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July 10, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-10

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CONTINUED FAIR
TODAY

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THREE TIES

A WEEK

Fa

OL. X. No. 6.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 10, 1919.

PRICE THREE

AUTHORS PAINT
JEW .IN FALSE
"r
CLEVELAND RABBI POINTS OUT
MISREPRESENTATIONS IN
LITERATURE
AUTHOR'S IGNORANCE
CAUSES MISCONCEPTION
Barrabas and Shylock Not Typical of
Race; Marlowe Never Acquaint-
ed With Jews
That the Jew has been misrepre-
sented in literature, and for the simple
reason that the authors did not know
the character about which they were
writing, was the contention of Rabbi
Louis Wolsey, of Cleveland, O., in the
lectures given Tuesday and Wednes-
day afternoon in the Natural Science
building.
"In 'The Jew of Malta'," said Dr.
Wolsey, "Marlowe presented an utter-
ly impossible conception of the Jew.
Barrabas is not the typical Jew. How
could Marlowe paint any kind of Jew
when he never had seen one, when
there were no Jews in England at that
time? ' .
"Barrabas is painted as a fiend, with
a lust for bloodshed and human life,
and anyone who knows anything about
the Jew will know that this is untrue.
The Jew has never cared for wars, and
only fought when it was, necessary
for self-defense. The Bible proves to
us that the Jews were primarily agri-
culturalists, and a peace-loving people.
Shylock Not Typical Jew
"As for Shylock, he is also far from
being a typical Jew. Why should
Shakespeare take it upon himself to
criticize the practice of mony-lending,
when he himself made a living at it?"
The trial of Shylock is a pure farce,
said the rabbi. "In the first place, it
was not at all unnatural for the pound
of flesh clause to be inserted in bonds
at that day. And as for Portia's allow-
ing Shylock to have the flesh but not
the blood,, any lawyer will' see that
it is absurd. If the law gives the right
to do an act, it also gives the right to
dlo all accessory to that act.
Portia's Argument

SHOW TO BE GIVEN
BY COSMOPOLITANSJ
The annual Summer session enter-
tainment of the Cosmopolitan club will
be given at 8 o'clock Friday evening
in University hall. An extensive pro-
gram is being arranged by the club,
much on the same order as that giv-
en during the school year.
Some of the best talent of the cam-
pus present at the Summer session has
been secured and an unusual enter-
tainment is promised by the promoters
of the enterprise. The Cosmopolitan
club, which is composed of the for-
eign students of the University, will
probably have its members amuse with
numbers characteristic of or pertain-
ing to their respective countries.
ROTARIANS PLAN
MEMORIAL GROVES
Washington, July 9.-Rotary clubs
are planning to plant trees by the
thousands in honor of the sailors and
soldiers in the war. The American
Forestry association is co-operating
by giving certificates of registration
showing the trees have been entered
on the national honor roll the asso-
ciation is compiling. The Rotary clubs
will thus be able to give a certificate
of registration to the next of kin. '
At Richmond, Va., the Rotary club
has plans under way for planting
6,000 trees, or one for every person
who entered the service of his coun-
try. At Chicago the Rotary club has
submitted a plan to the Cook county
board of commissioners for planting
memorial trees in the Cook county
forest reserve. The Detroit Rotary
club has planted trees as has the
club at Elyria, Ohio. The club at
Washington, Ind., has plans under way
for a memorial grove.
In San Francisco, a "hero grove" has
been planted by a committee repre-
senting every civic and religious body
in the city. At Ft. Wayne, Ind., plans
have been approv'ed for a memorial
grove, and Milwaukee now has under
way a campaign for $10,000 for trans-
forming a park into a memorial grove.
Cleveland, Ohio, has dedicated "vic-
tory oaks" planted along one of its
boulevrads.

