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June 28, 1919 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-06-28

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OLVERINE

A

a OLVERINE

rines

.ngton, June 28.-U. S. marines
ave hobnobbed with Filipino
nters, and have long ' been
y with the Chamorros of
met their Waterloo when they
o establish the entente cordiale
he -Cha-Chas of the Virgin is-
rding to the marines the Cha-
re "poor mixers." They live
west side of the harbor of
te-Amalie, decline to mingle or
arry with the negroes, and re-
ay outside interference with.
dffairs. They are the hardest
s and best workers on the is-
heir industry bringing them
'living as fishermen and weav-
straw hats. The tribe is said

to have come originally from the
Dutch and French Leeward islands.
So far the marines have taken only
long distance observations of the Cha-
Chas. For while the tribe is not hos-
tile, its members plainly indicate that
they want to be left alone.
DR. WELLS TO TALK ON "THE
NEW DAY;" LEAVING FOR EAST
"The New Day" will be the subject
Sunday morning of the last sermon
of the season by the Rev. J. M. Wells,
pastor of the First Baptist church. He
will leave Sunday afternoon for the
eastern states, where he will lecture'
for two months under the auspices of
the Pennsylvania Chautauqua associa-
tion.
During the month of July, the Rev.
Frederick B. Igler will be the acting
pastor of the church. .

NIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Summer

Session

1919

re than 300 courses conducted by a staff
he regular faculties of the University.
facilities available

of 250 members
All University

Literature, Science, and the Arts, Engineering and
Architecture, Pharmacy, Graduate Study, Library
Methods, Biological Station, Embalming and Sani-
tary Science, Public Health Nursing, June 30-
August 22; Medicine and Surgery, June 30-August
8; Law, June 23-July 26 and July 28-August 30.
e work is equivalent in method, character and credit value to that
the academic session, and may be counted toward degrees. All
sses of students, and especially those who desire to shorten their
'iod of residence at the University, or whose work was interrupted
interfered with by the war, or associated activities, will find many
arses well adapted to their needs. Certificates of credit and attend-
ce issued. Many special lectures, recitals, concerts and excursions.
smopolitan student body. Delightful location.'

FILIPINOS 70 APER CENT
LITERATE, SAYS CENSUSs
MEASURES TAKEN BY LEGISLA-
TURE POINT TO HIGHER
PROPORTION
-j
Washington, June 28.-Seventy per
cent of the inhabitants of the Philip-
pines over 10 years old are literate, as
shown by the 1918 census, according
to a cable just received by the war de-
partment from Vice-Governor Yeater
at Manila.
Of the estimated population of 10,-
500,000, 10,000,000 are civilized Chris-
tians,' while 500,000 represent the non-
Christians or so-called wild tribes.
The latter, however, are included in
the poulation of which 7 per cent are
literate.
The percentage of literacy in the
Phillipines, as shown by the census
just completed, is almost as high as
that of some of the southern states of~
the union, higher than that of Greece,
Italy, Portugal, Roumania and Ser-
via. It is also higher than that of any
of the new countries whose indepen-
dence is being recognized by the al-
lies.
It is pointed out there is every rea-
son for the literacy of the Philip-
pines to be still higher within the next
few years, through the action of the
Philippne legslature at its last session
in voting 30,000,000 pesos to extend the
educational system so that schools will
be available to every child and youth
in the Philippines.
Between 1912 and 1918 the total
number of children in school increas-
ed from 440,000 to 675,000, a gain of
54 per cent in six years. The number
of intermediate pupils grew to 67,000,
a gain of 160 per cent. The number of
high school students reached 16,000,
a gain of 220 per cent.
Tle Philippine legislature, composed
entirely of Filipinos, now supports
4,700 schools, with a teaching force of
12,303 teachers. All instruction is in
English, and will continue to be if in-
dependence is granted. A large num-
ber of additional American teachers are
to be employed and sent to the Philip-
pines within the next year. All of the
expense of education is being paid by
the Philippine government.
SCHOOL TEACHERS
THREATEN STRIKEj
San Juan, June 27. - Porto Rico is
threatened with a strike of 2,500
school teachers unless the legislature
makes provisions for an increase in
teachers' salaries. The teachers are
expected to refuse to sign contracts
for the next school year at the pres-
ent scale of salaries.
Francisco Vicenty, president of the
Teachers' association, has started the
strike campaign.
Commissioner of Education Paul G.
Miller put the question of raising
funds to pay teachers adequate sala-
ries squarely up to the legislature.
"If the legislature takes the view
that there is no money in the treasury
with which to pay teachers, the an-
swer is that the legislature is the
only agency in Porto Rico that can put
money in the treasury by proper rev-
enue measures," said Commissioner
Miller. 'It is high time that teachers
should have an addition of real cash
rather than mere words or praise."
Rural teachers are receiving $40,
graded teachers $60, principal and
teachers of English $75 a month. This
is far from what they should receive
for their services in view of the high
costof living and especially in view

of the fact that Porto Rico has been
highly prosperous in recent years. Not
only has the assessed valuation of
property been increased from $182,-
000,000 to $243,736,000 but our mer-
chants have made handsome profits
due to war prices and our planters
have sold their products at figures
never received before.
"On the other hand teachers' sala-
ries were materially reduced by the
legislature in 1914. Rural teachers
have since received an increase of $2
a month which is insignificant."
WORK TO BEGIN ON FLINT
BANK AND OFFICE BUILDING

d

Zshe

I

'

1

I

For further information, address
T. E RANK IN

20

Ann Arbor, Michigan

BusyBee
At your serviCe
ALL SUM MER
N-
-
13 S. State Phone 1-3 ~
lII 11111111'111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111lig 1111111111111111 111 II~i

$1.00

"The best part of
summer school"

11

FREE

II

A 35c summer school directory free

with each subscription

News of the

CAMlPUS

CITY

Copy
I and
milta

I
B SI
Q - m

B
LN G

Leave Copy
at
Quarry's and
The Delta

WORLD

vi

FOR SALE
1E-20 shares of Internation-
phone Company stock at $500
re. Address Jos. Hardy, care
k Coal Company, Columbus
WANTED

LOST
LOST-One Hundred Dollars in bills
between the Farmers and Mechanics
Bank on State St. and St. Joseph's
Sanitarium. Finder notify St. Jo-
seph's Sanitarium and receive lib-
eral reward.
LOST-Let the Wolverine help find
that lost article.
MISCELLANEOUS

Flint, June 28. - Active work is
scheduled to commence next week on
the new 10 story fireproof combination
bank and office building for the First
National Bank and the Genesee Coun-
ty Savings Bank of this city. The
entire operation, from construction
through to decorating, equipping and
furnishing will be under the direction
of H. E. Bond, field superintendent for.
Hoggson Brothers, the Chicago and
New York bank planning specialists,
who have the contract for the build-
ing in its entirety.
Wolverine delivered at your door
three times a week at $1.00 per term.
Suhsrihbe for The Wolverine

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