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June 26, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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.RARY CLASS POEM
3 OF THE HARDER WAY"

(By H. C. L. JACKSON)
Bearded and grey the Old Knight spoke,
He leaned upon his sword,
But 'neath his brow the lightning woke,
To flash with every word:
The Youth stood straight and tall and clean,
With sunshine in his hair,
His garments, bright against the green,q
That filled the country fair.1
Behind the Knight, a mighty crag sloped ever up and on,
And, far above, a tiny flag was limned against the dawn.
A haughty castle, heaved its wall up to the rolling skies,
And on its tower', passing tall, the young man kept his eyes.
The Old Knight spoke, and in his voice was suff'ring, keen, and pain,
And pride, that he had made his choice, and thus found joy again.
He spoke, and all the air was still, the leaves, the birds, the wind-
The very chuckling of a rill, ceased to his cadence kind:
Fling your gauntlet clanging down at the feet of Fate,
Laugh to see his beetled frown, and his leering hate,
Leave your challenge plain exposed on Time's ringing floor-
Stand before his face composed, Youth can do no more.
You are young and full of strength, full of love of strife,
I have battled till at length, Death now brings me life.
Know that you will sometine stand, old and weak like me,
Jeered by men.throughout the land, people cannot see-
Heed the tale I tell to you, mark each word with care,
Bear In mind my story true, learn my legend rare.
When these legs have ceased to move, when my breath is gone,
Then your strength the Shade willprove, you must carry on.
Long ago, there ruled the world, He whose dwelling strong,
You can see, with flag unfurled, up this slope so long.
Hate and Malice, Fear and Greed, these his captains bold,
These nide mortals weep and bleed in those days of old.
But one morn a' Knight arose, mighty man of love,
On his shield he bore a rose, on his lance, a dove.
To his standard locked a host, brave and true and stout,
Battled with the Shade, almost, set his men to rout;
Clanged the arrows then like hail, trumpets sounded shrill,
Fast retreating from the vale, came they up this hill;
Ere the shadows of the night bathed their wounds with dew,
He had given up. the fight-sought a stronghold new.
Far above the world of men, there his castle lay
There we saw his banners when, smiling woke the day.
Round beneath his mighty walls, camped our forces brave,
Pitched their tents with standards tall, and until the grave
Welcomed some, the best of life, in his keep the Shade
Railed the outcome of the strife, cursed the Fate he'd made.
Far below,, the weaker one, lived a life of ease,
Reared their daughters and their sons, little thought took these
Of the warriors near forgot on the mountain side,
Who for them had bled and fought, who for them had died.
They, the Knights, grew old and weak, they were only men,
Facing an existence bleak, till at last, again
Sallied forth the legions great from the castle's door,
Strong in everlasting hate, keen for war once more.
Down the mountain rolled the fray, we were beaten back,
Tho' we strove, our beards were grey, strength was gone, alack!
Down and down and ever down, drove they us until
He who led us saw the brown of the plains, and still
Back and back, our warriors fell; their valiant souls passed out,
Our armor echoed Death's own knell, it rang to every clout
To every blow the legions vast-the Shade's own deathless host
Bestowed, until at last, all thought the fight was lost.
Would face a sad existence bleak, would struggle, gasp, and choke
All felt that once again the weak would tremble 'neath the yoke,
As fumes of Discord, Envy, Hate, and all the foes of Good,
Destroyed with fury insensate, the dreams of brotherhood.
Our leader called upon the land, he begged for aid, and 10,
From all that multitude he scanned, came one youth, riding slow-
"We know ye not, ye hoary knights," he said with kindling eye,
"We know ye not, and still there lights a halo in the sky
Above your heads and I would fain be with you on the field,
I'll ride and bring you aid again, youngsters who will not yield."
And with a shout he. turned his steed and thundered on his way,
While we, in that sad hour of need, resumed again, the fray.
The Shade was foremost in the fight, he rushed our sweating ranks,
We wavered, shook beneath his might-and then our souls gave thanks,
For with a roar of iron feet, like thunder to the ear,
Between our forces rushed to meet the foe, a host of clear
Commanding youths, with fresh young pow'r, with gleaming sword and
shield,
They passed us in that bloody hour, and joyous, took the field.
Then up the slope the battle went, the Shade, with striving vain,
With broken sword and armor bent, was driven back again.
And we devoutly bent our knee, who lived till close of day,
We prayed to God that they might be Knights of the Harder Way.
Below them, they could see the plain, the merry spice of joy,
Above them lurked the Shade--he fain would our firm ranks destroy.