lAPS -DENY EXISTENCE
S OF PACT WITH TEUTONS
GERMANS RATIFY PEACE TREAT ;
TAKE STEPS TO RAISE
INDEMNITY
Washington, July 9.-In denial of re-
ports that a secret treaty existed be-
tween Japan and Germany, an official
statement was issued this morning
from the Japanese embassy. It says
that at no time since the beginning of
the war has the Japanese government
sought to enter into any treaty rela-
tions with Germany, and neither has
any of its agents entertained any pro-
positions of that character.
Existence of a secret treaty between
Germany and Japan under which Jap-
an was to share with Germany her
special concessions and privileges in
China in combination with Russia was
reported in a recent press dispatch
from Budapest, quoting a wireless re-
port from Moscow.
Weimar, July 9.-The resolution rat-<
ifying the peace treaty was a'dopted
by the German national assemblyto-I
day, 208 to 115.i
The text of the ratification resolu-,
tion reads as follows:1
"The peace treaty between GermanyI
and the Allied and associated powersr
signed on June 28, 1919, and the pro-r
tocol belonging thereto, as well as the
agreement relative to the occupaiton
of the Rhineland, signed same day, are
agreed to.t
"This. law comes into force on the
day of its proclamation."1
The initial step toward raising the
great war 'indemnity imposed on Ger-
many by the Allies was taken here thist
afternoon when Dr. Matthias Erzberg-
er, vice-chancellor and minister of fin-t
ance, introduced 10 new revenue .billst
designed to increase the income of the
republic by 900 per cent. The vice-t
chancellor declared it would be neces-
sary for the government to raise aboutt
(Continued on Page Four)

DENTISTY ORIGINATED
IN EGYPT AND GREECE

'PROF. N. S. 101FF TRACES DEVEL-
OP-LENT OF IMPORTANT
SCIENCE
Tracing) the development of dentist-
ry from its earliest stages in ancient
Egypt and Greece, Prof. N. S. Hoff, in
an illustrated lecture, "Some Interest-
ing Phases in the Development of
Dentistry," in Natural Science auditor-
ium Tuesday evening, showed how
America had risen to occupy the lead-
ing place in the realm of dentistry.
"It was in Rome," said Professor
Hoff, "that dentistry first became an
art, as the manufacture of plates was
first accomplished during the period
of Rome's supremacy. Not until the
eighteenth century, however, did dent-
istry reach a modern level. The sci-
ence was perfected in France in about
1762 by Fauchard, who is considered
the father of modern dentists."
"Two Frenchmen with Lafayette's
army introduced dentistry to America
when they taught two Americans what
they knew about the art. From this
time, development was rapid, because
of the great needs of Americans for the
best. It was not long until this coun-
try had forged into the lead in tech-
nical dentistry and had showed the
others the fine art in dentistry."
Professor Hoff showed that this
country now has more dental colleges
with more students and graduates
than the rest of the world. "The mod-
ern tendency in dentistry has been to'
pay particular attention to children of'
school age," said Professor Hoff.
"Great sums have been set aside for
the treatment of poor children and a'
great deal has been accomplished in
this line. Practically every city in
the country has given the school child-
ren some dental care, and in this way
the health of the growing boys and
girls is safeguarded, by providing good
teeth with which to receive the prop-
er nourishment.

SUMMER SESSION
ENROLLMENT 1,973
The total enrollment for the Summer
session has now reached 1,973, approx-
imately 200 more than the largest
Summer session in 1917 and about 700
more than the one of last year. Dean
Edward H. Kraus expects the number
of students to be at least 2,000 before
the end of the term.
The students are divided among the
various - schools and colleges as fol-
lows: College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts,, 1,004; College of Engin-
eering and Architecture, 419; Medical
school, 118; Law school, 195; College
of Pharmacy, 19; and Graduate school,
218.
Devereux .Players
To Give Dramas,

UNION CAFETERIA9
WILL OPEN WiTHII
2 WEEKS-- HEAT
DECORATING OF EATING RO(
PRACTICALLY COM-
PLETED
CAMPAIGN FOR EXTRA
FUNDS NETS $150,0

BIlHard Room and Dance
Ready For Use
October

Hall To Bi
By

Personality and Voice Are Charms
of Rabbi Wolsey, Noted Lecturer.

