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July 03, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-07-03

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1 . VY W l- I ILJ
CONTINUED FAIR
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VOL. X. No. 4 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 3, 1919 PRICE THREE

HEIFETZ, FARRAR5
HOFMAN, ON 1918
CONCERT LIST

Talamon To Give
Lecture On Friday
Closing of the University for the
Fourth of July celebration will not in-
terfere with the address by Prof. Rene
Talamon, late of the French army, on

ENROLLMENT NOW TOTALS 1,887;'
FURTHER REGISTRATION EXPECTED

Women 's League
To Give Parties

NOTED ARTISTS TO APPEAR
NEXT PRE-FESTIVAL
SERIES

IN

GABRILOWITCH WILL
DIRECT SYMPHONY

Extra Concert Will' e
Preliminary Group,
Total of Six

Included
Making

In

Jascha>'Heifetz, Geraldine Farrar,
and Josef Hofman are among the
artists who will appear in Ann Arbor
next year on the series of six Pre-
Festival concerts to be held under the
auspices of the University School of
Music. Former Pre-Festival series
hAve consisted of only fixe concerts,
but there will be an extra one given

"Americans in France," to be given
as part of the Summer school lec-
ture program.
Professor Talamon has had unus-
ual experiences during the last four
years both as an officer with the
French army, as attache to the Amer-
ican general headquarters, and as a
member of the French peace delega-
tion.
In the spring of 1914, he was made
assistant professor of French after
having served' five years as an in-
structor in the French department.
That summer he took a European trip
and was in Paris when the war broke
out. Professor Talamon immediately
entered the service of his country, in
a short time rising through the lower
ranks to a second lieutenancy and
then to a first lieutenancy.
On one of the battle fronts he was
wounded, and in September, 1917, heJ
was attached to the American general
headquarters, where he served until
the termination of the struggle. Upon
his release from the army he was
called to Paris to become a member
of the French delegation at the peace
conference, where he acted as an offi-
cial interpreter.
Professor Talamon has just recent-
ly returned from Europe and is teach-
ing courses in French this summer.
He was one of the speakers at the
Victory Alumni mass meeting.
Gym Work Open
To Summer Men

-
r
t {

Figures given out at a late hour by
Dean Edward H. Kraus show that this
year's Summer session has established
itself as the largest in the history of
the University, with an enrollment of
approximately 1,887 students.
The enrollment is 700 larger than
the net total for last year and is
about 200 greater than that of the
1916 school, which was the larger
Summer term previous to this year.
Registration is still in progress and
the exact figures will not be known
until this is completed.
The registration by schools and col-
leges is as follows: College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, 949; Col-
lege of Engineering and Architecture,
415; Medical school, 114; Law school,
195; College of Pharmacy, 18; and
Graduate school, 196.
There are, of course, some students
enrolled in two schools, but these
dual registrations are expected to be
counterbalanced by the enrollment of

the biological station at Douglas Lake.
Exact figures of the attendance there
are not yet available.
Dean. Kraus accounts for the large
registration with thw following state-
ment:
"Many reasons exist for the large
number attending the Summer school
this year. The principal one, per-
haps, is the change from war to peace
conditions. Soldiers are returning,
a stimulus has been given education
by the war, and federal support is
being given to education. Regular
students are also finding it profitable
to complete their work in as short a
time as possible. Teachers have also
been given raises in salaries and they
are taking advantage of the oppor-
tunity offered by this increase of pay."
Dean Kraus expects the registration
to reach the 2,000 mark before the
end of Summer school, as it is cus-
tomary for about 125 or 150 to enroll
after the first week.

Weekly parties for women during the
Summer session will be only one of
the duplicate features of regular Uni-
versity life which are to be inaugurat-
ed this year by the Women's league.,
Under the direction of Delcia Gilbert,
'20. the league is now being organiz.
td for the summer months, and all
women on the campus will be given
an opportinity to join next week by
paying the membership fee of 25 cents.
The Women's league, which - was
founded in 1890, aims to, promote fel-
lowship and co-operation among Uni-
versity women. It has developed into
a literal clearing house for all wom-
en's activities, working through such
committees as the dramtic, social, vo-
cational, intercollegiate, and post-war
work. Through its interests, under-
graduate women are not only brought
into closer acquaintance and friend-
ship among themselves, but are given
an opportunity to meet women of the
faculty. Likewise, it has been since
its early beginning the sponsor for nu-
merous improvements in campus life,,
includiug the instituting of league
houses. dormitories, and Palmer field
for women's athletics.
The present administration of the,
league, in aiming to have its various
activities continuous through the year,
has extended the organization through,
the S_-xLiner term. Unless otherwise
stated in The Wolverine, its regular,
league parties will begin next Thurs-
day and continued throughout the sea-
son on that afternoon.

