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July 31, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-31

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THE WOLVERINE

a b e tlo Ivertne
OFFICIAL STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrier or mail, $i.oo
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-244
flice Hours: Managing Editor-r:oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday; Business
Manager-- :oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday
Mark K. Ehbert.......................Managing Editor
Phone 244 or 2227-M
J. Ellsworth Robinson ................Business Manager
Phone 2414 or 1305
ser M. Campbell............City Editor Howard Weeks..............Column Editor
n Marx...........Associate Editor Chas. R. Osius Jr...........Directory Editor
Martha Guernsey............Women's Editor
Mark B. Covell...............Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr.....................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
F. G. Merz J. E: Beretta Robert W. Taylor
Samuel Lamport
BUSINESS STAFF
Schneider George H. Heideman Richard Lambrecht
William Wachs
THURSDAY, JULY 31, 1919
INTELLIGENCE FIRST
The popular demand for practicality in our educational endeavor is in-
tive of an honest effort to make our schools and colleges functibn
tively in a democracy. It cannot be doubted that there is need to adapt
educational practice to the changing social and industrial conditions,
it should be equally evident that what is needed is not revoluton but
justment. This means that the extremes of theory - on the one hand,
education should meet the test of practical efficiency; on the other
d, that education should primarily be concerned with mental culture -
t both give way to some form of education which shall represent a syn-
is of these two points of view. In this great democracy of ours there
id be educational advantage for all in the interest of alk, not in the
rest of the favored few or of special classes. Our problem is to dis-
mr what is best for the nation, not What the individual may prefer for
self.
A true democracy should recognize the necessity for providing equal
artunities for education and for providing the same basic education for
*ho are to assume the responsibilities of citizenship. Nor may bread
butter pursuits be neglected at any stage in education. The earning
i livelihood is of primary importance. But to prescribe the means
reby a boy or girl shall earn a living may readily impose a check upon
ative that augurs ill for the nation.as well as for the individual. Every-
' in a democracy is entitled to as abundant a living as the proper exer-
of his powers can command. But to train a boy to a mechanical
:ess before his faculties have awakened, and his capacity for choice
exhibited itself, may be to force him into an industrial trap. Every
should be helped to win for itself something more than the pay-check
ards. It should be made appreciative of all sorts of intangible values-
osity, imagination, sympathy, and judgment. This means that if the
1-worker is to be happy and effective as a citizen, he must bring to his
resources of thought and spirit, a knowledge of what constitutes good
k in his particular line and the urge of pride in its accomplishment, as
as practical skill. No man can be happy and contented without food
clothing and shelter; but also no one can be properly happy without
ligence. .
It is quite apparent, therefore, that vocational education must be ideal-
must be brought very largely into the realm of speculative theory,
as has been done with the various professional disciplines. A good law
vol, for example, does not teach its students solely how to apply useful
s to anticipated emergencies in court practice, a procedure which would
ce law to a mechanical trade. Rather, it presents law as a department
:nowledge, as a legal science, embodying man's conception of justice
of social obligation. The lawyer must study ideal justice, not merely
icular remedies. He must possess critical judgment based upon a broad
.dation of fact gathered from the history of man's struggle to establish
an rights and duties. In the light of these fundamental principles he
interpret the given case. Likewise must the education of the artisan
with the principles that underlie his craft. He must be trained to an
'eciation of its methods, so that he may be quick to discover possibili-
for improvement and be readily adaptable to changing. conditions, as
as intelligently occupied. Vocational training must be education in
king as well as in dexterity. So long, therefore, as vocational training
i to develop mere skill in the interest of speedy accomplishment, it
Lid never be given place in our present high schools, much less in our
ges. Fducation may be expanded to include much besides enlighten-
t, but it can never be compressed to include less, without disaster to our
ocracy.
What the world needs most.at present is clear, disinterested thinking.
ons and individuals are too commonly disposed to think in terms of
t and loss, to judge values in the light of selfish advantage. In the

