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July 28, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-28

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THE WOLVERINE

14

Ioiverine

OFFICIAL, STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday afternoons
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second-class matter
Subscription by carrieror mail, $x.00
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street
Phones: Business-96o; Editorial-2414
Office Hours: Managing Editor--1:00 to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday; Business
Manager-i.:oo to 2:oo o'clock daily except Saturday
Mark K. Ehlbert......................Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 2227-M
J. Ellsworth Robinson.................Business Manager
Phone 2414 or x o,
Chesser M. Campbell............City Editor Howard Weeks...............Column Editor
Milton Marx.............Associate Editor Chas. R. Osius Jr...........Directory Editor
Martha Guernsey............Women's Editor
Mark B. Covell...............Assistant Business Manager
Thornton W. Sargent Jr...,..................Issue Editor
REPORTERS
F. G. Merz J. E. Beretta Robert W. Taylor
Samuel Lamport
BUSINESS STAFF
C. P. Schneider George H. Heideman Richard Lambrecht
William Wachs
TUESDAY, JULY 28, 1919
LET'S START SOMETHINO-
In the face of the intense heat, nearly all suggestions advocating physi-
cal action should be accompanied by apologies. , We, therefore, beg to make
our excuses before launching upon the subject - that concerning summer
social activities.
During the regular term there iare a number of gatherings and social
affairs which bring the students into closer contact with one another and
conduee to a broader University spirit. This influence, however, is nota-
bly lacking during the Summer session, at which time it is needed most
because of the so -varied character of the student body. In summer the
students go their separate ways and pay no regard to the dictates of Mich-
igan's democratic spirit.
What is needed during the Summer term to unify the student body and
to make of it a more homogeneousiand co-operative group are All-campus
mixers, interciass athletics, and other affairs of similar type. The tennis
tournament is in progress, but it 'has a very limited influence in promoting
acquaintanceships. Let's have some informal gatherings open to the entire
campus.

Let's start something.

On the Other Hand-
A friend of ours after hearing one of
the w. k. 17 year old locusts buzzing
merrily inthe trees said, "Gosh, they
sure do breathe hard through their
noses."
The Busy Arm of the Law in Saline
Things have been happening with
considerable regularity of late with
Deputy Sheriff Cook. Last Thursday
afternoon he snared a few booze run-
ners, Sunday- night he was called
from his downy couch to take care of
a couple of auto thieves who had
been towed into town but who escap-
ed without their car while Mr. Cook
was trying to get in telephone com-
munication with the sheriff's office. At
an early hour Monday morning, to
offset the loss of the thieves, he bag-
ged a few more rum runners. We
haven't seen him since noon and he
may have snared a few more since.
Anyway, this is a pretty good sort of
territory for law violators to shun,
even if one or two do get away once
in a while.-Saline Observer.
Didja
Ever wake up
Xbout 2 o'clock in the morning
And hear thunder
And wind
And see lightning
And lie awake
And wait for the rain
So you could get up
And put the windows
Down
And lie awake
And lie awake
For about two hours
More
And then
The ?*!?! @'&- storm
Blows over
And doesn't rain
Atall?
He Has to Find the barn Thing in
the Dark
Fred Richards has a new Chevrolet
automobile and also has a new acety-
line lights in his barn.
-Saline Observer.
If you ever want to hear something
that has no parallel in the world just
come down to the Wolverine office be-
tween 2 and 4 any day. Some people
say that a Ford in reverse makes the
strangest noise there is, but it is
nothing compared to the School of
Music soprano who warbles at that
time. We think she is training to be
a huckster or to demonstrate some
new gargle but others insist that she
is going to announce t;-ains in a few
years. Anyway she is unique and
quite a curiosity to bring your friends
down to hear.
We'll Give 2 to r that Mrs. Eccles'
Daughter Got Married
FOR SALE-A devenport, mahogany
frame, upholstered in green tapes-
try. For particulars inquire of
Mary J. Eccles.
-Saline Observer.
ANGRY SOLDIER THROWS
INKWELL AT PREMIER
-Headline.
The pen in this case seems to be
mightier than the sword.
The Sultan of Turkey, in a recent
statement said that he regretted that
Turkey entered the war. He also
said that he thought that the peace
terms were severe. This isn't bad for
the- Sultan seeing that the war has
been over now for about eight months.

The old boy certainly has a keen in-
sight into political events or he could-
n't gettoffysuch a deep one on the
peace treaty.
A headline says,, "Pastors of Eng-
land Find Ties in America." We al-
ways thought that the English clergy
wore their collars backwards and had
no use at all for the cravat.
Jever notice that there are two
heads that you can always bank on
finding in any good sized daily? We
leave the blanks for you to fill in.

