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July 26, 1919 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OLVERINE

a I.

......._

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Ssh! Here 's a 1Wit of
Interesting Gossip for
Summer School Women!
Often women who come here for the summer session
discover that they haven't quite as many cool summer frocks
as they'd like. Or perhaps it is a crisp blouse or a fresh tub
skirt that is lacking.
Of course you can always buy good looking apparel in a
city of this character, but here's where the interesting gossip
comes in! We are selling OUR tub frocks, skirts, and blouses
at reductions that will almost take your breath away !

They simply must be cleared to make room f
so this is the method we've taken of doing it:
$6.50 to $8.50 voile and gingham dresses. ... .
$10.00 voile and gingham dresses.......... .
$15.00 voile and gingham dresses...........
$17.50 to $25.00 voile and gingham dresses..
$5.00 white and colored crepe de chine waists..
$3.50 colored organdie waists.............
$4.95 colored organdie and voile waists.,...
$3.95 white tub skirts............. ... ..
$5.00 and $5.95 white tub skirts ...........

or fall stock,
.....$3.98
..... $5.50
.....$6.95
... .$10.75
. ... . $3.95
.....$1.98
.....$2.19

.$2.95
.....$3.75

PEOPLE GIVE UTMOST
FOR SCHOOLS' UPKEEP
(Continued from Page One)
He said further that it was not only
the duty to furnish an education, but
that, if necessary, part of the people
should receive this compulsorily, be-
cause they would not be able to ob-
tain it except by compulsion. "Com-
pulsory education as far as many of
the rural schools is concerned is a
myth," declared Dr. Chadsey.
Yale President's Statement
He told of a statement by the pres-
ident of Yale universi y, who said
tuition should be charged in high
schools. This was a doctrine of re-
action, according to Dr. Chadsey.
"Education must be made available
not only , to the young," stated Dr.
Chadsey, "but also to the old in the
form of high schools.
"All needs for education will be
supplied if in the future educationists
turn their attention to obtaining their
money in a manner which will not
necessitateyconfiscatory taxes," said
Dr. Chadsey. "In the cities educa-
tion is closely linked up with taxa-
tion, and the s'hools can not go on
without taxes. If taxes become so
high that it is cheaper for the people
to let the land go, why then the taxes
will cease and so will the schools."
He said that if the money could not
all be obtained by state aid that the
Federal government should helpwith
money. He showed that a tremend-
ous increase in teachers' pay was
necessary to avoid a tremendous de-
crease in the efficiency of the teach-
ing force. "People remain out of the
teaching profession because of being
unable to live on such a small wage.
If the scale of pay is raised then in-
creased efficiency will result," con-
cluded Dr. Chadsey.
In his evening lecture, "The Super-
intendent, the Board, and the Teach-
ers," Dr. Chadsey told how the super-
intendent, which position is rather
new, was hampered in obtaining the
best results in his administration of
the schools by the school board, which
was constantly assuming authority
which ethically should not belong to
them.
Members of the board often take
responsibility when by right they do
not have it, because the authority is
vested in the board when it is in ses-
sion.
He likened the board and the super-
intendent to the manager and direc-
tors of a corporation. He said that a
manager of a corporation would de-
vise the method of running the busi-
ness, and that the directors would
merely pass on it. "Yet," said Dr.
Chadsey, "the school board often goes
into the business part of the educa-
tion themselves and transacts mat-
ters concerning the teachers, books,
and courses of study, of which they
know little, thinking that the super-
intendent who has studied the propo-
sition all his life and who has asked
the opinion of others, is wrong on the
matter."
Ideal School Board
Dr. Chadsey showed that the ideal
school board would be one which
would enable the superintendent to
initiate all matters concerning the
schools,' and which would leave the
school board to pass upon the mat-
ter. He said that, if the school board
could not trust the superintendent to
do this satisfactorily, it was time it
got some one whom it could trust.,
The superintendent's position should

be guaranteed him by state laws, ac-
cording to Dr. Chadsey.
Supedintendent's Position
He showed how the superintendent
should be one of the most important
men in the community as to him was
entrusted one of the greatest prob-
lems, that of educating the children.
In this work he said that close co-

THE "Y" INN

Lunch-i 1:45, 12:45 ......................40 cents
Dinner-5:30, 6:30........................50 cents
LUNCH AND DINNER, per week, $5.25