ring of society there is too much of impulse and too little of judgment,
nuch-of passion and too little of reason. It is the business of enlightened
enship, and therefore of our schools and colleges, to know the facts,
then to interpret them critically. Education for the good of the nation
t represent constructive scholarship. And eadh successive stage in
'ational progress should lay increasing emphasis upon intellectual
nction. Those who lack the capacity for scholarship must be helped
illow the patterns of those more worthy of leadership, but the patterns
t not be reshaped to their limitations.' The primary business of a uni-
ity is intellectual conquest for social betterment. Anything that stands
he way of. this conquest is a menace to free institutions. Truth alone
steer a surescourse through the currents of conflicting self-interests.
lone remains steadfast amid the shifting values of life.
We cannot afford, therefore, to admit to our universities any narrow
tion without the attendant, ideal intellectual interest. No man need
ess of a philosopher for being a carpenter, but it does not follow that
>sophy should be abolished because more men are capable of carpentry
of philosophy. Let the manual interests be redeemed from drudgery
ugh critical analyses, but do not attempt to abolish drudgery by reducing
ctivities to the dead level of drudgery.
)ne of the obtrusive faults in our universities today is the dominance of
rade instinct. Students are thinking in terms of specialized interest,
as intelligent citizens. They are acquiring ready facilities rather than
cal Judgment; they are being instructed rather than educated. The
is in the air we breathe. Success means getting on in the world, rather
'the realization of one's best self. It is therefore not difficult to under-
L why so large a part of college life is devoted to non-academic inter-
th'e thousand and one social distractions that have no relation to
arship. These things have become vital because they furnish rewards
i slight effort and ability may win, whereas intellectual accomplish-'
requires devotion and disciplined powers. The remedy is not to sub-
;e a lesser for a worthier distinction, in the hope that greater numbers
attain it, but rather to remove as; many as possible of the obstacles that
nt the greater number from achieving the higlrst distinction. Instead,
fore, of forcing trades into the colleges, let the disinterested intelli-
iof the colleges be infused into the trades. - The Michigan Alumnus.

On the Other Hand-
"Jever notice," says our roommate,"
that women never look where they're
going or never go where they're look-
ing ?"
A bird in New York who weighs 680
pounds is in the hospital with paraly-
sis. Just think what a football team
he would have made if he had gone
to college.
A Couple ofEChoicerNames
Mr. and MVrs. Edgar Forsythe and
daughters, Adadell and Wiltruge spent
Sunday evening at Wampler's Lake.
-A. A. Times-News.
The Law is cussing over his work
and the Medic says, "Your profession
doesn't make angels out of men, does
it?" Law says, "No, we leave that to
you doctors. "
.Hurry Up or It Will Fall Apart
FOR SALE--Chalmers touring car,
mechanically good, new top. Be
snappy or this car will go quick.
-From the liners.
We heard a good one the other day.
Just try to say this at a moderate rate
of speed: The Leith police dismisseth
us. It doesn't look tricky but if you
can get it off successfully the first
couple of times you're pretty good.
Girls, Prepare to Migrate North
An ad in the Wisconsin Cardinal
says, "Everyman's on sale, 90c value,
reduced to $1.10.
New regiments are being recruited.
They are going to be composed en-
tirely of married men. Enough said,
but they should have met the Prussian
Guard about two years ago.
And Swinging Doors
A squirrel told us the oth.er day that
all the new soda fountains are being
equipped with family entrances.
Fond Mother: I hope that the young
man never kissed you by surprise?
Daughter: No, mother, he only
thinks he does.
-Penn. State Froth.
Pass the Tea, Girls
From the Wisconsin Cardinal we
clip the following part of the "Hello
Day" program:
Morning
7:30 to 12-Hello on the Hill. Sky-
rocket your profs. Get acquainted.
(Summer Session directories of the
students will be on sale at a reduced
price).
Afternoon
3:30 to 5:30-Water Carnival at the
foot of Park street. (Directed by
Swimming Coach Harry Hindman.)
5:00 to 6:00-Open House. Sororities
will be open to students. W alk
right in.
The latest thing is the toilet water
jag." Line forms at the right of the
barber chair.
A Jolly Bunch of Boys Will Be There
A state examination for embalmers
will be held in Lansing, August 19,
20 and 21.