"Then Portia says that Sh.ylock is
uilty of an offense against the state,
r plotting a human life. But if he is
iilty, then Antonio is , also guilty,
ho entered into the bond. But he is
warded, and Shylock is beggared
id punished.hThis is all to show how
consistent Shakespeare was in his
eatment."
In discussing the Jew of Dickens,
abbi Wolsey took up two books,
)liver Twist," and "Our Mutual
riend." In the one Dickens paints
e very blackest sort of Jew, and then
the other, as an atonement, he
ints a most beautiful picture of a
int, "so perfect as to be almost

HELEN NEWBERRY TEAR BOOK
MAKES APPEARANCE ON CAMPUS
Stories, poems, snap-shots, and por-
traits, cleverly combined, appear in
generous quantity in the Helen New-
berry residence aninual, which has
just made its debut on the campus.
Under the title, "Opened by the Cens-
or," the most important events of the
university and dormitory year are
chronicled in a most intertaining
guise. The book is dedicated to Mrs.
Helen B. Joy.
The staff in charge of this year's
annual are, Grace Emery, '19, editor-
in-chief; Edna Apel, '20, businss man-
ager; Marguerite Rochat, '21, literary
editor; Helen MacGregory, '20, art ed-
itor; Frances Stevens, '21, joke ed-
itor,

Jew Not Perfect

"The Jew is not perfect," continued,
he rabbi, "he has his faults like oth-
r men. He is simply a normal human
eing, with normal feelings and norm-
I imperfections. And that is how he
rishes to be looked upon by his fel-
ow-beings--not better, but also not
ny worse than the rest of mankind."
Dr. Wolsey was scathing in his de-
unciation of those who charge the
ractice of usury to the Jew. "The
ew is a money lender, no doubt, but
: are a great many other people. In
edieval times the church itself prac-
ced it, and at the same time damned
he individual who dared to do so him-
elf."
In concluding, Dr. Wolsey pleaded
>r more earnest study and under-
anding of the Jew. "Calling a boy,
bad and helpless boy is the surest
ay to make him one. The state that
alls the Jew a Barrabas, or a Shy-
>ck, is doing its best to keep him
awn. But more toleration, more faith
nd trust, will do the opposite, and
ake the Jew a credit and a pride to
ny'country."

CAMPUS FLAGPOLE WILL BE
MOVED TO NEW LOCATION
Work will be begun next week to
change the position of the campus
flagpole to a point south of the walk
between the Natural Science and the
Chemistry buildings, according to a
statement given out by Edward C.
Pardon, superintendent of buildings
and grounds. The topmast was taken
down Monday and the remainder of
'the pole will be removed during the
week.
STUDENTS ASKED TO PLAY IN
ANN ARBOR BASEBALL LEAGUE
The promoters of the city baseball
league have met with a shortage of
material and in order to finish the sea-
son have sent in a call for summer
school students desiring to play base-
ball with either one of the teams.
Further particulars may be secured by
phoning Mr. Westerman at the city
"Y," or Fred Gallagher at 67.
23 GIRLS BORN, 23 DEATHS;
ANTI-FEMINISTS TAKE NOTE

(By M. M.)
A big, tall, dignified, fine-looking
man opened the door of his room on
the fourth floor of the Union, and in
his booming voice invited me in. And
before me I saw Rabbi Louis Wolsey,
of Cleveland, famous American rabbi
and thinker, known the country over
as an eloquent speaker of rare per-
sonality and charm, and at present de-
livering lectures under the auspices
of the Jewish Chautauqua society.
A rare personality, indeed, is Dr,
Wolsey. In his lectures he charms
by theybeauty of his voice. Low, mus-
ical, but forceful, vibrating into every
corner of the auditorium, it is per-
haps the first impression one receives.
Later the force and convictions of the
thought behind the words becomes ev-
ident, and the feeling that here is a
man who not only has a striking and
important message to deliver but who
knows how to say it, and how to
bring the matter home.
Not Dignified Preacher Alone
In his room, the first thing that
strikes you is his kindliness, his hu-
manness. He is not a dignified preach-
er who does not know how to un-
bend. But a cordial hand-shake
greets you, you are instinctively made
at home, and you feel that you are in
the presence of one of the big men
of the country. And when he starts
to talk, with a twinkle in his eye and
a laugh in the booming voice, you are
completely under the spell.
"What is the Jewish Chautauqua so-
ciety? It is a society formed to'dis-
seminate knowledge of the Jew to
those who do not know him," said Dr.
Wolsey. "The prejudice that exists
against the Jew today is the result of
ignorance. Prejudice thrives on ig-
norance. It is the purpose of the Jew-
ish Chautauqua to popularize the
ideals, the thought, the literature, the
philosophy of the Jew to those who
do not know, or have the wrong im-
pression. It is for this reason that
various speakers are sent to the sum-
mer. sessions of the different univer-
sities."
Draws Large Crowds
If all the speakers are of the cali-
bre of Rabbi Wolsey, the campaign is
sure to be a success. The crowds that
attend his lectures are proof enough
of their popularity. Everywhere on the

