustrated), Prof. J. G. Win-
ter.
8 p. m.-Miscellaneous readings. The
class in interpretative reading (Uni-
versity hall).
August 15
5 p. m.-:-The All Year School, Mr.
Paul C. Stetson, superintendent of
schools, Muskegon, Mich.
8 p. m.-How Fishes See, Hear, and
Learn (Illustrated), Prof. J. E.
Reighard. August 18
August 18
8 p. m.-Recital. The class in Shake-
spearean reading (University hall).
Old Slawe Dies, Leaving Fortune
Fayette, Mo., Aug. 4.-Jackson Hill,
an aged negro, former slave who died
lhere recently, left an estate valued
at more than $40,000. Hill was more
than 80 years of age, and was a slave
before the Civil war. He had never
been ouside Howard county, it is said.
Soon after the war he began to do
trucking anRi built up a large busi-
ress. He owned a very valuable
farm.
Dallas Barbers to Boost Priee of Shave
Dallas, Aug. 24.-Long, flowing
beards and shaggy locks that tumble
about one's sloulders are liable to be-
come popular in Dallas this fall. Rea-
son: Barbers are going to increase the
price of shaves Sept. 1 to 25c per
scrape. Haircuts will be 50c, and oth-
er services of the tonsorially inclined
jersons will be boosted accordingly.

THOMPSON DESCRIBES
CONDITIONS IN CHINA
ShO"WS TI HAT HIGHER STAIN I) ARI)
WILL . BRING GOOI)
RESULTS

8
8

p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
p. m.-Joyshow, under the Auspices
of the Michigan Union. Admission
will be charged. (hill auditorium.)

8

p.
of
E.

p. m.--Books and Manuscripts of
Fifteenth Century (Illustrated),
brarian W. W. Bishop.

the
Li-

August 8 .
m.-Glimpses in the Production
Munitions (Illustrated), Prof. A.
White.

Describing the conditions of Chin-
ese 'life Dr. C. E. Thompkins, of Fu-
chau, China, in his lecture "The
Yangtse Gorges and Beyond" showed
how by proper medical "are and by
living under proper standards the
Chinese could better their status of
existence. The death rate of the
Chinese was exceedingly large be-
cauiseof lack of suitable knowledge of
how to live, according to Dr. Thomp-
kins.
Ile showed pictures of Fuchau in
which city the houses were crowded
so closely together that there was just
room for a walk between them. Un-
der these conditions, when the tem-
perature is almost 100 degrees and the
humidity nearly makes the atmos-
phere steam, the Chinese children are
brought up with no place to play and
no opportunity to get out in the open.
Dr. Thompkins told of the results
which followed caring for a few of
these children in a kindergarten. The
normal intelligence was almost equal
to that of any other children when
they were raised according to the ac-
cepted methods of this country.
Ascent of the Yangtse
Introductory to this Dr. Thompkins
described the trip up the Yangtse
river t} Fuchau and illustrated the
journey with slides. Boats, towed by
as many as 40 cr 50 men, conduct the
traveler up the Yangtse river, which
is swift and runs through many
gorges. The journey in these primi-
tive boats takes as long as six weeks
going up, but the descent takes only
two weeks.
Occasionally a steam boat can be
taken, said Dr. Thompkins, but not
very often. The ascent by thq tow
boat is dangerous at times, for the
trip through the rapids often results
in the boat being overturned or
crashed on the rocks. Careful guid-
ance is necessary to avoid all mishaps.
Many Difficulties
Ile told of the many difficulties in-
volved in making the trip and showed
how the Chinese adapted themselves
to conditions to overcome the ob-
stacles. Dr. Thompkins showed pic-
tures of the Chinese villages, encount-
ered on the voyage, and described
how the inhabitants lived in movable
huts, so that when the river rose they
might leave for higher ground.
During the 'summer months the
Yangtse rises as much as 100 feet and
during this time the largest steam
boats often find difficulty in passing
the rapids, said Dr. Thompkins. Fol-
lowing his description of the ascent
up the Yangtse, Dr. Thompkins show-
ed views of the more inland terri-
tory.
CALIFORNIA GRADUATE SHOOTS
TWO MEMBERS OF FACULTY
Berkeley, Cal., Aug. 4. - J. H. Hil-
debrand and Edmund O'Neill, both
members of the University of Califor-
nia faculty, were shot and seriously
wounded today by Roger Sprague, a
graduate of the university, who alleg-
ed they had prevented him from ob-
taining a position.

TWO MORE -EXPERT RIFLEMEN
NEEDED ON UNIVERSITY TEAM
(Continued from Page One)
Chapman, 44; Fleischhauer, 41.5; Ken-
dall, 39; Sargent, 38.5; Klager, 37;
Van Demann, 36.5; Selling, 36; Doug-
las, 34; Eiding, 34; Guild, 33.5; Rub-
ley, 31; Dwyer, 30.5; Littlefield, 28.5;
Orr, 28.5; Kern, 27.5; Taylor, 27;
Neuman, 28.5; Starry, 24; Burton,
Goodale and Ilgenfritz, incomplete.
The team, when selected and train-
ed; wil go to Caldwell, New Jersey,
where about 40 Michigan men, still in
government service, assure them a reg
ular reception. To defray the ex-
penses of the extra men who will go
with the team an entrance fee of $1
is charged every candidate in the try-
outs. No scores will count until after
this entrance fee has been paid. To
avoid disqualification on these grounds
every man is asked to attend to the
matter promptly.
BRITISH HOLD NAVAL PAGEANT
COMNEMORATING MOBILIZATION
London, Aug. 4.-The important role
played by the British sea services dur-
ing the war was commemorated today
by a naval pageant on the Thames, the
day marking the fifth anniversary of
the mobilization of the fleet. Tower
bridge was the point selected for the
start of the five mile prbcession. .
As the procession moved along the
Thames the huge bank holiday crowds
which lined the embankments, swarm-
ed on the bridges and perched upon
railings and the roofs of houses and
in trees on both sides of the river, gave
a tumultuous greeting.
The progress of King George in the
royal barge was marked by particular
attention, the noise culminating as the
barge reached the Cadogan pier i4
Chelsea, opposite Battersea park,
where the king disembarked and was
received by the admiralty and civic
officials.
NAVAL LIEUTENANT ADMITS
GUILT IN $18,000 GRAFT
New York, Aug. 4.-The court mar-
tial appointed to try Lieut. Benoit J.
Ellert, U. S. N., accused of accepting
$18,000 in bribes to provide comfort-
able berths for young men of draft
age, seeking to escape service over-
seas during the war, today accepted
his plea of guilty to six specificatoins
of the 51 against him.
Those remaining were dropped upon
telegraphic instructions from Assis-
tant Secretary of the Navy Franklin
D. Roosevelt.
At least two more naval officers and
perhaps a dozen enlisted men will be
brought up on charges similar to
those made against Ellert, it is said.
GERMANS PLAN"TO BURN
TWENTY-FOUR BIG BALLOONS
Coblenz, Sunday, Aug. 3.-ByCour-
ier to Paris.-Germans in charge of
24 Zeppelins near Berlin have threat-
ened to burn them rather than deliver
them to the Allies as required by the
peace treaty, according to information
obtained by the American army auth-
orities here. The Zeppelins are about
25 tons capacity and can fly from Ber-
lin to San Francisco, according to
German sources. Several were built
to carry 40 persons.
Get your news first hand. Subscribe
for The Wolverine.

NO.1

i

Sportsmen-
Athletes -Everybody!

SUMMER SCHOOL

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