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June 26, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WOLVERINE

AT THE ThEATERS

That University of Michigan stu-
dents may represent the state at the
.ational rifle matches to be held at
Caldwell, N, J. in August appears pos-
ible.
Of six riflemen who have competed
at the state rifle range south of the
ity for places on the state rifle team,
ve are students. In the order of
ighest scores made, these men are:
H. D. Vogt, '21E, D. Kaufman, J. D.
Lowry, '20E, G. R. Strimbeck, Jr., '22E,
and R. C. Vogt, '22E:
Prof. C. E. Wilson, of the mechani-
al engineering department, however,
anked higher than' any, of these men
n the tryouts, with a score of 310 out
f 350. He is expected to place in the
matches together with Vogt, Kaufman,
and Lowry, all of whose shooting was
99 or better. About 35 rifle clubs in
[ichigan are competing for places on
he state rifle team.
M AJ E S TIC
MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA Hightly-A11 Shows Sunday
June 25-26-Elsie Ferguson in "Under
the Greenwood Tree." "His Feathered
Nest," Sennet Comedy.
June 27-28-Ethel Clayton in "Maggie
Pepper." "The Chauffeur," Billy West
Comedy. .
June 29-30-July 1-William S. Hart in
"Breed of Mlen."
July 2-House rented to the "Grotto."
Not open to the public.
~July 3-4-5--"Auction of Souls."
ARCADE
Shows at 3:0 7:00; 8:30
Phones:
Theatre, 296-M Mgr's Res, 23x6-M
Thu-Fri--26-27--Norma Talmadge in
"The New Moon"; Christie Comedy
and Ford Weekly. 2SC,
rat-28-Er my Wehlen in "The Ama-
teur Adventuress" and Big-V Com-
edy, "Mules and Mortgages."
Sun-M~on-2.-o-Owen Moore in "The
Crimson Gardenia" by Rex Beach;
eatzeniammer Kids Cartoon and
I$ruce Scenic.
ORPHEUM THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
Thurs-Fri-20-27-A Paramount Special,
"Little Women" with a News and Com-
cdy,
Sat-28-Dorothy Dalton in "Quicksands"
with a News and Comedy.
Sun-Mon-29-30-Kitty Gordon in "The
Unveiling Hand" with a Mutt & Jeff
Cartoon, "Sweet Papa" and Ford
Weekly.

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Majestic - Elsie Ferguson in'
"Under the Greenwood Tree."
Arcade - Norma Talmadge in
"The New Moon."
Wuerth-"Her Code of Honor."
Orpheum - A Paramount Spe-
cial, "Little Women."

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AT THE ARCADE
A thrilling story, a beautiful and
talented star, a splendid cast, excel-
lent direction and some wonderful
photography - all go to make up Nor-
ma Talmadge's latest Select picture,
"The New Moon," which will be pre-
sented at the Arcade today and to-
morrow.
"The New Moon' is the story of a
Russian princess, Marie Pavlovna,
who flees to a neighboring province
when her castle is attacked by anarch-
ists, and takes refuge in a small store
in the guise of a peasant girl. When
the decree is issued, ordering all the
women in the country to register in
order to be nationalized, the princess
refuses to register and incites the
other women of the town to follow her
example. The authorities discover the
true lineage of the peasanlt girl who
is leading the women to revolt and
try to force her to register, with dire
results to themselves. I
Norma Talmadge, famous for her
versatility, gives an excellent charac-
terization of the Russian peasant girl
who was truly a princess.
Wolverine delivered at your door
three times a week at $1.00 per term.
1

VICTORY ADRESES
(Continued from Page One)
liberty against autocracy and the
ideals which led the soldiers onward.
Victory Won by Coopeation
Brigadier-General Spaulding, a
Spanish war veteran who has been
promoted rapidly in the army, spoke
next on America's Dart in the war.
In describing the limitations prevent-
ing America from claiming major re-
sponsibility for Victory, he said in
part:
"The danger to Paris last year was
more psychological than military, for
the French had not, been beaten al-
though the morale of the people was
low. The road to Paris was open and
the Germans were marching down it,
Uctwen two lines of unbeaten French
soldiers, but the end was unblocked.
We plugged the hole. It is probable
that the French could have stopped
the' Germans without this help.
"In the great offensives of the Meuse
and Argonne, we did not win it all
alone, for French soldiers were with
us and American soldiers were with
the French troops. Co-operation won
the day.
Not the Last War
"The war was won because of many
things and in spite of many. When
certain ones of these are eliminated,
then a doctrine of war will be culti-
vated and America will be ready for
another war, for this is not the last
one.
"We did do much, however, toward
winning the war. The number of
Americans -who went overseas did
turn the scale and make possible an
offensive. The spirit which an Amer
ican always had on the offensive made
such possible, for the Allies had lost
that spirit."
Closer Bond
Professor Talamon, who served
with the French army from 1914 until
his affiliation with the American
headquarters staff in 1917, told of his
desires, from the first of the war, that
America should enter the conflict. le
urged that a closer bond be establish-
ed between the united States and
France.
Mr. Sharp, the late ambassador to
France, emphasized, in the last ad-
dress of the afternoon, the fact that
the combined efforts of all were
necessary to the winning of the war.
He described conditions in Paris dur-
ing the bombardments by the long-
range gun and spoke of talks with
General Pershing and Marshall Joifre.
c c highest tributes, he said, had bean
paid to the Americans for their part
in the world war.
Ypsilanti Grads Planning Dormitory
Ypsilanti, Mich., June 25-Alumni
of Ypsilanti Normal college are plan-
ning to erect a girls' dormitory here,
to be known as Kings Hall, in mem-
ory of Julia Ann King, for many years
a teacher in the school:~
Wolverine delivered at your door
three times a week at $1.00 per term.

