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July 12, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-12

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TH

WOLVE

INE

GEs MADE IN
LUEPROGRM

8 p. m.-Some Phases of War Sur-
gery, Dr. J. F. Breakey.

INE

ontinued from Page One)
oad to Detroit, andl steamer to
lo.
-Edwin M. Stanton, secretary
var, Prof. E. S. Corwin, of
eton university.
Reading, Halm's Ingomar, the
arian, Prof. T. C. Trueblood
versity hall).
July 21
.-"The Origin of Variation, a
amental Problem of Organic Ev-
on,' Prof. Bradly M. Hall, of
rniversity of Pennsylvania.
July 22
-Why the Public should be in-
ted in the Education of Nurses,
Dora M. Barnes.
-The Care of the Injured Sold-
[th Special Reference to the
and Deaf, Prof. W. R. Parker.

July 23
.-The Landscape C
rican Creation (
. A. Tealdi.
:.-Concert. Faculty
ity School of Music

July 30
5 p. m.-The Bataks of Sumatra (Il-
lustrated), Prof. H. H. Bartlett.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).
July 31
5 p. m.-The Effect of"the War on Sec-
ondary Schools, Prof. C. O. Davis.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
August 1
5 p. m.-Ancient Athletic Sports and
Festivals (Illustrated), Prof. A. R.
Crittenden.
8 p. m.-Reading-Barrie's The Will,
Mr. L. Eich (University hall).
August 2
5:30 a. m.-Excursion to Put-in-Bay,
Lake Erie, under the direction of
Prof. I. D. Scott, via Michigan Cen-
tral railroad to Detroit and steamer
to Put-in-Bay.
August 4
5 p. m.-La France et l'Amerique
pendant et apres la Guerre ,(in
French), Prof. Hugo P. Thieme.
August 5
5 p. m.-The Origin and Nature of
Color in Plants (Illustrated), Prof.
H. Kraemer.
8 p. m.-TIW Racial Herita'ge of the
War. Prof. A. F. Shull.
August 6
5 p. m.-The British General Election
of 1918, Prof. R. M. Wenley.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
torium).
Augut 7
5 p. m.-Where Are We Coming Out in
Vocational Education? Prof. G. E.
Myer.
8 p. m.--Educational motion pictures.
August 8
5 p. m.-Climpses in the Production.
of Munitions (Illustrated), Prof. A.
E. White.
8 p. m.-Books and Manuscripts of the
Fifteenth Century (Illustrated), Li-
brarian W. W. Bishop.
August 11
5 p. m.-French Letters and the War,
Prof. A. G. Canfield.
August 12

August 13
5 p. m.-The Political Situationin
Korea (Illustrated), Dr. W. C. Rufus.
Rufus.
8 p. m.--Concert. Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music (Hill audi-
August 14
5 p. m.-North Africa under Roman
Rule (Illustrated), Prof. J. G. Win-
ter.
8 p. m.-Miscellaneous readings. The
class in interpretative reading (Uni-
versity hall).r
August 15
5 p. m.-The All Year School, Mr.
Paul C. Stetson, superintendent of
schools, Muskegon, Mich.
8 p. m.-How Fishes See, Hear, and
Learn (Illustrated), Prof. J. E.
Reighard. August 18
8 p. m-Recital. The class in Shake-
spearean reading (University hall).
JAPANESE NOT MENACE
TO FREEPHILIPPINES
WOULD NOT GOBBLE UPl ISLANDS
IF THEY WERE INDEPENDENT,
CLAIMS.KALAW

was the main reason she gave for
nexing Korea.
Ten million Filipinos are not s
a very small people. Separated fr
Asia by tremendous waterways, t
feel themselves to be in a splendidi
lation. They think that they hav
fairly good opportunity to work
their own destiny, and in a short t
to be able fully and effectively to t
care of themselves.

an-
uch
rom
hey
iso-
e a
out
ime
ake

Summer

Session

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Attaining Independence
Was independence ever attained by
any nation without the people's taking
a chance? If absolute safety from for-
eign aggression was an essential con-
dition of independence, how many na-.
tions would be independent today?
Could Belgium alone have withstood
the httacks of Germany? Could
France? And yet, who would say that
these two countries should not be in-
dependeYkt?
The Filipino people showed during
the European conflict that they could
unitedly respond to the call of war.
They organized and equipped a full di-
vision which was ready to embark
for France when the armistice was
signed. Without the aid of a draft
law, although the call was only for 25,-
000 men, 30,000 volunteered, includ-
ing the best young men of the Phil-
ippines, the very flower of our youth.
Granted their ideal of independence,
inspired by the destiny that awaits
them, the ten million Filipinoq will
make it their business to see to it
that they have a chance of developing
their country and making it, in the
words of their representatives, "a safe
place of law, order, justice and liberty,
where Americans and foreigners as
well as nationals may live peacefully
in the pursuit of happiness and pros-
perity and safely in the enjoyment of
their property as well asof their rights:
and their liberty."

More than 300 courses conducted by a staff of 250 members
of the regular faculties of the Universiiy. All University
facilities available
Literature,, Science, and the Arts, Engineering and
Architecture, Pharmacy, Graduate Study, Library
Methods, Biological Station, Embalming and Sani-
tary Science, Public Health Nursing, June 30-
August 22; Medicine and Surgery, June 30-August
8; Law, June 23-July 26 and July 28-August 30.
The work is- equivalent in method, character and credit value to that
of the academic session, and may be counted toward degrees. All
classes of students, and especially those who desire to shorten their
period of residence at the University, or whose work was interrupted
or interfered with by the war, or associated activities, will find many
courses well adapted to their needs. Certificates of credit and attend-
ance issued. Many special lectures, recitals, concerts and excursions.
Cosmopolitan student body. Delightful location.