NEW LIBRARY BUILDING
S TO BE READYBY FALL
COST TO EXCEED .0RIGINAL AP.
PROPRUVTION OF
$400,000
Work on the newest campus build-
ing, the general library, has been
practically completed during the past
year, and according to present plans
the edifice will be ready for use by
next fall.
The library, besides being the new-,
est building on the campus, is. the
largest. Its original cost was placed
at $400,000 but due to the war, which
caused unnathrally high prices of
both labor and materials, this figure
has been necessarily enlarged. The
main construction work on the build-
ing has 'taken three years, many de-
lays having been occasioned by labor
shortages.
Il se Uninterrupted
One of the interesting things about
the construction of the building is the
fact that the work of the library has
gone on uninterrupted throughout the
entire period of construction. While
the wings of the building were being
constructed the business of the library
was carried on in the old part. After
the completion of the wings the offi-
ces, reading rooms, and reference
shelves were moved into these sec-
tions. The circulation and delivery
desks were transferred to the second
or main floor of the west wing, the
study room was located in the base-
ment, and the periodical room on the
third floor.
Chimes Moved
After having been stripped of its
furniture and books, the main part of
the old library was torn down. Coupl-
ed with the razing was the removal
of the old chimes to the tower of the
engineering shops, in which they are
now hung.
On the ground made vacant by the
tearing down of the old library, the
main part of the present building has
been erected. This structure, which
faces the North, is 176 by 175 feet and
is five stories in height. The base-
ment contains the book-binding plant,
the storage, rooms for the filing of
University publications, space for
general use, and the motors for run-
ning the elevators, one of which is. for
passengers.
Marble Wainscoatig
The main entrance to the library
leads into a large corridor which is
wainscoated with faun-colored mar-
ble and on the walls of which are
glass cases for the exhibition of rare
books. The second floor may be
reached by using one of the two
stairs leading from the main corridor.
In the hall on the second floor will be
located the circulation and delivery
desks where books may be obtained
before entering the large reading
room. The latter extends overnthe
entire width of the building, and is
paved with cork inlay so that noise
may be minimized. Along the walls
will be placed bookshelves eight feet
in height. At the ends of the room,
in two alcoves forned by the high
vaulted ceiling, will be placed the two
paintings by Gari Melchers which
have formerly hung in University
Hall. The pictures, one of which
deals with the theme of war and the
other with peace, were originally
painted for the World's Fair at Chi-
Seminary Rooms
The third and fourth floors will
contain seminary rooms for the use
of graduate students.
Efficiency and speed in the delivery
of books will be facilitated by an au-

tomatic book carrier.
The plans for the new building
were drawn by Albert Kahn, of De-
troit, who has been the architect of
other University structures. The
Selden-Breck Construction Co., of St..
Louis, has done most of the actual
building, while the plumbing, heating,
and electrical fixtures have been and
are being installed by the buildings
and grounds department of the Uni-
versity. The latter is also manufac-
turing the desks and other furniture.
MAJOR VAUGHAN, SUN OF DEAN,
DROWNED BATHING IN FRANCE

Seniors!

Alumni!

1.

,,,..,

How About Your

MICHIGAN SONG BOOK

Fifth Edition Now Ready

240 Pages-68 Songs

Revised-Up-to-Date

$3.00

'(&niversitg fbustc 1V
Sru. S.6S.o us
Ulitaman Ata zab

CHARLES W. GRAHAM

-:- "

BOOKS

MICHIGAN'S OLDEST BOOK STORE

TEXT BOOKS FOR SUMMER SCHOOL.
LEATHER LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOKS.'
NEERING SUPPLIES.

BOTANY AND ZOOLOGY SUPPLIES.
DRAWING INSTRUMENTS AND ENGI-
AUNDRY CASES

CHARLES W. GRAHAM
(Formerly Sheehan & Co.)
MICHIGAN'S MOST POPULAR BOOK STORE

I,

Ah, Youth, they slowly older grew, and constant watching made
Their very visages anew, their battle with the Shade-
An endless strife with him went on-true Guardians were they,
While far below, with carefree song, the, weaker went their way.
They lived and learned the bitter lot of those who help the weak,
They learned they had been forgot by men, they had' to seek
Among themselves, their friends and cheer; and ever and anon,
They faced in iron fighting gear, some foray in the dawn.
Thus did they serve with watchful eye, the brotherhood of man,
Thus kept they in his turret high, the Shade, who first began
His age-long fight, to ruin all the dreams of prophets brave.
Ere nobly blew the clarion call that rang above the grave-
Warning all mortals that they must obey the impulse clean
To aid each other, else the dust would choke their mouthings mean.