YOUR GREATEST SUCCESS
IS ABILITY-TO SERVE
-JUDGE THOMPSON
"Your greatest success is your abil-
ity to serve people." In this sentence
is expressed the keynote of the ad-
dress delivered by Judge Thompson,
of the Supreme Court of New York,
to the graduating class of the Law
school at their Class day exercises
held on Monday, June 23.
Judge Thompson was the principal
speaker of the afternoon. His talk
was based upon his own experiences
while serving on the bench and before
the bar.
Judge Thompson began his speech
by reminding the audience that what
he would say would not remain with
them for any appreciable length of
time. Otherwise, he said, the honor
conferred on him would be too much
of a responsibility, for his talk was
to be only of a suggestive nature.
Success Meais Service
His main suggestion manifested it-
self under the caption of "success."
Synonymous to him with success, he
said, was the word "service." He ap-
pealed to the graduating class first of
all to be human, saying that a gre'at
many of the present day cases re-
quired good common sense and an in-
terest in human beings, rather than
a scintillating brilliancy in tie law.
Humane Interest Needed
"Service and an humane interest in
one's fellow beings go hand in hand,"
Judge Thompson stated. "The big-
gBest men today are not those who sit
in the courts and render decisions of
law, but those obscure little men who
rarely reach the court room, but who
settLe cases vital to individuals. Those
men really serve. Those men are suc-
cessful. To those men comes abund-
ant remuneration. And to such ideals
should one aspire."
Thorolf G. Evensen was chairman
of the exercises. Edwin D. Dickinson
and Abraham J. Gornetzky were un-
able to appear as scheduled. Oscar
P. Lambert gave the class oration and
also was substituted in the place of
the absent valedictorian.
ALUMNAE FROM '89 TO- '19
ENTERTAINED AT MARTHA COOK
With alumnae from classes as far
back as '89 and representing every
part of the United States, together
with the women of this year's gradu-
ating class, Martha Cook building's ca-
pacious dining room and halls scarce-
ly accommodated its great number of-
guests at the annual Alumnae lunch-
eon given there Tuesday noon. Dean
Jordan and Miss Greenwood received
the guests, while various members of
the Collegiate Alumnae association
presided at the serving tables.
The business meeting which follow-
ed the luncheon was devoted mainly
toward the raising of money for the
Alumnae house debt of $8,000. In an
enthusiastic response, more than
$3,000 was pledged by the members and
guests present at the meeting Tues-
day afternoon.

A RCAD

Today and Tomorrow
NORMA TALMADGE
THE QUEEN OF VERSATILITY

- in-

"THE NEW MOON"

~SEET PICTUES

A story ofA
the fight of its
their inherent
liberty.

Russia a
women
right

The bid moon I oo
down on a scene, of mis
and despair, but "the r
moon" saw happiness
love.

Also

CHRISTIE COMED
and FORD WEEKL

SATURDAY

EMMY WEHLEN in

"THE AMATEUR ADVENTURESS"

TRY, OUR

NOON-DAY
Specials

TUTTLE'S

A "Classy" Comedy built around the adventures of a stenog
rapher in quest of wealth and a glimpse of life.
SUNDAY AND MONDAY
OWEN MOORE and HEDDA NOVA in
Rex Beach's "THE CRIMSON GARDENIA~
"A rattling good melodrama, located in New Orleans, with
the Mardi Gras in progress."-The Billboard.
GRUEN WATCHES
SILVERWARE CUT GLASS
LEA THER GOODS
ALARM CLOCKS FOUNTAIN PEN
FINE JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIRING
H A L L E R - FV L L E R

LUNCH
ROOM

WUERTH THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
burs-Fr-26-27-Florence Reed in
"Her Code of Honor" with an L-Ko
Comedf, "FRISKY LIONS AND WICK-
ED HUSBANDS."
at-28-William Desmond in "Mints of
Hell" with a News and Comedy.
un-Mon-29-30 - William Russell in
"Some Liar" with a Sunshine Comedy,
"Lady Bell Hop's Secret."

Right across from
Nickels Arcade

STATE STREET JEWELERS

-III

. Todasy -
2:00-3:30-7:00-8:30

1
1
1. Y

non #

ELSIE FERGVSON in

"Under

the

reenwood

Tree"

"HIS FEATHERED NEST"

Triangle Comedy

T@MORROW -- SATURDAY
"MAGGIE

Ethel Clayton in

PEPPER"

"THE CHAVFFEUR"

Selected Comedy

SUNDAY

3 DAYS

COMING

Wm. S. Hart in eBreed of Men"

ee4tiOn.

of

So'uls"

LAGE SMITHY"

Sennett Comedy

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