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July 28, 1919 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L Y L 1\ 1 1 11 L

1in

[S IS THE END

OF ALL

PRiNG andSUMMER

STOCKS

This great SUMMER SALE is one of the few sales
>ld-but it has come to have a real meaning to the Women

Ann Arbor and the surrounding towns and country,

Be-

en Summer and Fall seasons, when new merchandise be-
to come in from New York, it becomes necessary to make
n, especially as we always have big, well-assorted Summer

on hand.

When we decide that these stocks must go-

drastic price-cutting-and splendid savings for you.

This Sale includes:

Silk Coats and Suits

Silk Dresses

Cloth Coats and Capes
Silk and Wool Skirts
Wash Dresses (entire stock)

Shirt Waists and

Smocks

Children's Dresses

Drama Enatedby
Class in Reading
"the Hunchback," a drama by
Knowles, was presented last night in
University Hall by the class in
Shakespearean reading. Theplay is
unusually pleasing and strong, being
well adapted for presentation without
extensive properties or scenic pre-
paration.
In introducing the actors Prof. T.
C. Trueblood, of the Oratorical de-
partment, explained that the assign-
ments to parts had been made without
regard to ability, quality of voice, or
personal adaptation for specific char-
acters. The play was produced as a
test of expression and thought as ap-
plied to the literature.
The test was an interesting one, the
actors being shifted from leading
parts to the humblest servants' roles,
and thus the versatility of the cast
was displayed. The sparkling wit of
the drama was particularly well
handled by those who enacted "Cousin
Moses" and "Helen." So, also, some
of the tragic moments were marked
with ease and finesse, for instance in
the final act, when the Hunchback
counsels Julia to keep her vow.
The cast as a while deserves much
credit in being able to throw atmos-
phere around their interpretation
without the usual mechanical devices
of the stage. The class includes Mis-
ses Busby, McPherson, Madery,
White and Parkes, and Messrs. Alt-
vater, Drinan, .Ducey, Laurie, Mc-
Kinney, Menchofer and Packard.
MICHIGAN KONOR ROLL
CONTINS 1177 NMES
(Continued from Page Three)
Lieut. Gordon Cooke died Jan. 10,
1918, at Ft. Bliss, El Paso, Tex.; Sergt.
Jeffry Doran died Feb. 12, 1919, at
Giebres, France, of pneumonia fol-
lowing an attack of influenza; Capt.
Richard Fischer died October 31,
1919, at Asheville, N. C., of tubercu-
losis; Corp. William Hodges died Feb.
21, 1919, at Camp Custer of pneumo-
nia; Reuben Lawson died of disease
Sept. 14, 1918, at ' Morbain, Tex.;
George Loveridge died of disease Oct.
22, 1918, at Camp McClellan, Ala
Lieut. Andrew McQuillan was killed
Oct. 25, 1919, near Valenciennes while
aiding the wounded; Capt. Frederick
Munsum died of pneumonia following
an attack of influenza while stationed
at Plattsburg, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1918;
James Owens died Oct. 15, 1918, of
influenza and penumonia at Ft. Oma-
ha, Neb.; Hugh Payne was killed while
on scout duty in France on Sept. 26,
1918; Robert Preiskel died March 26,
1919, of disease at Base Hospital at
St. Nazaire, France; Marcus Ruppe
was killed in action at Bois de Oimont,
France, by the bursting of a shell Oct.
12, 1918.
James Sage, a runner who refused
promotion, who was recommended for
bravery at Verdun, the Marne, was
killed in action at Juvigny by the ex-
plosion of a large shell. Major Victor
Vaughan, who was awarded the dis-
tinguished service medal for merito-
rious and conspicuous service was
drowned at St. Aignan, France, on
June 4, 1919; Corp. Leroy Weber died
Oct. 7, 1918, at Camp Sherman, 0., of
pneumonia; Harold Whitney died Feb.
24, 1919, of bronchial pneumonia at
Le Main, France; Lieut. Burns Ly-
van, of Alexandria Bay, N. Y., was
killed in action Oct. 3, 1918; Lieut.
Samuel Henderson, Halstead, Minn.,
died of pneumonia at Camp Greenleaf,
Ga., Oct. 19, 1918; Lieut. Vivian Mous-

er, Big Stone Gap, Va., died of pneumo-
nia developing from a gas wound Jan.
7, 1919; Lieut. William Edwards died
in service June 3, 1919, at U. S. Hos-
pital 36.
Subscribe for The Wolverine. $.75
for the rest of the summer.

Removes Cage-like
Improves Appearance of

I

Appearance-Use Your Present Curtains
Ford Car 100%. Adds 10% to Sale Value.
PLATTE SALES CO.

The Pennypacker Top Converter converts the Ford top into a snappy, stream-
line forty-five-dollar value One-Man Top for only $8.50.
Your Top and Our Converter Makes the One-Man Top

Can Be
Installed In,
Less Than
One Hour.
No Chiange In
Your Curtain
Connections.
Makes Driving
Safer.

HENRY

s .