10 Alr ,,' t 131 nolk-d
Siunier"Schiool

iii

Us.S. TO SEND2
~JOUNDEO SOLIFI
HERE N EXT IF
FEDER I, ocATIONAL i1
6 lV ili'YIF
GOVERNMENT WILL I
STUDENTS' EXPEl

1

'HUNS PLOT DESTRUCTION
Of U. S. fOOD STORES

SUORTS 10 ORIENTALS

during the 1919 season.
The program is now partially corn-
,pleted, and, as it stands, contains the
names of some of the most prominent
virtuosos in America. The Detroit
Symphony orchestra will appear here
twice under the baton of Ossip Gab-
rilowitch, the distinguished pianist-
conductor. Mr. Gabrilowitch was
heard here in a piano recital during
the May Festival, but he has still to
make his Ann Arbor debut as an or-
chestra leader.
Five of the concerts of the series
have been assigned places on the cal-
endar, and the sixth will be given 4t
some time during the month of Jan-
uary. The artists to appear in the
latter have not yet been announced.
Program Follows
The present arrangement of the
program is as follows:
Oct. 19-Geraldine Farrar, assisted
by Arthur Hacke'tt, tenor, and Rosita
Renard, pianist, in a song recital.
Nov. 17-Detroit Sym'phony orches-
tra (soloist to be announced).
Dec. 4-Jascha Heifetz, Russian
violinist.
Feb. 10-Josef Hofman, pianist.
March 8-Detroit Symphony orches-
tra (soloist to be announced).
Ann Arbor Debuts
Neither of the three solo artists
named have ever appeared in Ann
Arbor, and it is expected that great
interest will attend their first appear-
ances.
The May Festival, consisting of six
concerts, will be held during four
days about the middle of May and, as
usual, will employ the united services
of an orchestra, chorus, and a number
of renowned soloists. Negotiations
are pending with artists of wide rec-
ognition to appear here at that time..
Children's Chorus
A large children's chorus, which has
proved to be such an attractive fea-
ture of febtivals in the past, will again
be assembled for the Friday afternoon
concert. The remainder of the after-;
noon's program will be given over to
organ selections by some prominent
artist.
Saturday afternoon, the orchestra
will appear in a symphony program in!
place of the customary organ recital.

Men students in the Summer school
will have the opportunity of taking
physical training this summer by en-
rolling in courses to be given in
Waterman gymnasium and on the ad-
jacent outdoor track. Dr. George A.
May will receive applications in'
Waterman gymnasium from 10 to 12
or from 2 to 5 o'clock daily except
Saturday afternoons.
Outdoor classes in practical work
will be given Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday afternoons of each week at 4
o'clock, while lecture classes will be
held on Tuesday and Thursday at the
same time. This work is planned es-
pecially for those who expect to teach
physical training.
Locker tickets may be secured at
the office of the treasurer of the Uni-
versity, the fee being 50 cents for the
Summer session. Regular students
who are attending the Summer term
must obtain new lockers.
VISITORS' TICKETS TO
OBSERVATORY NOW READY
Tickets may now be obtained for
visitors' nights at the Observatory on
presentation of the treasurer's re-
ceipt at the Summer session office.
As a limitation of 150 is placed on the
number permitted to visit the observa-
tory each evening, Dean E. H. Kraus
'does not expect to be able to supply
all the demand for tickets. The Ob-
servatory proved very popular last
Summer and even larger crowds are
now in prospect.]
Groups of 50 will be taken through
ithe Observatory together and the ope-;
rating of it will be explained to them.
Each one is permitted to view the
moon through the large telescope. The
trip lasts for one hour and, as par-
ties will start through at 8:30, 9:30,
and at 10:30, every one is urged to
be there promptly. N
The nights set aside for visits to
the Observatory are July 7, 8, and 9.
REV. L. A. BARRETT TO GIVE
TALKS ON "RE-ENFORCElAENT"

