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July 24, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-24

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THREE TIES
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VOL. X. No. 13 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 24, 1919 PRICE THREE C

TAFT SUGGESTS
'iNTERHPRETATIONS
OF LEAGUE PLAN
Would Save Treaty from Defeat by
Means of Mediation Between
Parties
RAPS PRESIDENT FOR
ERRORS IN COVENANT

NOTED EDUCATOR
TO SPEAK FRIDAY
"The School and the Community"
will be the subject of Dr. C. E.
Chadsey's lecture to be given at 5
o'clock Friday afternoon in the Nat-
ural Science auditorium.
At 8 o'clock he will talk on "The
Superintendent, the Board, and the
Teacher."
Dr. Charlsey, who is superintendent
of schools at Chicago, was secured for
these lectures with'some difficulty by
the officials of the Summer session.
As one of the foremost educators in
the country, he is in demand as a
speaker.
In commenting on the Chicago man
Dean Kraus of the Summer session
said, "Dr. Chadsey comes with first
hand knowledge of his subject, and his
discussion of the topics is such that
any one will be interested in them. He
does not speak for the school teacher
alone,"
FILM STAR TO.APPEAR
WITH DEVEREUX TROUPE
'LAYS OF SHERIDAN AND SHAKES-
PE ARE CONSTITUTE PROGRAM
FOR SATURDAY

Thisqualifications To Eliminate
Conteitants in Tennis Tournament

Partisanship
As

Unless quite a number of matches
scheduled to be played off in the first
round of the 1919 Summer school ten-
nis tournament are played this after-
noon, it appears that disqualifications
rather than defeat will be the main
factor in the eliminatin of players.
Reports show that just about nine
matches in the singles have been com-
pleted, approximately 22 matches hav-
ing been scheduled. This is the last
day for elimination matches in the.
first round and those failing to appear
when scheduled will be automatically
barred from further play.
Second round play in the doubles
must be completed by Saturday night.
Number 1 plays No. 2; No. 10 plays
No. 11, etc.
Play in the second round was be-
gun yesterday, one match being played
in the singles and one in the doubles.
In the first round of the doubles Mer-I
kel and Munz beat Norris and Moul-
throp, the victors taking on Landis and
Hart for the second round when the:
latter team drew a bye. Merkel and

Tactics of 'Wilson Cited
Cause of Most
Trouble

Munz were successful also in this
match.
It is desirable that the contestants
report the results of their matches toj
Dr. May or (eorge Moe the same day
on which the match was played, so
that the plans for the second and third
rounds may be completed.
The results of the first round are as
follows:
Huber-Spiesberger ........6-3; 13-11
Angell-Hert .................6-2; 6-1
Shartel-France ............6-1; 6-0
Hatch-Beers ...............6-2; 6-1
Merkel-Bassett ..........6-8; 6-2; 7-5
Bowers-Lewey .... .........6-1; 6-0
Landis beat Gilmore.
Worth beat Parsons.
Second Round
Sanchez-Crockett ........ ..8-6; 8-6
DOUBLES
First Round
Merkel and Munz-Norris and Moul-
throp ................6-0; 8-10; 6-1
Second Round
Merkel and Munz-Landis and Hart
.6-3; 6-2

Washington, July 23.-Former Pres-
ident William H. Taft has suggested
to republican leaders a plan of "in-
terpretations" to the League of Na-
tions covenant to unite on a middle
ground enough Republican and Dem-
ocratic senators to insure ratification
of the treaty.
Letters to the Republicans written.
by the former president and made
public here tonight sharply criticize
,President Wilson's policies in the
peace negotiations. Mr. Taft stated
that the president's apparent desire
to form a new world policy and ob-
tain credit for it, together with his
partisan tactics, created a situation
in which any plan he might propose
would be vigorously opposed.
A prograi of interpretations to be
included in senate ratification of the
peace treaty in order to insure sup-
port of the Republicans favorable to
a league idea is suggested in let-
ters from former President Taft to
Will H. Hayes, Republican national
chairman, copies of which are in the
hands of some of the Republican sen-
ators.
The letters suggest six "interpreta-
tions" covering the right of with-
drawal, limiting the representation of
dominions and colonies, asserting the
prerogative of congress to declare
war under Article 10, confirming na-
tional control over domestic issues,1
defining the Monroe doctrine, and re-
serving 'the right to terminate obli-
gations under Article 10 at the end
of 10 years.
Mr. Taft wrote that these interpre-
tations would not weaken the cove-
nant but would, he believed, assure
ratification. He suggested that he
should not appear publicly at this.
time as their sponsor, because it
might bias some Republicans against
them.
1