316 E. Huron St.

Ann Arbor, Mich

V,

rur r

____ _

t

Music Notes

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Hosiery, Collars, Etc.
And many other articles that you will want.

dp-

U
*1~

DFFICIAL PRINTERS

I

A One-Man Top for S .0
-- Back
THE Not
TODSatisfied

I

to the

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

The following program will be of-
fered at this week's concert given
Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock in
Hill auditorium, when Miss lone A.
Wilber, soprano, of Charlotte, and Mr.
Frank A. Taber, organist, of Grand
Ledge, will appear. The general pub-
lic is cordially invited.
Sonata, No. 1 .............. Borowski
Allegro; Andante; Finale
Frank A. Taber
Menuet de Martini ........Weckerlin
Se Florindo e fedele.......Scarlatti
Primavera ................ Tirindelli
Ione A. Wilber
Andante religioso ............Wilson
Intermezzo.................Wilson
Scherzo .................. Hoffmann
Mr. Taber
The Jasmine Door ............. Scott
Remembrance ............... Salter
I Love and the World is Mine.Manney
Miss Wilber
Caprice (The Brook).......Dethier
Mr. Taber
Burton A. Garlinghouse, Accompanist.
CONSTRUCTION PROGRESSING
ON NEW CAMPUS SIDEWALKS
Construction work on campus walks
is progressing rapidly. Two, con-
necting the Natural Science building
with University hall, have been com-
pleted. A portion of the diagonal is
being relaid from the Natural Science
building to the Economics building
and part of this is finished.
The walks which will connect the
mall with the library are also being
laid and a section of one is already
complete. Material is being placed
on the ground near the library, pre-
paratory to building the new diagonal
from the Alumni Memorial hall to the
gymnasium.
LAW SCHOOL ENROLLMENT
REACHES TOTAL OF 210
Enrollment in the Law school has
now reached the number of 210 which
is within five of the largest enroll-
ment and which is 450 per cent great-
er than that of last year. Additional
students have entered the second
term of the Law Summer session
which began Monday and which will
continue for five weeks.
Examinations were held in the,
evenings of the last week end, at
which time members of the Law
school completed their work at the
University.
Oscar Hammerstein Close to Death
New York, July 28.-Oscar Ham-
merstein, iroducer of grand opera, is
gravely ill of a complication of
diseases in a hospital here, it was
learned tonight. He suffered a sim-
lar attack a year and a half ago.

Literature, Science, and the Arts, Engineering and
Architecture, Pharmacy, Graduate Study, Library
Methods, Biological Station, Embalming and Sani-
tary Science, Public Health Nursing, June 30-
August 22; Medicine and Surgery, June 30-August
8; Law, June 23-July 26 and July 28-August 30.
The work is equivalent in method, character and credit value to that
of the academic session, and may be counted toward degrees. All
classes of students, and especially those who desire to shorten their
period of residence at the University, or whose work was interrupted
or interfered with by the war, or associated activities, will find many
courses well adapted to their needs. Certificates of credit and attend-
ance issued. Many special lectures, recitals, concerts and excursions.
Cosmopolitan student body. Delightful location.

Summer

Session

More. than 300 courses conducted by a staff
of the regular faculties of the University.
facilities available

For further information, address
T. E. ,RANKIN

of 250 members
All University

1919

Box 20

Ann Arbor, Michigan

and by authority

pq

OF ITS STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
'HE ANNARBOR PRESS
RUNNING DAY AND NIGHT
PRESS BUILDING, MAYNARD ST.
OUR WORK IS LIKE OUR PHONE

WHAT'S GOING ON
July 29
5 p. m.-A Ramble through Spain (Il-
lustrated), Prof. H. A. Kenyon.1
8 p. m.-Some Phases of War Sur-
gery, Dr. J. F. Breakey.
July 30
5 p. m.-The Bataks of Sumatra (Il-
lustrated), Prof. H. H. Bartlett.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).
July 31
5 p. m.-The Effect of the War on Sec-
ondary Schools, Prof. C. O. Davis.
8 p. m.--Educational motion pictures.
August 1
5 p. m-Ancient Athletic Sports and
Festivals (Illustrated), Prof. A. R.
Crittenden.
8 p. m.-Reading-Barrie's The Will,
Mr. L. Eich (University hall),. .
August -2
5:30 a. m.-Excursion to Put-in-Bay,
Lake Erie, under the direction of
Prof. I. D Scott, via Michigan Cen-

pendant et apres la Guerre (in
French), Prof. Hugo P.GThieme.
8 p. m.-The Yangtse Gorges and Be-
yond (illustrated), Dr. C. E. Thomp-
kins, of Fuchau, China.
August 5
5 p. m.-The Origin and Nature of
Color in Plants (Illustrated), Prof.
H. Kraemer.
8 p. m.-The Care of the Injured Sold-
le with Special Reference to the
Blind and Deaf, Prof. W. R. Parker.
August 6
5 p. m.-The British General Election
of 1918, Prof. R. M. Wenley.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).
Augut 7
5 p. m.-Where Are We Coming Out in
Vocational Education? Prof. G. E.
Myer.
Bill Would Combine U. S. Air Services
Washington, July 28.-A bill pro-
posing creation of a department of
aeronautics, which would co-ordin-
ate the army, navy, marine corps and
postoffice air -services, was introduced
today by Representative Curry, Re-

NO. 1

-v

SUMMER SCHOOL

tudent DIrectory

tral railroad to Detroit
to Put-in-Bay.
August 4
5 p. m-La France et

and steamer publican, of California. The measure
also would provide government as-
sistance in the development of aero-
l'Amerique planes for commercial purposes.

ON SALE

Patrvoize our advertisers.

FOR TENNIS RACQUETS, TENNIS BALLS, BASE BALLS, FINGER,
MITS, AND KODAK SUPPLIES.

35c

TRY US--WE ARE THE ONLY
STUDENTS' SUPPLY STORE

"s Bookstore
ian & Compa

'Prt Uhlttrint
OFFICE

Slater's Bookstore
Students' Supply Store

y

1111 S. University Ave,

Phone 1160-R

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