Berlin, July 2.-Destruction of ele-
vators containing American food ship-
ments was aimed at in a plot just un-
coveredsat Hamburg, according to the
Lokal Anzeiger. The conspirators, it
was said, were some of the convicts
released from the Hamburg prisons by
mobs during the recent riots.
Authorities gained knowledge of the
plot through members of the Seamen's
union, whose aid was sought by the
ptotters.
The communistic leaven has again
arrived to the fermenting stage in
greater Berlin and there are indica-
tions th.at the strike movement may
develop into a political insurrection.
The candor and boldness with which
the independent socialists and their
communist henchmen are playing their
cards shows they feel surer of their
footing than during the March revolt.
Car Strike Growing
The street car strike threatens to in-
volve the suburban and belt line rail-
road workers, if not the big industrial
plants. The frankness with which
Hugo Haase, Herr Hoffman and other
radicals are now demanding a dic-
tatorship by the proletariat is looked
upon as significant. In the meantime
Gustav Noske, minister of defense, is
increasing his troop patrols in the
inner city, planting reels of barbed
wire at strategic points and generally
tightening martial law regulations.
Workers Influenced
The cessation of the city rail traffic
has had its influence on the workers
of the suburban roads and belt lines,
which stopped operating on the ground
that overcrowding of the cars is con-
trary to public safety.t
Berlin's downtown streets today
again were jammed with long lines of
two, three and four-wheeled vehicles,
many of early types, which readily
brought high fares.
The most serious phase of the situ-
ation is the attempt of the striking
railworiers to halt the movement of
freight cars, especially those carry-i
ing incoming food and coal supplies. i
Windows Overlooking Parade CostlyI
Paris, July 2.-Windows and bal-i
conies from which to see the victoryE
parade in the Champs de Elysees, Julyt
14, are being rented at from 2,000 to
25,000 francs each.

The Barbour scholarship for orien-
tal women has during the past ses-
sion supported 10 Chinese and Japan-
ese women students in the University
of Michigan. This scholarship is a
fund of $100,000, the income of which
is used to pay the expenses of 10
oriental girls every year.
The scholarship was founded by
former Regent Levi Barbour, who has
made numerous other gifts to the
University. Regent Barbour donated
a large part of the money for the
construction of the Barbour gymna-
sium and has also given a sum of
money for the construction of a girls'
dormitory, to be known as Betsy Bar-
bour house, and which will soon be
begun on the site now occupied by
West hall.
In the past all of the students cared
for by the scholarship have been eith-
er Chinese or Japanese women. Appli-
cations, however, have now been re-
ceived by Dean Effinger, the trustee of
the fund, from Korea and India, and
in the near future students from those
countries will ieceive the benefits of
the scholarship.
ECUADOR WILL CELEBRATE
ON U. S. NATIONAL HOLIDAY
Washington, July 2.-Quito, Ecua-
dor, will celebrate the signing of the.
peace treaty July 4. An announce-
mnent today said the Ecuadorean gov-
ernment probably would declare July
4 a national holiday so as to co-oper-
ate with the American legation at
Quito in celebrating peace and the,
American national holiday at the
same time.
DETROIT ARTIST TEACHING
DRAWING AND PAINTING HERE
Mr. Roman Kryzanovsky is conduct-
ing the classes in drawing and paint-
ing during the Summer session. Mr."
Kryzanovsky is a well known De-
troit painter who received his' train-'
ing at the Julien and Colarossi Acad-
emies in Paris. He has exhibited ex-
tensively and has received a number of
medals and other distinctions for his
paintings.

BISHOP' SPEAKS BEFOE
AMEICN LIBRARIANS
SAYS ASSOCIATION SHOULD CON-
TINUE SERVICE TO AM1Y
AND NAVY
At the recent conference of the
American Library association William
Warner Bishop, retiring president of
the association and librarian of the
University, gave an address in which
he outlined a number of new duties
and services which the association
ought to render as a result of its war-
time experience. Chief among these
was its service to the army, navy, and
marine corps-a function which he
believes should be continued.
Sections of the address follow:
"And so we meet again after a year
to take up with renewed zest. ahd
energy those problems of our work
which we are accustomed to attack
in our annual gatherings. And yet
we. are none of us quite the same as
we were in 1917 or 1916. Our work,
while still 'the trivial round, com-
mon task,' is not done in exactly the
same spirit as of old. We have dream-
ed dreams and seen visions, and we
are turning to the future of our own
library service with a profound con-
viction that it is service-public ser-
vice of the highest type. To that end
we are met-to consider our war ser-
vice and to render an account of our
stewardship in that branch of our
labors; to transact our routine busi-
ness and to hear and discuss report
of our committees; but chiefly to sur-
vey our own capacities, and to talk
over the possibilities of the near fut-
ure. This is a forward-looking con-
ference. No other could be held by
progressive Americans in this year of
grace 1919."
"No single fact in connection with
very significant thing that the United
States governmemt through the com-
mission on training camp activities
applied to this association to render
service along strictly professional
lines. It asked us as librarians to
contribute our professional services,
just as it asked the doctors and the
chemists to serve as doctors and chem-
ists. That such a thing was possible
shows that the value and need of the
librarian's work in massing, arrang-
ing, and interpreting books had at last
gained the recognition which it de-
serves.
No single fact in connection with
our war service has more significance
for us as 've face the problems of
peace than this recognition. Our war
service was sought and was perform-
ed on the ground of our special fit-
ness to give it. The history of the
library war service has been one of
steady gain in tihs sort of recogni-
tion, for the discernment of certain
far-seeing men in Washington did not
(Continued on Page Six)

