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July 22, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-22

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARMER

YI

Uinlurr

._,r_.

AT YOUR DOOF
THREE TIMES
A WEEK

VOL. X. No. 12 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 22, 1919 PRICE THREE CE

CARANZ A TROOPS
TOFREE BORDER
OF OUTLAW BANDS
MEXICAN GOVERNMENT MAKES
PREPARATIONS TO REMOVE
MENACE
TEXAS ASKS PROTECTION
IN NOTE TO CONGRESS
Calls Attention to Outrages of Long
Standing; Seeks Liberty of f
Action ,
Galveston, Texas, July 21. - The
Carranza government is preparing
to assert full control in the oil re-
gions and reduce the power of un-
attached bandit groups by sending
5,000 infantry, one or. more battal-
ions -of machine guns, 12 to 15
aeroplanes and five batteries of field
artillery into the Tampico field, ac-
cording to announcement here today
by Meade Fierro, the Mexican consul.

Engineers Seek
Entry Into 400
Members of the engineering college
are fast emerging from their uncouth
chrysalises and gaining entrance into
the hitherto forbidden circles of the
400. Aristocratic aspirations have at
last come into the experiences of the
boilermakers, who are now endeavor-
ing to impart an elite touch to their
names if not to themselves.
The preceding conclusions have been
reached after the compiling of the
Summer scool directory. Here it
was found that, of all the schools on
the campus, the engineering college
contained the greatest number of men
writing their signatures with the in-
itial of the first name and the middle
name spelled out-a practice called,
in the vernacular of the engineering
quadrangle, "cracking the name in.
the center."
It was also noticed that the great-
est number of illegible directory cards
were those of students enrolled inthe
Graduate school. The legibility rec-
ord, on the other hand, belongs to the
engineers, most of whom print their'
cards so that their highly ornamental
appellations may the better be dis-
played.,
FALLING DIRIGIBLE
KILLS 10 IN CHICAGO
BLAZING WRECKAGE CRASHES
THROUGH SKYLIGHT OF
BANK BUILDING

TENNIS TOURNAMENT TO OPEN TODAY;
88 ENTRIES FOR SINGLES AND DOUBLES

Play in the 1919 Summer school*
tennis tournament will start this af-
ternoon in both the singles and dou-
bles. A record number of entries was
turned in for this year's summer
championships, 54 men being listed in
the singles and 17 teams of two men
each in the doubles.'
The 1919 entry list far outnumbers
that of any previous year and some
fine competition is expected. First
and second prizes in both singles and
doubles will be awarded, all of the
awards consisting of various articles
of tennis equipment.
The winner of the singles cham-
pionship will receive one dozen tennis
balls. The runner-up will receive a
racquet cover and press. The dou-
bles winners will each receive rac-
quet covers and presses.
Thursday Night Limit
All first round matches in the
singles must be played off by Thurs-
day night of this week, and the re-
sults of the matches reported to Dr.
May at Waterman gymnasium, or to
George Moe's athletic shop, 711 North
University avenue. Men drawing byes
for the first round may play their
second round matches any day this
week. The complete schedule for the
second round of singles will be pub-
lished in Saturday's Wolverine.
All first and second round matches
in the doubles must be played before
PLY TICKETS' TO GO
ON SALE_ WEDNESDAY
DEVEREUX ACTORS TO GIVE TWO
PERFORMANCES ON
SATURDAY

Saturday night of this week and the
results reported to Dr. May or George
Moe. The schedule for the third round
of doubles will be published in next
Tuesday's issue of The Wolverine.
Must Report Results
The result of every match must be
reported or it will not be counted. The
telephone numbers of all contestants
have been published in order that op-
ponents may arrange for their match-
es withoutbdelay. All matches must
be played by the time set. Contest-
ants will umpire their own matches
until the semi-finals are reached.
Preliminary round matches will be for
the best two out of three sets.
The drawings in both singles and
doubles championships follow:
First-Round Drawings for Singles
The four following men drew byes
and must play in the second round:
1-Ducey, 868-J; 2-Fullaway, 357.
3-Breakey, 1304; 4-Shambaugh, 120.
The following man drew bye and
must play winner of 6 and 7 in sec-
ond round:

'Spotlight lMen
Hold Rehearsal
Members of the cast that will pre-
sent the Summer Spotlight vaudeville,
August 7, in Hill auditorium, gathered
in the old Union building last night
for the first rehearsal. Songs were
given out, and the plan of the min-
strel show, which will take up the
first part of the program, explained.
Nearly all of the men present have
taken part in regular session produc-
tions, and little difficulty is expected
in getting 'them in shape for a first
class performance. The presence of
the experienced talent also gives the
Summer session students who have
not been here during the winter an
opportunity to see what a real Union
show is like.
The next rehearsal will be held
Wednesday night, at which time it is
expected some real work can be done.
The menu present last night were ask-
ed to have the words of the songs-
memorized so as to be able to start
on them Wednesday night.
The songs are all new hits that E.
Mortimer Shuter, who is directing the
show, has brought from New York
especially for the Union show.
CHELSEA BOY DROWNQED
SWIMMING IN HURON