Much Imagined About Jew

"It is just as in the late war, when
everything was censored, we did not
know what was going on, and a
great many rumors arose, many of
them disquieting. We had to have the
real facts before we were satisfied.
And the case of the Jew has been
very similar to this. Because little
was known of his daily life, much was
imagined, and he was accused of vile
and atrocious acts of which he was
entirely innocent and .Indeed ignor-
ant.
"The war has done a great deal to
fraternize the various creeds, though
how far the friendly feeling will go
is impossible to say. The Jew is
coming into his own wherever he has
been known and understood. The only
prejudice that exists today is in the
minds of those who do not know their
subject, as was the case with the au-
thors about whom I am lecturing."

have made a deep impression.
"The reasons for the Jew's unpop-
ularity," said Dr. Wolsey, in discuss-
ing the question of just why the anti-
Semitic feeling existed, "is two-fold.
In the first place he is in the mi-
nority, and the minority are always
unpopular. In the second place, he
has been kept apart, not allowed to
mingle with other peoples, and thus
become aloof and separated. This has
given rise to the ignorance of his life
and habits, and because there was not
rquch known about him, a great deal
was invented.

Sheridan s "School for Scandal,"
and Shakespeare's "Romeo and Ju-
liet" are the two plays to be given by
the Devereux players, when they ap-
pear in University hall Saturday aft-
ernoon and evening, July 26.
It has been the custom every sum-
mer to have an entertainment of this
sort, and arrangements had been made
with the Ben Greet players to appear
this year. A previous arrangement in
England, however, made it impossible
for Mr. Greet to leave that country.
The University feels itself very for-
tunate in obtaining the Devereux
players, as they are considered among
the best companies acting these plays
at the present time. They have re-
ceived the highest commendation
wherever they have appeared, and
have been given the endorsement of
such men as Norman Hapgood, editor
of Harper's Weekly, and James C.
Egbert, of Columbia university.
Contrary to the usual custom in
presenting the plays, the performances
this year will take place in University
hall in stead of in the open.
COOLEY TO FINISH
D.- U.R.EVALUATION
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the Col-
lege of Engineering and Architecture,
has been appointed by the Michigan
public utilities commission to complete
a valuation of the Detroit United Rail-
way company's property and also its
subsidiary lines down to July 1, 1919.
The purpose of the work is to enable
the company later to re-finance itself
and make extensions, which are being
planned, by the issuance of bonds.
Dean Cooley brought the valuation of
the railway up to Jan. 1, 1915.
MANY WOMEN TAKE LESSONS IN
SWIMMING, AESTHETIC DANCING
Swimming and aesthetic dancing are
proving the most popular forms of ath-
letic activity among the women this
summer. Barbour gymnasium reports
an enrollment of more than 50 for
swimming, and dancing claims almost
as large a number.
Routine gyimnasium work, tennis,
and playground classes, including
folk-dancing and games, are also of-
fered.
PRES. HARRY B. HUTCHINS
TO RECEIVE SUMMER STUDENTS
The reception by President Harry
B. Hutchins for students of the Sum-
mer sesstbn will be held from 5 to 6
o'clock Friday afternoon at Alumni
Memorial hall. Representatives of the
different colleges will also be present
to receive the students.
This reception by the president -and
his wife is an event of every Summer
school, and it is always attended by
a large number of students.
MICHIGAN ALUMNUS ANNOUNCES
CANDIDACY FOR STATE OFFICE