LEGION RECOMMENDED
LIEUT. COI,. LU7CAS ASKS ST-
DENTS T BECOME MEMIIERS
OF LACAL POST
Editor, The Wolverine:-
I am taking the liberty of writing
to you to ask you to bring to the at-
tention of those students who served
in the forces of the United States in
the recent World War the fact that a
post of the American Legion has been
organized in Ann Arbor and to strong-
ly recommend their joining the or-
ganization.
The American Legion is the organ
ization of America veterans o the
World war. It is non-parisan and
non-political. It is not a military or-
ganization and it makes no distinc-
tion between those wno were fortun-
ace enough to serve overseas and
those who were not. Its object is, to
quote the constitution, "To uphold
and defend the Constitution of the
United States of America: To main-
tain law and order, to foster and per-
petuate a 100 per cent Americanism;
to preserve the memories and inci-
dents of our association in the Great
war; to inculcate a sense of indi-
vidual obligation to the community.
state, and nation; to combat the au-
tocracy of both the classes and the
masses; to make right the master of
might; to promote peace and good
will on earth; to safeguard and trans-
mit to posterity the principles of jus-
tice, freedom and democracy; to con-
secrate and sanctify our comradeship
by our devotion to mutual heluful-
ness."
Anyone is eligible to membership
who servedhonorably as a member of
the army, navy or marine corps. be--
tween April 6, 1917, and Nov. 11, 1918.
No conscientious objectors need ap--
ply.
The Legion was first organized in
Paris, March 15 to 17, 1919, by 1,000
officers and men, delegates from all;
units of the A. E. F. This meeting
adopted a tentative constitution and
selected the name "American Legion."
The action of the Paris meeting
was confirmed and indorsed by a simi-
lar meeting held in St. Louis, May 8
to 10, 1919, when the Legion was for-
mally recognized by the troops who
served in the United States and a
constitution- was adopted.
The object of the Legion is as stat-
ed above. Its power will be exerted
to influence, in the form of sugges-
tions, the various legislative bodies
of the country and there is no doubt
about the power exerted by some
4,000,000 men and women, properly
organized, being effective.
It is the duty, therefore, of every
person, who did take an active part
in the war, to do all in his power to
see that the influence exerted by this
organization is along proper lines for
the good of the country and the only
way in which you can do this is to
join.
There is no definite statement made
that former members of the S. A. T.
(Continued on Page Three)
Wesbrook, '21, Defeated in Singles
Cleveland, July 28.--Walter Wes-
brook, '21, captain of the University
of Michigan tennis team, was defeated
in straight sets by Robert Kinsey in
the Tri-state sectional tennis tourna-
ment held here last week.
Get your news first hand. Subscribe
for The Wolverine.

Wahr's University Bookstores
For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US,
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade!

Go to LYNDON'S
Eastman Kodaks

719 N. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Eastman Films

GUARANTEED AMATEUR FINISHING
ENLARGEMENTS FROM YOUR NEGATIVES A SPECIALTY
We have led in amateur finishing for twelve years and are still lead-
ing :-Why? Because we give you QUALITY. We guarantee our devel-
oping or no charge. We have the latest and best equipped store in /the
State and our help is experienced in every line of Photography.
IF YOU WANT SATISFACTION BRiNG YOUR FILMS TO
'wo Doors from L A (, CflMP V 7=gNorth
Hill Auditorium ~ "-~ ~ ~J'Ih~ University Avenue

For Your Recreation
We have to offer for your recreation
100 Tennis Rackets
Wright and Ditson's strong line also
the Lee Slotted Throat Racket
All Grades $2.00 to $11.00