Austin, Tex., July 21.-Without de-
hate the Texas senate today adopted,
a concurrent resolution calling the at-
tention of the president and congress
to the "guerilla warfare that has pre-
vailed along the Texas-Mexican bor-
der since 1875," and asking the fed-
eral government if it cannot protect
its border to "accord to Texas that
liberty of action" in protecting its
ctzens.that the republic of Texas en-
joyed« prior to the time that it "in
good faith became a state of the
Union."
To Take Necessary Steps
The object to be attained through
such "liberty of action," according to
the resolution, is that Texas as a
state may take such steps as may be
necessary for the protection of its bor-
der.
The resolution recites border inci-
dents since 1875, which have been
"intensified during the last nine
years," during which period citizens
of Texas "have been murdered, their
property stolen or destroyed,, and the
people of this state made to suffer
the outrages of guerilla warfare." Citi-
zens of New Mexico and 'Arizona have
suffered similar outrages, according to
the resolution, which concludes as fol-
loww:

5--Tracey, 556.
The following
round:

men play in the firstI

Resolution
"We call attention to the fact that
the condition of affairs which has
obtained in Texas since its anexa-
tion more than 70 years ago (1845)
is no longer to be endured, and that
the point has been reached when the
government of the United States owes
Texas and its citizens the same de-
gree of protection to their lives, their
property and their purposes as is
enjoyed by citizens of other states of
the Union, or that, if the government
of the United States is incapable of
doing this, it ought to accord to Texas
that liberty of action with reference to
the protection of its citizens it enjoy-
ed * * before it became a state.
of the Union."
Y. M. C. A. SEEKS OLD CLOTHES
'FOR HOSPITAL PATIENTS
Old clothing is being sought by the
'University "Y" for men who have been
under treatment at the University
hospital and who are now, when ready
for discharge, without clothing of their
own. Any persons having contribu-
tions are requested to communicate
with tho Y. M. C. A.
DIRECTORY
Delays occurring 'in the press1
room have postponed the printing
of the 1919 Summer school direc-
tory. It is expected, however, that
the book will be ready for distri-
bution by Thursday or Friday of
this week at the latest.

Chicago, July 21.-After cruising
back and forth across Chicago's loop
district for hours the dirigible bal-
loon, bearing five persons, exploded
this afternoon, the blazing wreckage
crashing through the skylight of the
Illinois Trust and Savings bank, La
Salle and Jackson streets, in the cen-
ter of the financial district.
To night the police fixed the list of
dead as the result of the accident at
10. More than a score of persons were
injured. -
Three of the dead were passengers
on board the dirigible. The others
were employes of the bank. The ac-
cident happened at 4:50 o'clock.
Thousands of people saw the smoke
and flames that enveloped the balloon,
followed by the falling of three para-
chutes. Two of the parachutes open-
ed; the third dropped to the street.
The dirigible exploded and fell on
the roof of the bank building, and the
gas tank of the steel frame of the di-
rigible crashed through the skylight
into the main bank room, where the
tank exploded.
The fire which followed the explo-
sion was extinguished, revealing sev-
en bodies of persons, believed to have
been employes of the bank.
The airship was an experimental de-
vice modeled after army plans, and
was intended to make a daily trip be-
tween an amusement point and Grant
park.
ANN ARBOR MERMAID GIVES
SWIMMING AND DIVING LESSONS
Summer school emulators of Aphro-
dite need have no fear this season of
curbing their existences through
their inability to swim. From 10 to
12 daily Ella Rassmussen, '19, teaches
everything from high diving to the
Australian crawl.
The only charges are willingess on
the part of her pupils to get into the
water and not mind a few tastes of it.
Classes in instruction are open to
both University students and towns-
people.
Embalmers Change Work Next Week
Embalming' students will finish
their courses in chemistry, bacteriol-
ogy, and sanitary science at the end
of this week when they will' take up
the study of anatomy, to which all of
the next two weeks will be devoted.
At the end of the Summer session the
students will receive embalmers' cer-
tificates.