1919

emetery, An
Illustrated),
of the Uni-
(Hill audi-

July 24
.-The Manufacture
.r (Illustrated), Prof.'

of Beet
W. L. Bad'

.--Educational motion pictures.
, July 25
.-Some Present-Day Educa-
Ai Problems (two lectures), Dr.
. Chadwick, superintendent of
ols, Chicago.
m.-Same lecture.

aJly 26
m. - Sheridan's "School

for

..-Shakespeare's "Romeo and
t." The Devereux company with
i Graf. Admission will be
;ed. (University hall) .
July 28
-Indutrial Democracy, Prof.
. Sellars.
-Recital. The class in Shake-
'ean reading (University hall).
July 29
-A Ramble through Spain (11-
Ated), Prof.) H. A. Kenyon.

I

5 p. m.-The Duties of Sa
War, Prof. A. H. Lovell.
8 p. m. - British National
Prof. J. R. Hayden.

uppers in
politics,

'r

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d per Week
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SPECIAL SUNDAY DINNER-60c

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_ ._

(By Maximo M. Kalaw, Secretary of
the Philippine Mission)
Washington, July 11.- "Japan will
gobble you up." That is the expres-
sion of many Americans when they
hear the Filipino plea for independ-
ence. Some of those who sincerely d-
sire to comply with our wishes see the
specter of a Japanese empire await-
ing the withdrawal of American sov-
ereignty to grab the ishods
Now a nation grabs another terri-
tory, first, becau< she ,ants it; and.
secondly, because it will benefit her.
Responsible Japanese officials have
time and again said that they do not
want the Philippines, Dr. lyenaga, one
of Japan's most active publicity agetts
in the United States, once said that
Japan would not accept the Philippines
even as a gift. "Unless that gift
should be accompanied not by $20,000,-
000, the sum you gave to Spain, but
by a round billion of dollars to be ex-
pended for the education and develop-
ment of the Philipinos, Japan would
surely decline your offer. Japan has
no use for the Philippines for coloniza-
tion purposes because its climate is
as unfitted to us for that purpose as
it is for you. Our experience in Form-
osa has convinced us of that."
Many Japanese believe that with
Korea, Manchuria, and Formosa, Japan
is sufficiently occupied with territorial
dominions, and ghat in the long run it
would be more advantageous for her
to adopt a policy of righteousness and
fair dealing with all nations than to
seek new fields of conquest. An as-
surance to ,that effect would greatly
strengthen her friendship with the Al-
lies and, consequently, her own credit
abroad. And Japan knows that to at-
tempt to take the Philippines after the
United States had set them up as a
republic, and had so proclaimed before
the world, would be viewed in Americat
as an hostile act and a direct challengel
to the United States.
Willing Subjects of Japan
But there is another factor: Would
the Filipinos be willing to become sub-
jects of Japan? The Japanese them-t
selves know too well that they would
not. Dr. Nitobe, possibly the greatest
Japanese authority on colonial goyern-
ment, in an interview printed in the
Philippine Free Press on May 6, 1916,
said: "It is rash to conclude that be-
cause we are of the same race .the
Filipinos would gladly invite Japan
to be their ruler. Theyrbelieve that
they are superior to the Japanese.
Their customs and manners are influ-
enced by Christianity; hence, the un-
equalled progress in the conception of
their treatment of the weaker sex in
comparison with that prevailing in
other parts of the East."
"If Japan should ever attempt to
take the Philippines, either peacefully
or by force," says an opponent of in-
dependence, Carl Crow, in his book,
"America and the Philippines," "she
would immediately be involved in a
fight much more stubborn than the one
the United States was compelled to put
down. It is impossible to imagine the
devoutly Catholic Filipino ever sub-
mitting even to a semblance of rule
by a nation as essentially non-Chris-
tian as the Japanese, and it is equally
impossible to imagine a Christian
world allowing such a reverse to the
unbroken advance of Christianity."
Opportunity for Development
The Philippines are asking only for
an opportunity for free and unhamper-
ed development of their people and na-
tural' resources, so that they can in
their humble way contribute to the
civilization and progress of mankind.
This desire cannot injure Japan. On
the contrary, what Japan desires of
her neighbors is the least possible in-
terference by foreign nations. She so

Box 20

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Bert Lytell, who has made a rapid
stride toward the front in his latest
motion picture successes, will be pre-
sented at the Arcade today in his lat-
est production, "The Lion's Den."
Those who saw "The Spender" will be
pleased to know that Frederick Orin
Bartlett, who wrote "The Spender," is
also the author of "The Lion's Den."
Mr. Lytell has been called the most
natural male star in- pictures. 1-is
likable personality acid the kind of
pictures in which he appears help to
make his productions better than the
average. Alice Lake again supports
Mr. Lytell. Also Big-V comedy, "Fares
and Fair Ones."
Tomorrow and Monday, Louis Ben-
nison and Ormi Hawley will be shown
in "The Road Called Straight." There
is a good deal of comedy in the pic-
ture, which Bennison certainly knows
how to "put over." A Keystone com-
edy and "Jazz" Monologue are added
attractions.

I

111rziM to Thank UnP ted S tates
Rio Janerio, July 11.-Congressi
day approved a resolution thatt
Brazilian government should telegra
its thanks to the government and c
gress of the United States for thej
ception given in that county to.
Epitacio Pessoa, the Brazilian pre
lent elect. during his visit here.
AT THE ARCADE

to-
the
aph
on-
re-
Dr.
esi-

For further information, address-
T. E. RANKIN

-- . q

y,,

q

A..'QA
v Aml , A#b

I _

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