i

NATURE OF CEMETERIES
MUCH MISUNDERSTOODi

I

WHAT'S GOING ON

When the Devereux players appear
in University Hall Saturday for their
two performances, the leading male
role will be played by Leslie Austin,
a well known eastern actor. When
announcement was first made that Mr.
Devereux himself would not appear
with his company, as in previous years,
it was not known who would appear
as the male star. But arrangements
with Mr. Austin were concluded, and
he now plays opposite Zinita Graf,
who has been leading lady for the
Devereux players for several seasons.
Leslie Austin has appeared on the
stage in New York in many promi-
nent roles, but never left that city
until he joined the Devereux forces.
He is well known to the moving pic-
ture public, as he has been leading
man for Pauline Frederick in all of
her latest productions.
Miss Gilf a "Find"
Zinita Graf, who will be seen as
Juliet and as Lady Teazle, started'
her stage career in the not unusual
role of substitute for a sick actress.
When the Devereux company was in
a little Texan town, a college town
too, as it happened, the sudden ill-
ness of the principal feminine player
caused Mr. Devereux to scurry through
the city to find a substitute.
Miss Graf was at that time teach-
ing school, and had given readings
and dramatic recitations in various
entertainments. Being approached
by Mr. Devereux, she agreed to try
out for the part in the play to be
given that evening. It developed that
she knew the lines perfectly, and
needed hardly any rehearsing. Her
initial stage performance proved such
a "hit" with the audience, that she
was induced, soon after, to join the
company.
Since that time she has easily tak-
en rank among the distinguished play-
ers who have appeared in Shakes-
pearean and other classic plays. The
two roles that she will offer in Ann
Arbor, Lady Teazle, in "The School
for Scandal," and Juliet in "Romeo
and Juliet," are said to be among her
best.
Tickets on Sae
Tickets for the two performances
are now on sale at Wahr's, and will
continue to be sold tomorrow and
Saturday.
YELLOW FEVER SCARE CLOSES
PORTS TO PERUVIAN VESSELS
Guayaquil, Ecuador, July 23.-Be-
cause of reports of yellow fever prev-
alent in Northern Peru, the Ecuador-
ian board of health has closed all the
ports of Ecuador to vessels arriving
from northern Peruvian ports. A dis-
patch from Guayiquil, July 21, report-
ed an outbreak of yellow fever in the
province of Piru, northern Peru.

PROF. TEALDI EXPLAINS DEVEL-
OPMENT OF LANDSCAPE
CEMETERIES
"The nature of cemeteries is largely
misunderstood," said Prof. A. Tealdi
in his illustrated lecture, "The Land-
scape Cemetery, an American Crea-
tion," given at 5 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon in the Natural Science aud-
itorium.
"They are thought to be ghostly,"
he continued, "but in reality they have
developed into one of the most beau-
tiful creations of man. They orig-
inated with rural or lawn cemeteries,
and have since that time changed into
the modern cemeteries.
Landscape Gardening
"It was only two centuries ago that
landscape gardening came into vogue,
and cemeteries were not touched by
this until a century ago. A monk in
France placed monuments over the
bodies which were buried in his gar-
den about 1800. Nothing resulted from
this in Europe, and it was left to
America to begin the landscape ceme-
tery plan in 1831, when the Mt. Al-
bon cemetery near Boston was laid
out in the new design.
Cincinnati Cemetery
"Soon after this the first real land-
scape cemetery was built in Cincin-
nati, and named the Springrove cem-
etery. Since that time many more
have been laid out, and in all new
additions to old cemeteries have been
effected by this new influence."
Professor Tealdi told of the diffi-
culties in finding the right locations
for cemeteries, for land neither too
rich nor too barren will make an ideal
landscape cemetery. He likened the
cemetery to the real estate business,
saying "'people will pay more for a
beautiful lot in which their bodies will
be placed, than for the land on which
they will live."
The lecture was illustrated by views
of various landscape cemeteries, show-
ing how the scenic effect was brought
about.
WASHINGTON COAT OF ARMS
FOUND IN GREAT BRITAIN
London, July 23.-The Washington
family coat of arms has been discover-
ed in the east window of the parish
church at Windermere, Westmoreland.
The armorial bearings are those of
George Washington, first president of
the United States. The Washington
family originally came from North
Lancashire, and the east window
came from Cartmel Priory in the same
county. The coat of arms contains
three stars and four stripes, the lat-
ter alternating red and white.