GOVERNMENT CUTS
SCHOOL SPORT TAX
Washington, July 30. - America's
football fans will feel one less touch
of the high cost of sports, through a
recent ruling of the treasury depart-
ment. The ruling is that where the
money from a football game or other
form of collegiate sport is used exclu-
sively in educational work, the 10 per
cent war tax is exempted.
Educational work is interpreted to
mean the maintenance of an athletic
establishment and department of phys-
ical education and included in educa-
tion are musical programs given with
a desire to educate, and maintenance
of zoological parks for educational
purposes.
The interpretation was broad enough
to include high schools and colleges
where control of the moneys received
for athletic purposes is vested in fac-
ulty members. Schools where, indi-
viduals or organizations of students
or alumni have charge of the funds,
or receive a profit therefrom, must
continue to exact the tax from their
patrons.
TUESDAY LECTURE PICTURES
PRINCIPAL SPANISH CITIES
"A Ramble Through Spain," the lec-
ture delivered by Prof. H. A. Kenyon,
of the romance languages department,
Tuesday afternoon in Natural Science
auditorium, described the principal
cities of that country, and included
many slides illustrating the principal
points of interest in all of these cities.
Starting in the north of Spain, Pro-
fessor Kenyon took up successively in
his talk the cities of San Sebastian,
Burgos, Segovia, Madrid, Toledo, Cor-
dovan, Seville, Cadiz, and Grenada,
relating bits of history about each of
them.
PROF. BARTLETT DESCRIBES
SUMATRA ISLAND CUSTOMS
Considerable insight into the lives
of the natives of Sumatra Island wasI
furnished by Prof. H. H. Bartlett of
the botany department in his lecture
on "The Bataks' of Sumatra" yester-
day afternoon in Natural Science
auditorium.
Several slides accompanied the lec-
ture, showing the customs of the
Bataks. The naive beliefs of the
Batak tribes, as set forth in Professor
Bartlett's lecture, supplied much
amusement for the audience.
Read the Wolverine for Campus
News
Patronize our advertisers.
CORONA
v /L. C. Smith

For Your Recreation
We have to offer for your recreation
100 Tennis Rackets
Wright and Ditson's strong line also
the Lee Slotted Throat Racket
All Grades $2.00 to $11.00
Racket Restringing a Specialty
Wahr's University Bookstores
For Traveling. Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
com'e in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $'100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S, State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

Go to LYNDON'S

719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Eastman Kodaks,

Eastman Films

~1

GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
We have led in amateur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing:-Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
oping or no charge. We have the latest and best equipped store in the
State and our help is experienced in every line of Photography.
IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION BRING YOUR FILMS TO

Two Doors from
Hill Auditorium

LYNDON & COMPANY

71g North
University Avenue

1'- -- - -

-'I

LEAVE YOUR FILMS
AT
QUARRY'S DRUG STORE

FOR

THE SWAINS
TO DEVELOP AND PRINT

Remington
Underwood
Hammond and
other makes of typewriters
bought, sold, rented, exchanged,
cleaned, repaired.

Ill.

SCHAEBERLE & SON, Music House
110 SO. MAIN ST.
Complete line of High Grade Pianos, Player
Pianos, Victrolas, Victor Records
All String and Wind
Instruments

TYPEWRITING and
MIMEOGRAPHING
A Specialty

i

SEE US FOR YOUR MUSICAL WANTS

O. D. MORRIL L
17 NICKELS ARCADE

F Y

11

There is one bird
Who's bound to bore you.
He always says, "Is it
Hot enough for you?"

Subscribe for The Wolverine. $.751

DETROIT UNITED LINES

'/

l(

for the rest of the summer.

Chicago is a nice busy little town
now. With the exception of a few
race riots, a street car strike and a
new murder each day they have noth-
ing to worry about except the hot
weather.

BBathing Suits
WE HAVE THE TWO PIECE KIND WITH
THE WHITE BELT
GEO. J.-MOEq "Sport Shop"

Doesn't this squirrel
Give you a pain?
The one who always says,
"Again?"

Didja ever
Go to the Mai
When they had
These Literary
And have
A squarehead
Sit behind you
And
Read 'em all
Out loud?
Wow!

Digest witty comments

Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
1 (March 30, 19ig)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:10" a.
i., and hourly to S:xo p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express' Cars-7'48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (F,x-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-:oo a. m., 9:o5 a.
In. and every two hours to 9 :os p. In., 10:50
p. n. To Ypsilanti only, ii:45 p. m., 12:29
a. m., I :io a. m. and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6 :48 a. m. and
11 :20 p. in.
Absolutely..
The Coolest Piece in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOKE
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO. STATE
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbo[ Sav ings Dank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $530,000.00
j esurces..........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

Mid =Su mmer
Sale
All Light
Three-piece Suits

There's a new literary cult called
"Dadaism" that's just sprung up in
Switzerland. We opine that the baby
of the family named it.
"Three B or not three B, that is the
question," said the stude as he pur-
chased the new pipe.
H. W.
Read the Wolverine for Campus
News.

=4 Off

N. . ALLEN CO.
The House of Kuppeahelmner In Ann Arbor

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