Racket Restringing a Specialty

HUMANIZING EDUCATION
Very genmly does Sir William Osler suggest to the members of the Ox-
ford Classical association that what their cult of the humanities needs chiefly
is to be humanized. No man ever praised the Greeks more devoutly. "The
name of Hellas stands no longer for the name of a race, but as the name
of knowledge; or, as more tersely put by Maine, 'Except the blind forces of
Nature, nothing moves in this world that is not Greek in origin.'" Yet,
though President of the Classical association, it is as a scientist that he
speaks to these humanists as Regius Professor of Medicine; and he thrusts
his charge home with masterly skill. To them the humanities mean only
history, literature, and philosophy; -to the Greeks ,science was of equal im-
portance. And in its relation to the humanities the science of the Greeks
has a very special meaning for the world of today.
What Osler says of "Greats," the world-famous School of Literae Hu-
maniores, is doubly true of classical instruction in America. "The moving
forces which have made the modern world are simply ignored. Yet they
are all Hellenic, all part and parcel of the Humanities in the true sense, and
all of prime importance in modern education." To the student in Greats,
Aristotle is known as author of the "Metaphysics," "Politics," and "Poet-
ics," but not as a scientist. Yet, as was pointed out to Darwin and admitted
by him, "the principle of natural selection" was shadowed forth by Aristo-
tie. "In biology," says Osler, "Aristotle speaks- for the first time the lan-
guage of modern science, and indeed he seems to have been first and foremost
a biologist; his natural history studies influenced profoundly his soci-
ology, his psychology, and his philosophy." This "founder of modern bi-
ology" studied scientifically "the problems of heredity, of sex, of nutrition,
of growth, of adaptation, and of the struggle for existence." Though en-
cyclopaedic in his interests, he was a specialist in embryology unrivaled for
two thousand years. His discovery of a "a special mode -of reproduction
in one of the species of sharks" waited until the nineteenth century to be
confirmed. Yet Osler searched, the examination papers of the school of
Literae Humaniores through the past decade and found no reference to
Aristotle as a scientist. Other cases are almost -as striking. Lucretius had
views of "the origin of the world and the origin of mhan" which are up to
date with the most modern thought; and his conception of "continuity in the
workings of Nature" are "unmatched among the ancients or moderns:"
yet the fact is similarly ignored in 'the school of Literae Humaniores. The
inevitable result is a failure to grasp what is fundamental in history and
philosophy, man's relation to the primal forces of humanity and to the uni-
verse.
There is another side to the picture, the professed scientist. "The ex-
traordinary development of modern science may be her undoing. Special-
ism, now a necessity, has fragmented the specialties themselves. The
worker loses all sense of proportion in a maze of minutiae. Applying them-
selves early to research, young men get into backwaters, far from the main
stream. They quickly become hypercritical, and the smaller the field the
greater the tendency to. megalocephaly. From over-specialization, scien-
tific men are in a more parlous state than are the Humanists from neglect
of classical tradition. The salvation of science lies in a recognition of a
new philosophy - the scientia scentiarum which Plata describes: 'Now,
when all these studies reach the point of intercommunion and connection
with one another, and come to be considered in their mutual affinities, then
I think, and not till then, will the pursuit of them have value.' " Osler
accordingly proposes a modified Honor School in which the principles of
philosophy are to be dealt with in relation to the sciences, and in which
science is to be illumined by the introduction of literary and historical stud-
ies. "Science will take a totally different .position in this country when
the knowledge of its advances is the possession of all educated men."
Many minds are today moving toward a similar conception of the truly
cultural education. As a satirist of modern classicism pointed out, the
Greeks had not the slightest suspicion that they were Ancients. In each
passing century those who hnderstand them best think of them most nearly
as they thought of themselves when they walked and talked on the Acropolis.'
To us of today they are most modern when we follow their tentative ob-
servations in science, their inspired guesses as to the moving forces in this
world machine, and eke them out with our fuller correlation of facts, our
ever enlarging and solidifying theories as to man and his place in nature.-
The New York Times.

If--

.

I 'Eff

LEAVE YOUR FILMS
AT
QUARRY'S DRUG STORE
FOR
.THE SWAINS
TO DEVELOP AND PRINT

r
SCHAEBERLE & SON, Music House
110 SO. MAIN ST*
Complete line of High Grade Pianos, Player
Pianos, Victrolas, Victor Records
All String and Wind
Instruments
SEE US FOR YOUR MUSICAL WANTS

Subscribe for The Wolverine. $.75
'for the rest of the summer.

B a t h i n g Suits
WE HAVE THE TWO PIECE KIND WITH
THE WHITE BELT
GEO. J. MOE "Sport Shop"

. DETROIT UNITED LINES-
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--8:io a.
in., and hourly to 8: ro p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. n.' (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-( T :a. in., 9,:oa.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p.in., 10:50
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 P. m., r :2e
a. m., r :xo a. m., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
11r:2o p. in.
The Coolest Place in Town
Air Changed Once a Minute
ICE CREAM and HOME
MADE CANDIES
The Sugar Bowl
Phone 967 109 SO. STATE
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The AnolArbor Savingfs Dan'k
Incorporated 1869
Capital and.,Surplus, $650,000.00
Resources........$4,O000,0.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

"GET $....,000 IN BOLD
DAYLIGHT HOLD-UP"

". ..KILLED,....HURT
IN AIRPLANE CRASH"
Gosh!
A. C Donnelly has purchased a new
Ford sedan-a crytal palace on
wheels-a steamboat pilot-house with
rubber tired wings.
-Abington Argus.
Over at the University of Wisconsin
they are having a "Hello Day." Every-
body speaks to everybody else on the
street. The question is, what good is
it if it doesn't last until the next day
or at least to that night over the
phone? H. W.

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