THOMPSON LAUDS WORK
OF PROFESSOR YIBBERT
STUDENT TELLS OF ASSOCIATIONS
WITH MAN HONORED BY
FRANCE
Prof. Charles B. Vibbert who was
recently awarded the Cross of the Le-
gion of Honor in France, did service
of great consequence both for Ameri-
can soldiers in France and for the,
University of Michigan as well, accord-
ing to Leland Thompson, ex-'18, who
has returned to the University after
having served in France.
As Michigan's representative in the
American University Union, Professor
Vibbert did efficient work in promot-
ing the acquaintance of French people
with. American students in the army.
Gathering Place
The Union, situated on Richelieu
street, Paris, formed a gathering place
for all university men whether or not
their own particular university had
a representative. Friends of the men
were also admitted. The building be-
fore the war had been a hotel, but un-
der the direction of the University
Union it made an attractive and mod-
erate-priced resort for men coming to
Paris on leave. A certain number of
rooms were available, but the essential
mission of the Union was to act as a
"mixer," and to acquaint university
men with the best families in Paris.
Further Associations
Thompson, who was a lieutenant in
the United States army ambulance
service, formerly of The Michigan
Daily staff and a member of the first
Michigan Ambulance Unit, tells further
of his associations with the Union. At
one time Dr. Vibbert took a group of
them-fresh from the front-to a musi-
cale given by a Madame Lerch at her
home near the Champs Elysee. Ma-
dame Lerch was herself a pianist and
a member -of a musical family. She
had a pre-arranged program for the
American guests - piano, violin and
vocal - with refreshments follow-
ing. The music, the foreign hospi-
tality and the charm of a French in-
terior were pleasant relaxations to
men who had but seven-days' leave
once in every four months from fir-I
ing-line duty.
"Tommy" visited the Union when-j
ever he came to Paris and met other
Michigan men there, John B. Parker,
'17, managing editor of The Daily in
1916-17, and Erwin 'Johnson, '16, also
of The Daily staff. He speaks highly
of Dr. Vibbert, who was an especially
successful entertainer and knew many
French people.,

PROSPECTS BRIGHT
FOR FALL SESSION
Prospects for a large enrollment in
the literary college next fall are un-
usually bright, if a letter just received
from Registrar Arthur G. Hall may
be taken as a criterion. An excerpt
from the letter follows:
"We are enjoying our vacation here
in Les Cheneux Islands. Incidentally
I am as usual taking care of the ad-
mission of freshmen to the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts. I
have admitted 162 freshmen to that
college thus far, which augurs well
for a large enrollment in the fall."
The letter is posted from Coryell,
Mich., where the registrar and his
family are spending the summer
months.
NURSES NEED HIGHER,
BRHOAD ERHEDUCTION
PROF. DORA BARNES DESCRIBES
ADVANTAGES OF SUPERIOR
TRAINING]
"Nuses in the future should be
women of a high type, with at least a
high school education; and better with
a college education embracing the study
of foreign languages, economics, soci-I
ology, chemistry, physics, and biology,"
said Prof. Dora M. Barnes in her lec-
ture, "Why the Public Should Be In-
terested in the Education of Nures,",
at 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in the,
Natural Science auditorium.
"The appreciation of a skilledt
nurse's ability is shown by the fact
that, the Metropolitan Life Insurance
company employs skilled visiting nurs-
es to, visit industrial policy holders.
The company, which cannot expend
money except as an investment, esti-
mated from this extensioni of service
that indemnity claims had been re-
duced 12.8 per cent. This was accom-
plished by nurses being present at the
home of the sick policy holder only
part of the time each day.
Profiteering by Uneducated
"Educated nurses not only give bet-
ter service but it has been shown
that during the recent influenza epi-
demic all profiteering by nurses was
done by those who were not skilled
and who had not been educated high-t
ly. They had not had time to absorb
that professional conscience which1
causes one to work for the sake of
duty."
Professor Barnes continued: "Somet
doctors think that nurses should nott
be educated. I think that a nurse
has to know the business of the doc-
tor, just as the doctor has to knowt
about a nurse's work. I often liken1
them to an architect and the build-
er, each one being indispensable to
the other and each one having to know
something of the other's work.
40,000 Nurses Needed
'To do any good it would be neces-,
sary to have 50,000 public health nurs-
es, or one to every 2,000 persons. The
private nurse should be done away
with as being a nuisance. Most of the
sick people need a nurse's attention
only one hour a day, and the remain-
der of the time could be spent with,
other sick ones. Nurses should be dis-
tributed according to physical need
rather than financial ability, and the
system of visiting nurses is acknowl-
edged to' be the best plan to bring
this about.
"It would be necessary to get many
more girls of a high type to enter the
nursing profession if this great num-

ber of nurses is to ever be reached.".
Professor Barnes then showed that
many girls would not become nurses
because of the hardships accompany-
ing work of this kind. She showed that
an eight-hour day was productive of
better work, and that many of the
other bad conditions could be easily
remedied.
Professor Barnes concluded, "If
conditions are bad, they are worth
while changing."