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Approximately 250 disch
wounded soldiers will attend the
versity of lichigan next fall a
expense of the government, acco
to a statement made Wednesds
Dean John t. Ellinger.
District Superintendent Edwar
the Federal Vocational board w
conference with Dean Effinger We
day concerning the matter. Cont
with the government have been
and everything is ready .for th
ception of the soldiers.
The Vocational board was e
lished for the purpose of looking
discharged wounded soldiers an(
made the education of the men a
of their program for ecorstIl
the wounded'. The government
pay each soldier $75 a month foi
ing expenses to attend school, a
same time paying also for all
dentals such as tuition, books,
even tutoring.
Agreements of a like sort have
entered into with many of the
large universtiies. The soldiers
will be able to take advantage o
Opportunity will have been disci
ed, although their wounds range
gas and disease to loss of limbs
other disabilities.
Some of the men were in ati
a,ce at univemsities before ent
the service, btmt th-cre were many
had given up hope of a higher
cation a fter completing their
school ormk and had gone into
cess There are also a numbe
irvmin wmlo had just completed
econdary edu i;on befotnr ent
the service.
About 10 men who are taking
vantage Hof the government's offei
already enrolled in the Sum ner
ion.
. WA'S GOING W

SIXTY SCHOOL MEN MEET AND
ORGANIZE EDUCATIONAL CLUB

Sixty superintendents, principals,
and teachers in public schools met last
night at the Michigan Union and or-
ganizedan Educational club, of which
Supt. C. L. Poor, of Hudson, Mich., was
elected chairman.
All men conected with public school
work are eligible to membership, and
it is expected that a number will avail
themselves of the opportunity to join.
The next meeting of the club will be
in the form of an outdoor dinner to be
held at 6 o'clock next Thursday even-
ing, at a place to be announced later.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Streets
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Rev. L. A. Barrett speaks. Theme: "Reactions"
11:45 A. M.-Prof. W. D. Henderson speaks, to Bible Class
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Evening Service
Summer Students Cordially Invited

,July 3
8 p. mi.-F1ducational iotion pictur
July 4m npi
5 p.. --America in France, P
Rene Talamon, Iieutenant in
French army.
July7 .
5 p. um.-The Problems of Volcan:
(Illustrated), Prof. W. H. Hobbs.
8:30 p. m.-- Visitors' night at the C
servatory, admission by ticket on
July S
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Lite
ture as represented by Christop
Marlowe, Wiliam Shapespeare, a
Richard Cumberland, Rabbi Le
Wolsey, Cleveland, 0.
8 p. m.--Some Interesting Phases
the Development of Dentistry (111
trated), Prof. N. S. Hoff.
8:30 p. m.---Visitors' night at the C
servatory, admission by ticket o
July 9
5 p. m.--The Jew in Engslish Lite
ture as represented by Walter S5
and Charles Dickens, Rabbi Lc
Wolsey, Cleveland, 0.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the U.
versity School of Music (Hill au
torium).
8:30 p. m.-Visitors' night at the
servatory, atmission by ticket on
July 10
5 p. m.-The Jew in English Lite
ture as represented by Benja
Disraeli, Robert Browning,
George Eliot, Rabbi Louis Woh
Cleveland, 0.
8 p. m.---Educational motion pictu
NO W1O1VERlI '4AT1'RDAY
The Wolverine will not be Issu
ed on Saturday of this week, In
stead, there will be four edition
next week, one each on Tuesda
Thursday. Friday, and Saturda

CARRIERS WANTED

Several good live students are
wanted at once to deliver The
Wolverine. Liberal pay is offer-
ed. Apply at The Wolverine office
either Friday morning from 10 to
11, Saturday afternoon from 4 to
5. or Monday afternoon from 4 to 5

The Presbyterian church, of which
the Rev. L. A. Barrett is pastor, has
planned-a series of services for the
benefit of Summer school students.
The Rev. Mr. Barrett's subject for the
summer sermons will be "Re-enforce-
ment." Next Sunday the first of these
lectures will be delivered on the sub-
ject of "Reaction."
Prof. W. D. Henderson will conduct
a series of lectures to the students at
11:45 o'clock every Sunday morning.
The services wifl be held at the regu-
la~r hours.a

MICHIGAN UNION

NOTICE TO MEMBERS OF THE

The Dining Room at the Michigan Union will be open during the
Summer Session. As Summer School students miss a large number of
their meals during the week and at week-ends, we recommend the use
of our coupon book system instead of paying regular board.
$5.50 IN COUPONS FOR $5.00

mamman

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