/ '

DEAN M. E. COOLEY ADDRESSES
ENGINEERS IN CLASS EXERCISES
(Continued from Page One)
started here in college, and as alumni,
to become active in any work that
would tend for the betterment of the
University.
Edmund Spanagel gave an interest-
ing history of the class from their
early days of registration. The most
Important dates, he contended, were
April 7, 1917, which changed their
college life so much, and Dec. 13, of
the following year, when most of them
got their discharges from the S. A.
T. C. He described the difficulties
that attended remaining in college to
complete an education, when the
world was at war.
Roy Elliott, class orator, said that
the day was past when the engineer
can work for himself alone, losing
himself in his own individual profit.
He said the college had taught right
thinking and true thinking. He em-
phasized the point that the engineer
should stand between capital and
labor, a friend to both, endeavoring
always to keep a true balance, and
that he should serve society for -it-
self, know the truth and not hesitate
to speak out.
SUITE AT WALDORF-ASTORIA
RESERVED FOR PRES. WILSON
New York,. June 25.-A suite of
rooms has been reserved at the Wal-
dorf-Astoria hotel for president and
Mrs. Wilson when they reach here
from Paris it was learned today.

BathingSi
WE HAVE THE TWO PIECE KIND WITH
THE WHITE BELT
GEO. J. MOE, "Sport Shof

And I, who've seen such stirring days, who've suffered, bled, and'w
My course is run, no word of praise, will pay the watch I've ke
No voice will sing my deeds of might, no man will speak my n
The world repays me with its slight, I die unknown to fame-
And yet, 'tis just, for I have seen, the brave must ever pay,
And while I die a nameless death, I've been-Knight of the Harder
Fling your gauntlet clanging down at the feet of Fate,
Laugh to see his beetled frown and his leering hate,
Leave your challenge plain exposed on Time's ringing floor,
Stand before his face, composed, Youth can do no more.

wept,

pt.
aame, Major Clarence Vaughan died re-
cently while bathing in France ac-
cording to a cablegram received by
r Way. his parents, Dean and Mrs. Victor C.
Vaughan, from Lieut-Col. Warren
Vaughan.
The four words which bore the in-
formation to the parents were, "Clar-
ence drowned while bathing."j
Major Vaughan was a recognizedj
authority on tuberculosis and on his
arrival overseas he was placed in
charge of a Paris hospital treating
that disease. He was one of the first
physicians in the state to offer his
services and was commissioned cap-
tain in the medical corps, later be-
ing promoted to his majorship. I

Parks Blaseball
Captain For 1920
Vernon H. Parks, '21, was elected
captain of the 1920 baseball team at a
meeting held after the close of the
baseball season.
Parks was, without question, the
star of the 1919 baseball team. Had
he been playing in the National league
his no-hit game against Illinois and
his one-hit game against Indiana
would have put his picture in. the hall
of fame, and yet Parks was a failure
in 1916, according to Coach Lundgren.
"Parks pitched a remarkable game
all the season that has just passed,"
said Coach Lundgren. "I wouldn't
say he was as good a pitcher as
George Sisler was when he graduated,
but he may equal Sisler's undergrad-
uate work, during the coming year.
I expect he will make a splendid cap-
tain.
"While his work this' year did not
equal Sisler's work during his senior
year, it was sufficiently good to at-
track. the attention of the scouts for
the big league teams, and all during
the year these scouts watched him

closely. That fact, in itself, spe
whole bookfull."
WISCONSIN AWARDS DEGREE
FRENCH HIGH C001MMISSI
Madison, Wis., June 25. -N
Knecht, of the French High coi
sion to the United States, was a
ed the honorary degree of doc1
laws at the commencemnt exe
of the University of Wisconsin
day. The honor is in recogniti
M. Knecht's work in pron
"friendly relations and mutual u
standing between the people o
United States and France."
IRVIN COBB AND GOETHALS
GIVEN DEGREES BY DARTMI
Hanover, N. H., June 25.--
mouth college today conferre(
honorary degree of doctor of la"
on Irvin S. Cobb, the author
Major General G. W. Goethals,
commencement day exercises.
totalling $1,200,000. made to th
lege during the last year, wer
nounced by President, Ernest M.

Bearded and grey, the Old Knight spoke,
He leaned upon his sword,
But 'neath his brows the lightning woke,
To flash with every word.
And then his cadence ceased to sound-

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