Tickets for the two performances to
be given by the Devereux players,
July 22, in University Hall will be
placed on sale at 4 o'clock Wednesday
in Wahr's book store. They will con-
tinue on sale Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday throughout the day.
The company has Clifford Devereux,
formerly the leading man, as director,
and Zinita Graf, well-known actress,
as leading lady. The afternoon per-
formance will be a presentation of
"The School for Scandal," and in the
evening "Romeo and Juliet" will be
given.
The Devereux players are well
known in the East, having appeared
in Harvard, Columbia, and other uni-
versities. Wherever they have played,
they have been given enthusiastic
praise, and in most cases a return en-
gagement has been asked for.
Although this will be their first Ann
Arbor appearance, it is believed that
they will repeat the successes achiev-
ed in other universities. Several of
the players are already familiar to
playgoers of Ann Arbor, through their
connection with the Ben Greet play-
ers. Chief among these are Agnes
Scott, who appeared here last year,
and William Podmore.
The aim of the organization is not
so much commercial as it is a desire
to encourage the best in drama. Mr.
Devereux's aim is to develop the best
standards of the drama, and to awak-
en a broader interest in the stage as
an institution of thought as well as
recreation.
PROFESSORS' WIVES WILL
ENTERTAIN SUMMER WOMEN
Members of the Women's league and
their friends will be entertained from
3 to 6 o'clock Thursday afternoon by
Mrs. Edson R. Sunderland, 1510 Cam-
bridge road. Miss Nora Crane Hunt
of the School of Music faculty will
sing.
Several other entertainments have
been planned by the faculty women
for members of the league and their
guests. Mrs. Louis C. Karpinski, 1315
Martin place, will act as hostess Aug.

6-Spiesberger, 820-J; 7 - Huber,
1600-J.
8-Harbert, 1387; 9-Harrison, 397.
10-Adams, C. H., 236; 11-Hardy,
1328.
12-Cobane, 609; 13-Baer, 1554.
14-Crosslan d, 609; 15-Phillips, 33.
16-Angell, 131; 17-Hert, 63.
18-Prather, 319; 19-Merry, 1317-R.
20-McClintock, 33; 21-Froemke, F.
L., 188.
22-France, 481-R; 23-Shartel, 236.
24-Hatch, 1755-W; 25-Beers, 1460.
26-Bassett, 374; 27-Merkel, 2574.
28-Sterling, 2227-W; 29-Waite, 1328.
30-Akers, 387; 31-Moulthrop, 63.
32-Buol, 374; 33-Theumissen, 849-W.
34--Munz, 1119-R; 35-Kyser, 387.
36-Lewy, 1104; 37-Bowers, 1328.
38-Hart, J. P., 131; 39-Chandler,
481-R.
40-Chapman, 1194; 41-Fischer, 374.
42-Landis, 18; 43-Gilmore, 374.
44--Selling, 1478-W; 45-Weinberg,
1104.
46-Worth, 1602-W; 47-Parsons, 374.
48-Norris, 63; 49-Hicks, 120.

The following man' drew bye,
must play winner of 48 and 49 in
ond round:

SISTER IDENTIFIES BODY
THAT OF BROTHER, AL-
BERT LAMBERT

and
sec-

AS

50-Beddow, 2139-R.
The four following men drew bye
and must play in second round:
51-Crockett, 1016; 52-Sanchez, 2280.
53-Clippert, 374; 54-Yaple, 1478-W.
First Round Drawings for Doubles
The following men drew bye and
must play in the second round:
1-Merry, 1317-R; Theumissen, 849-W.
2-France, 481-R; Chandler, 481-R.
3-Crossland, 609; Cobane, 609.
4-Gilmore, 374; Buol, 374.
5-Yaple, 1478-W; Selling, 1478-W.
6-Rood, 2532-W; Worth, 1602-W.
The two following men drew byes
and must play winner of 8 and 9 in
second round:
7-Landis, 18; Hart, 131.
The following men play in the first-
round: -
8-Merkel, 2574; Munz, 1119-R.
9-Norris, 63; Moulthrop, 63.
The following men drew byes and
must play in second-round:
10-Kyser, 387; Akers, 387.
11-Chapman, 1194; Spiesberger,
820-J.
12-Phillips, 33; McClintock, 357.
13-Fischer, 374; Bassett, 374.
14-Clippert, 374; Parsons, 374.
15-Broodryk, 496-F2; Stegman,
913-M.
16-Breakey, 1304; Sanchez, 2280-M.
17-Shartel, 236; Adams, C. H., 236.

