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July 10, 1919 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-10

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THE WOLVERINE

PPROPRIATIONS
INT TO $36,000;000

ized highway department has been giv-
en two million, two hundred fifteen
thousand dollars, to be used, in state
awards on road work, and various
state institutions required larger sums
than ever before because of lack of
funds has compelled them to fall be-
hind financially and to deteriorate in

O P ACT WITH GERMANY

'Y GETS $2,000,000
DORD-BREAKING
BUDGET

OF

ing, Mich., July 9.-Appropria-
y the 1919 legislature exceeded
stimates of the state's biennial
by approximately ten million
, the total reaching, in round
rs, thirty-five million dollars.
Albert E. Sleeper and members
two houses, generally, expressed
se when they learned the total
inion at the capitol seems to be
te budget was kept within reas-
bounds in view of curtailment
enditures in past years.
entry of America into the world
vhich came during the previous
n, caused a general paring of all
riations, even to the point of de-
g some of the state institutions
is necessary for their expansion,
ter that the state departments
g with war problems might be
er financial shape to function.
Past Defieiencies Made Up,
* year's increase, therefore, leg-
's hold, is merely making up for
deficiencies, to which is added
sed costs of material and labor.
appropriations of the specialj
n, just ended, amounted to about
illion dollars, the chief item be-!
r the payment for completion of
ew state office building at the
I city. .A few minor appropria-
eft over from the regular session
vere passed. In addition there
he appropriation for road im-
nent and maintenance of some-
more than five million dollars,
however, does not come from
gular taxes but will be derived
he sale of a portion of the fifty
i dollars road bonds authorized
electors last spring.
To Begin Expenditures
er the new budget the state will
egin, paying out several million
s spent on war work and fitting
e state national guard, financing
and other patriotic campaigns,
ich only a quarter million was
ally appropriated. the reorgan-

a material way.
University Gets Two Millions
Jackson prison, which has not been
provided with state funds for several:
years, on the theory that it was self-
supporting, was given an appropria-
tion of one million, five hundred thous-
and, about, for the next two years.
The Univei-sity of Michigan, with a de-
ficiency of three hundred thousand
dollars, was given more than two itfil-
lion dollars and the Michigan Agricul-
tural college was given one million.
The Industrial School for Girls at Ad-
rian has been given greatly increased
amounts as the result of disclosures
coming from the legislative inquiry
into the institution's affairs -and needs,
the award totaling close to a half a
million dollars. The reorganized state
board of health will use an additional
one hundred fifty thousand dollars in
its battle against venereal diseases.
Lapeer asylum for the feeble minded
will be enlarged by six new buildings,
for which appropriation has been pro-
vided, and a working fund of two hun-
dred fifty thousand dollars has been
established for the prisons at Ionia
and Marquette..
Appropriations by the 1919 legisla-
ture were practically double those by
the previous session but the governor
and legislature feel satisfied that the
record breaking budget only meets
real needs, at the same time consider-
ing that the people of the state are in
"better position than ever before" to
meet the call, to quote Governor Sleep-
er's own statement.
Michigan Hero Receives Three Medals
Owosso, July 9.-Lieut. Degari Jen-
nings, hero of Co. M, 125th Infantry,
has arrived home, having just been
discharged.
He has been decorated with the Dis-
tinguished Service Cross, Croix de
Guerre, Chevalier Order of St. Leo-
pold, (Belgian), and has been rec-
ommended for the congressional medal
of honor.

(Continued from Page One)
$6,000,000,000 annually for an indefinite
period.
The most revolutionary step in the
government's financial program as an-
nounced by Dr. Erzberger was the flat
statement that "it is necessary for the
)ropertied class to surrender their sup-
erfluous riches."
The measure provides for:
Expropriation of large fortunes.
Special taxation on all fortunes in-
creased during the war.
Taxation on the profits of real estate
transactions.
Taxations on amusements.
Inheritance taxes.
A federal tax on the profits by Ger-
man states from the sale of lands used
for military purposes during the war.
Additional taxes on sugar.
Three bills for additional taxes on
tobacco, matches and playing cards.I
START CONDEMNATION.SUIT FOR
400 ACRES OF CAMP CUSTER SITE
Battle Creek, Mich., July 9.-United
States District Attorney Kinnane, at
Detroit, has started condem'nation pro-
ceedings to obtain for the government
title to 400 acres of land, included in
the present site of Camp Custer, which
were not held under purchase contract.
Papers are now being served on the
score or more owners.
The 4,000 acres of the cantonment
and drill and maneuver grounds at
Camp Custer are to be made a perm-
anent military establishment it has
been decided. Prices for the land,
much of which had buildings and -tas
otherwise improved, will average $90
and $100 per acre, it is said.
Condemnation proceedings to ac-
quire for the government 655 acres
comprising Selfridge flying field at Mt.
Clemens and including a strip for pip-
ing water from Lake St. Clair, have
also been started. t
BRITISH MAY RETURN BATTLE
FLAG OF KENTUCKY PIONEERS
Louisville, July 9. - Kentucky's bat-
tle-scarred flag, carried by Kentucfy
pioneers until they surrendered to the
British and the Indians in the battle
of the River Raisin in 1812, may be re-
turned from England where it was
taken when the British army depart-
ed from America.
Part of the state's motto, "United
We Stand," is written on the standard
which was recently discovered hang-
ing in the chapelVof the Royal hos-
pital in Chelsea, London, together with
other captured flags. Gov.eJames B.
Black is working to have it re-
turned.
CHARS Y ACCEPTS DEANSHIP
AT UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
Chicago, July 9. - Dr. Charles E.
Chadsey, former superintendent of
schools in Detroit, whose few weeks'
tenure of office as superintendent of
schools of Chicago ended with the ap-
pointment of a new school board by
Mayor Thompson, has accepted an of-
fer to become dean of the college of
education of the University of Illinois
at a salary of $6,000 a year. Confirm-
ation of the report was given by Robert
Carr, president of the board of trust-
ees.
State to License 300,000 Automobiles
Lansing, July 9. - Michigan will
license 300,000 automobiles this year,
according to Deputy Secretary of State
Fitzgerald. Already 284,902 automo-
bile licenses have been issued this
year as compared with 262,126 last
year.