Opening of the Union cafeteria in
the basement of the new building will
take place some time. in the near fut-
ure as a result of the campaign for
money to finish the structure.
The new cafeteria will be open to
students and alumni, and plans to
offer the best quality of foods at reas-
onable prices. Homer Heath, secre-
tary of the Union, said that he ex-
pected the cafeteria to'open for the
public within two weeks.
One counter for the room has al-
ready arrived, and the two remaining
ones are now on the way. The tile for
the floor has been laid, and most of
the mirrors and wall decorations have
been arranged. A soda bar will be
in operation in connection with the
cafeteria.
Campaign Started
Early this spring a campaign was
started to secure $300,000 to finish the
building. Through work of alumni
committees throughout this country,
$150,000 of this sum has already, been
secured, and it is hoped by officials
that the total amount will have been
obtained by fall.
As the funds come in, they are used
to complete the more important parts
of the building. The cafeteria will
mark the completion of the first sec-
tion of the Union, and other parts will
be in readiness for use by next fall.
To Finish Billiard Room
The billiard room on the second floor
will be thoroughly equipped and ready
in the fall and the assembly room
for dances and large gatherings will
also be completed. The weekly dances
will be held here instead of the tem-
porary building now used. It is es-
timated that 200 couples may dance
on the new floor without being crowd-
ed.
At present the lobby is unfurnished,
except for a few chairs and ,benches,
but by the opening of school some of
the elaborate furnishings will have
been secured. It is expected that fie
dining room will be ready for use in
October.
The swimming pool and the reading
room will be the last sections to be
finished as they are considered by Un-
ion officials to be the least essential.
If the full amount of the $300,000
sought is not obtained, the most un-
important parts will be left until the
finances permit their completion.
WHAT'S GOING ON
July 10
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Litera-
ture as represented by Benjamin
Disraeli, Robert Browning, and
George Eliot, itabb Louis Wolsey,
Cleveland, 0.
8 p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
July 11 '
5 p. m.-Reception by the President
for the students of the Summer ses-
sion (Alumni Memorial hall).
8 p. m.-Cosmopolitan night, by the
Cosmopolitan club (University hall).
July 14
5 p. m.-The Racial Heritage of the
War, Prof. A. F. Shull.
July 15
5 p. m.-Practicing Democracy in
School Administration, Mr. T. J.
Knapp, superintendent of schools,
Highland Park, Mich.
8 p% m.-The Hospital and the Com-
munity, Dr. C. G. Parnall.
July 16
5 p. m.-Education and Patriotism,
Dean J. R. Effinger.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the
University School of Music (Hill
auditorium).

July 17
5 p. m.-Niagara Falls and Vicinity
(Illustrated), Prof. 1. D. 'Scott.

Study -of Je
Rabbi Wolsey
study of Jewish
(Continued
AMERICANS GIN

wish Literature
beeves that the
literature, history,
on Page Four)
VEN PLACE OF

Merlin L. Wiley, '04L, of

Sault Ste.-

. HONOR IN VICTORY PARADE
Paris, July 9.-General Pershing and
the American regiment which will
march in the Victory-parade July 14,
will come directly after Marshal Foch,
who will lead the procession and the
first French division, according to the
official program which was issued to-
day. After the Americans will come
Field Marshal Haig and the British
contingent, followed by the represent-
atives of the Belgian army.

Marie, has announced his candidacy
for nomination as attorney general
on the Republican ticket. Mr. Wiley
has been a member of the state legis-
lature for three terms.

NEW

MANAGER OF ATHLETICS
FOR CORNELL UNIVERSITY

st lecture in the series of I
t Rabbi Wolsey is giving will Figures from the county clerk's of-
red at 5 o'clock this after- flice show that there were 23 girls born
en he will discuss the Jew in in Washtenaw county exclusive of Ann

I

New York, July 9.-Romeyn Berry of
this city has announced his acceptance
of the position of graduate manager
of athletics at Cornell university. He
will succeed G. Ervin Kent, who re-
signed last year to enter war service.

tj

as c

to 22 campus is asked the question, "Have
re 23. you heard Wolsey?" and his remarks

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