Albert Lambert, 17 years of age, of
Chelsea, an employee of the Motor
Products company, was drowned
shortly after 6 o'clock last night a few
yards out from the municipal bathing
beach.
* Lambert's body was dycovered by
another swimmer after it had been in
the water for some 20 or 30 minutes.
Efforts to start the circulation were
to no avail, although the pulmotor was
brought into use.
One of the RAost pathetic and heart-
rending scenes ever witnessed on the
river occurred when Lambert's sister,
who was about to go in swimming as
the body was brought up to the bath
house, recognized it as that of her
brother. Miss Lambert, togetherfwith
several other companions, was chaf-
ing the limbs of the drowned man, not
recognizing him until some one turn-
ed him over on his back.
No marks were found on the body of
the drowned man and it is thought
that his death was caused by exhaus-
tion and asphyxiation, after trying to
make the 100-yard swim out to the
diving pier in the middle of the river.
The body was taken to Chelsea late
last night for burial.
REVISED LECTURE PROGRAMS
READY FOR DISTRIBUTION
Final editions of the Summer ses-
sion program have been published and
are ready for distribution at the office
of the Summer session or at the lec-
tures. Seven hundred and fifty of the
programs have been printed.
The most important addition to the
program is the announcement of the
topics of Dr. C. E. Chadsey's lectures,
"The pchools and the Community,"
and "The Superintendent, the Board,
and the Teacher," which will be given
Friday in the Natural Science audi-
torium.
NEW YORKERS DEBATE ON HOW
"BROADWAY" IS PRONOUNCED
New oYrk, July 21.-Literary circles
in New York are debating the acdent
in Broadway. Purists insist that it
should be on the "broad." Arthur
Guiterman, the merry satirist, has just
written a book of verse in which scan-
sion makes it necessary to place the
accent on the "way." He quotes from
many literary authorities in proof of
his claim.1

BI LEGION OF HOND
COSHS BY FRANC
GIVEN AS TRIBUTE OF GRA'
TUDE FOR SERVICES DUR-
ING WAR
CAPT. ANDRE TARDIEU
MAKES PRESENTATIO
Professor, Secretary of Ameri
University Union Since
Summer of 1917 -
Prof. Charles B. Vibbert of I
University has been awarded the Cr
of the Legion of Honor by the Fre
government as a tribute of grattit
for services rendered during the w
He is secretary of the American U:
versity Union in Paris, chairman
the Union's committee on French
lations, and head of the Michig
bureau of the Union.
Professor Vibbert left the Univ
sity soon after the outbreak of -t
war, having been granted a leave
absence from his office of associa
professor of philosophy. He went
Paris, where he assumed the duti
of secretary of the Michigan bure
after its establishment in the Ho
de Ville. In the latter capacity
succeeded in making the bureau
nuch service to Michigan men on lea
in Paris.
Captain Andre Tardieu, head of t
general commission for Franco-Am
ican affairs, made the presentat
on behalf of his government. At t
same time he gave crosses to Edwa
L. Hearn, general commissioner f
Europe o the Knights of Columbu
Secretary E. C. Carter of the Y.
C. A. in France, and Director Da
of the same organization; John F
ter Dulles of the American Peace co
mission, Hurting Ginn of the Ame:
can treasury department and finan
controller of the Americans in E
rope.
WHAT'S GOING ON
July 22
5 p. m.-Why the Public should be I
terested in the Education of Nurs
Prof. Dora M. Barnes.
8 p. m.--The Racial Heritage of tl
War. Prof. A. F. Shull.
July 23
5 p. m.-The Landscape Cemetery,
American Creation (Illustrate
Prof. A. Tealdi.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Ui
versity School of Music (Hill au
torium).
July 24
5 p. m.-The Manufacture of .Be
Sugar (Illustrated), Prof. W. L. Ba
ger.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictur
July 25
5 p. m.-Some Present-Day Educ
tional Problems (two lectures),,I
C. E. Chadwick, superintendent
schools, Chicago.
8 p. m.-Same lecture.
July 26
3:30 p. m. - Sheridan's "School f
Scandal."
8 p. m.-Shakespeare's "Romeo a
Juliet." The Devereux company wi
Zinita' Graf. Admission will 1
charged. (University hall).
July 28

5 p. m.-Indutrial w3emocracy, Prc
R. W. Sellars.
8 p. m-Recital. The class in Shak
spearean reading (University hall
LIEUT. HARRY A. FRANCK, '04
VISITING IN ANN ARBO

Lieut. Harry A. Franck, '04, aul
of "A. Vagabond Journey Around
World," is in Ann Arbor visiting
aunt, Mrs. L. F. McCreery, of 1
Geddes avenue.

7,

and Mrs. Edward H. Kraus, 7221

Church street, Aug. 14.

i

At 8:30-Sheridan's
"THE SCHOOL FOR
SCANDAL"

THE

DEVEREUX

COMPANY

Reserved Seats
75 Cents

University Hall, Saturday,

eare's

July. 26

SEAT SALE AT M
Opens Wednesday
Daily: 9 A.M. to 5:3

Thereafter'

ununnu

i

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