-I

!Sale

Our Annual July Sale is an opportunity for the Young
Men attending Summer School to Save . Considerable
Money at this

, .

STEIN-BLOCH CLOTHING
ICHAELS-STERN CLOTHING
In this sale are included only garments that are correct
in style, made from finest of pure wool fabrics and the tail-
oring of the highest quality. At our regular prices, the
crarments were a bargain and were offered for less money
than others were asking for the similar quality. At this
di:ou t, it s a renl money-saving opportunity.
THIS GREAT MONEY-SAVING S ALE
Is'11o nF. Swug
and you had better come at once in order to secure selec-
tions before the stocks are reduced.
STYLES-While we have many models for business men, yet we have an excep-
tionally fine line in waist seam and other styles wanted by young college men who want

snappy styles.

I

COLORS-Light, dark, in conservative patterns as well as the very smartest of the
new novelty effects and whatever your preference may be we can please.

Don't forget that this is the Sale where Quality Goods
at CUT PRICES.

- o

Patronize our advertisers.

e
lliddlschHN litt Apfel & Co.
l TERMS CASH DURING SALE TERMS CASH DURING SALE

GRUEN WATCHES
ILVERWARE CUT GLASS
LEATHER GOODS
ARM CLOCKS FOUNTAIN PENS
FINE JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIRING
IALEfR t FVLLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS
- - - - - - - - -;

I

a
r

re man

S 803 E. Washington Street

Regular Boarders and Transients
$5.50, $6.5o and $7.00 per lveek
Lunches 40c Dinners 6oe
Sunday Dinners 75e

PERSONALITY AND VOICE
CHARMS OF RABBI WOLSEY
(Continued from Page One)
and traditions is; almost a necessity to
anyone who would claim to be cultur-
ed and educated today. "How can we
understand modern progress," is the
way he puts it, "if we do not under-
stand the fundamentals of our civiliza-
tion? The Jews were not only the
givers of religion and ethics to the
world, but they also gave education, a
fact not generally recognized. The
Jews were the first people of the
world to have schools. And they were
the first to educate their children.
There is ample proof of this in the
Bible," and he quoted several pass-
ages.
Dr. Wolsey thinks very highly of
Michigan, and believes the new li-
brary especially a noteworthy-achieve-
mrent. He gives great credit to Pres-
ident Hutchins for having been the
important factor in its building. "Dr.
Hutchins also asked me how I Iliked
the Martha Cook dormitory. And what
do you think I said?" giving me that
look of his, with his eyes twinkling.
"I said it was - too nice, entirely
too nice!"

i

1L/4 OFF,
Clothing
Hatse nd Toggery
THREE DAYS ONLY

One Flock North from Hill .auditorium
NIV ERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Summer

essio n

1919

THURSDAY, FRIDAY, AND
SATURDAY
Out goes all our Spring and Sum-
mer Suits for Men. All our Head-
wear, our Toggery at One-Fourth
Off from the regular price if your
purchase amounts-to $5.00 or more.
If your purchase amounts to $10
yOu save .. . . . . . . . . a-&. $2.50

ore than 300 courses conducted by a stag of 250 members
the regular faculties of the University. All University
facilities available
Literature, Science, and the Arts, Engineering and
Architecture, Pharmacy, Graduate Study, Library
Methods, Biological Station, Embalming and Sani-
tary Science, Public Health Nursing, June 30-
August 22; Medicine and Surgery, June 30-August
8; Law, June 23-July 26 and July 28-August 30."
work is equivalent in method, character and credit value to that
the academic session, and may be counted toward degrees. All
sses of students, and especially those who desire to shorten their
lod of residence at the University, or whose work was interrupted
interfered with by the war, or associated activities, will find many
rses well adapted to their needs. Certificates of credit and attend-
e issued. Many special lectures, recitals, concerts and excursions.
smopolitan student body. Delightful location.

LOST-Let
that lost

the Wolverine help
article.

find

V, _. _ _. __ . _

mid=Sum mer
Sale
All Light
Three-piece Suits
I=4_Off
N. F. ALLEN CO.
The 'touse of Kuppeaheimer in Ann Arbor

If your purchase amounts to $20
yOu save .. . . . . . . . . . ... $5 0
If, your purchase amounts to $30
you save .

If your purchase
you save .

amounts to $40
. .0 .. $10.00

F. W. Gross

For further information, address
T. E. RANKIN

309 S. MAIN

Ann Arbor, Michigan

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