-:-0

Service Table d'Hofe

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Summer

Session

1919

More than 300 courses conducted by a staf of 250 members
of the regular faculties of the University. All University
facilities available
Literature, Science, and the Arts, Engineering and
Architecture, Pharmacy, Graduate Study, Library
Methods, Biological Station, Embalming and Sani-
tary Science, Public Health Nursing, June 30-
August 22; Medicine and Surgery, June 30-August
8; Law, June 23-July 26 and July 28-August 30.
The work is equivalent in method, character and credit value to that
of the academic session, and may be counted toward degrees. All
classes of students, and especially those who desire to shorten their
period of residence at the University, or whose work was interrupted
or interfered with by the war, or associated activities, will find many
courses well adapted to their needs. Certificates of credit and attend-
ance issued. Many special lectures, recitals, concerts and excursions:
Cosmopolitan student body. Delightful location.

at Lane Hall

GOOD HOME COOKED FOOD

(Second Floor)

For further information, address
T. E. RANKIN

Ilk

I i

Ai.k46

Box 20

Ann Arbor, Michigan

a 'rrrYirata

- - - - - -

OEFICIAL PRINTERS

to the

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

and by authority

OF ITS STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
....H ANNARBOR DRESS
RUNNING DAY AND NIGHT
PRESS BUILDING, MAYNARD ST.
OUR WORK IS LIKE OUR PHONE

RESERVATIONS TO
BE CONSIDERED
(Continued from Page One)
strengthen her own position in the far
east.
Not to Present Treaty
President Wilson does not now plan
to present the defensive treaty with
France to the senate until after he
returns from his tour of the coun-
try. This statement was made today
at the White House.
When the president presents the
treaty he will accompany it with an
explanatory address to the senate. No
statement was made at the White
House with regard to charges in the
senate yesterday that the president
had violated a section of the treaty
by not presenting it simultaneously
with the treaty of Versailles.
Any reservations in the senate rati-
fication of the peace treaty would re-
open the whole field of negotiation,
encourage other nations to make res-
ervations and renew international dis-
sension, declared Senator Pittman,
Nevada, a Democratic member of the
foreign relations committee, in an ad-
dress today in the senate.
The sepaker cited the Spanish
treaty of 1819, to which the senate
*.attached a reservation as to papal
claims in Florida, and said that al-
though the Spanish government at-
tached the same reservation, the
treaty had to be ratified a second time
because the two stipulations were
dierently worded. He pointed out
that the supreme court later had held
this reservation to be a "part of the
treaty," and that the same court had
held of the treaty with Spain that
"in its essence it is a contract."
DEVEuEUX PLAYERS WILL
PRESENT TWO DRAMAS TODAY
(Continued from Page One)
company, is well known for her work
with the company for the past sev-
eral seasons, while Mr. Leslie Austin,
who plays opposite her, is known both
on the legitimate stage, and in the
moving pictures, where he has played
in support of Pauline Frederick.
Tickets may be obtained this morn-
ing at Wahr's, and this afternoon and
evening at the box office in University
hall.

You will find cool drinks
and luncheons at
709 N. University

I

1'. _ .

operation was necessary between the
teacher and the superintendent if the
best results were to be attained.
"A school system worth while will
be established when all realize the
power and importance of the superin-
tendent, and I believe this is possible,"

concluded Dr. Chadsey.
Immediately following the lecture
Dr. Chadsey was the guest of honor
at an informal reception of the. Edu-
cation club, at the Acacia house, the
summer headquarters of the organi-
zation.

NO. I

GRUEN WATCHES
VER WARE CUT GLASS
" LEA THER GOODS
IM CLOCKS FOUNTAIN PENS
FINE JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIRING
ALLER ( FULLER

SUMMER SCHOOL

Student rctr

STATE STREET JEWELERS

ON

SALE

)ERLAND ENTERTAINS
is OF WOMEN'S LEAGUE
of the Women's .league
tained Thursday afternoon
ie of Mrs. E. R. Sunder-

N. H. Williams, G. O. Davis, R. W.
Cowden, R. W. Aigler, and Max Wink-
ler, and Miss F. B. Gillette.
Mrs. C. O. Davis will entertain the'
members of' the league and their
friends from 3 to 6 o'clock Thursday
at-her home at 1030 Martin Place.
Get your news first hand. Subseribe.
for The Wolverine.

*

35c
OFFICE,

nt sang, accompan-
.e Elliot, and Mr.
)laved a violin solo.

Wahr's Bookstore
Sheehan & Company

Slater's Bookstore
Students' Supply Store

,

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