REDS PLN FLIGHT
ASBOSHEISM'S
FALL APPROACH
PETROGRAD LEADERS PREPARE
FOR IMMEDIATE DEPARTURE
TO MOSCOW
FOOD SITUATION WORSI
INCREASE OF SUIC ID E
Communication Re-established wi
American Military
Column
Washington, July 23:-Imminen
of the passing out of bolshevism
Russia is indicated in information r
ceived today by the state departme'
from Swedish sources. Nine speci
trains are awaiting it is said, for t]
flight to Moscow- of the Petrogri
red leaders, who are now mak
hasty preparations for their depa
ture.
Conditions are becoming more cri
ical in Petrograd. The food stuatk
has reached a crux, with bread sellir
for $1.30 a pound, Suicides are c
the increase and German intrigue
rampant.
Vladivostok, July 11.-Communica
tion was re-established today wi
the American military column in ii
Suchan district after more than o
week's interruption. The America
troops which had been clearing on
the bands of bolsheviki in the Suci
valley, suffered two men killed a
11 wounded during a week's skirmis
ing.
News from the American detac]
ments came when the Americ
cruiser Albanyand the British cruis
Carlisle, convoying supplies eter4+
American Bay, 60 miles southeasti
here, and found that the Americs
troops had reached there after the
trip, down the valley.
London, July 22.-A bolshevist del
gation has arrived at Kishineff wil
an offer of peace to the command
of the Rumanian Dniester troops 0
behalf of Nikolai Lenine, the bolsh
vist premier, according to a Berl:
government wireless dispatch.
Lenine offers to cede Bassarabia
Rumania on condition that Ruman
shall prohibit Ukrainian citizens at
bands of Admiral Kolchak, head
the all-Russian government at Oms
from crossing the Rumanian frontle
An armistice to last eight days ha
been concluded on the BassarablW
front and the delegation has gose
Rumanian headquarters.
RESERVATIONS BEING MADE
FOR PUT-IN-BAY EXCURSTO
Students and others desiring to g
on the excursion to Put-in-Bay Au
2 are requested to consult as ear
as possible with Prof. I. D. Scott 0
Mr. F. W. Frostic, room 440 Natur
Science building. Reservations a:
now being made.
As the trip takes only a day, and
consequently inexpensive, compared
the Niagara trip, it is expected th
an unusually large number will tal
aivantage of the excursion. Profess
Scott will personally ponduct t
party.
The excursionists will leave at 5:
o'clock the morning of Aug. 2 for D

troit via the Michigan Central ra
road, and from Detroit a steamer w
be taken to Put-in-Bay. The 'par
will return to Ann Arbor the sat
evening.
LORD LYTTON MAY BE BRITISH
AMBASSADOR TO WASHINGT(
London, July 23.-It is reported
American diplomatic circles that Lo
Lytton is the most likely- choice of t
British government for .the post
ambassador to Washington.
Reserved Seats
75 Cents

July 24
5 p. m.-The Manufacture of Beet
Sugar (Illustrated), Prof. W. L. Bad-
ger.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
July 25
5 p. m.-The Schools and the Com-
munity, and
8 p. 'm;-The Superintendent, the
Board, and the Teacher, Dr. C. E.
Chadsey, of Chicago.
July 26
3:30 p. m. - Sheridan's "School for
Scandal."
8 p.. m.-Shakespeare's "Romeo and
Juliet." The Devereux company with
Zinita Graf. Admission will be.
charged. (University hall).
July 28
5 p. m.-Indutrial Democracy, Prof.
R. W. Sellars.
8 p. m.-Recital. The class in Shake-
spearean reading (University hall).
July 29
5 p. m.-A Ramble through Spain (Il-
lustrated), Prof. H. A. Kenyon.
8 p. m.-Some Phases of War Sur-
gery, Dr. J. F. Breakey.
July 0
5 p. m.--The Bataks of Sumatra (Il-
lustrated), Prof. H. H. Bartlett. *,
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-j
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).

At 3:50-Sheridan's
":THESCHOOL FOR
.SCANDAL"

THE

DEVEREUX

COMPANY

University Hall, Saturday,
July 26

e's

SEAT SALE AT
Opens Wednesday
Thereafter Daily: 9 A.M. to 5

i

mm"m

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