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August 21, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Wolverine, 1919-08-21

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00

'14

A WEEK

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, AUGUST 21, 1919

PRICE T

1'

"MIL" CANGSS
ITREATTEXT
HAS MET RESERVATIONISTS MORE
THAN HALF WAY, SAYS
PITTMAN
REPUBLICANS TO DENY
SUPPORT TO NEW PLAN
G. 0. P.'s Will Insist on Including
ReservatIons in Ratification
Resolutions
Washington, Aug. 20. - President
Wilson has given his approval of the
substance of the reservations urged
by the group of Republican "mild
reservationists," Senator Pittman, of
Nevada, Administration Democrat and
member of the senate foreign relations
committee, declared this afternoon in
the senate.
In stating to the committee at the
White house yesterday that he had
no objection to - "interpretations" if
they were not embodied in the reso-
lution by which the senate will ratify
the treaty of Versailles, the president
has met the reservationists more
than half way," Mr. Pittman said.
The Nevada -senator submitted a
draft of reservations he indicated
would be satisfactory to the presi-
dent. These reservations, incorporat-
ed In a senate resolution intended to
be separate textually from that of
ratification, were prepared by Mr.
Pittman after he conferred with the
president.s
Latest Move
The senator's action was regarded
as the latest move by the adminstra-
tion forces to expedite ratification of
the treaty.
Senators Lodge, Knox and other
Republican senators were quick to
declare that they would continue to
insist upon any reservations being in-
corporated In the resolution of rati-
fication despite the president's objec-
tion to such a course.
Senator Pittman's resolution, how-
ever, was designed to develop a line-
up between those senators willing to
accept the president's suggestion of
"interpretations" and those who ad-
vocate the adoption of reservations
as a direct part of the ratification act.
Resolution as Follows
The Pittman resolution read as fol-
lows:
"That when the senate of the.United
States shall advise and consent to
the ratification of the treaty of peace
with Germany, signed at Paris on the
28th day of June, 1919, now pending
in the senate, it was done with and in
consideration of the following under-
standing as to the present and future
construction and interpretation to
be given to the treaty:
"First, that whenever the too
years' notice of withdrawal from the
League of Nations shall have been
given by any member of the league,
as provided in article one, the gov-
ernment giving such notice shall be
the sole judge whether all its inter-
national obligations and all its obli-
gations under the covenant shall have
been fulfilled at the time of with-
drawal.

NEW FELLOWSHIP
ESTABLISHED HERE
A fellowship in highway engineer-
ing will be offered this fall to a stu-
dent in the engineering college, ac-
cording to a notice just received by
Prof. H. E. Riggs. It will be given
by the Detroit Edison company, and
will be known as the Detroit Edison
Fellowship on Highway Engineering.
The fellowship will be available to
any student specializing in highway
engineering. It will run two years,
the student receiving it getting $500
a year, and $100 additional each year
for laboratory expenses.
Professor Riggs said that the award
of the fellowship had not yet been
made, but that the selection would
be made soon.
sparks To Report,
On Grid In Tal
Cliff Sparks, star quarter and half
on the 1916 and '17 football teams, will
be back for his third season under
Yost this fall. Definite announce-
ment that Sparks would report for
preliminary practice was received by
the athletic officials this, week.
The good news that Sparks would
be back was partially offset by the
wordthat Phil Raymond, 1916 half-
back, would not be out for the 1919
team. Raymond will be in the Uni-
versity, but says he will not come
out for football.
Raymond played great football on
his service elevens and would have
been a valuable addition to Yost's
squad this fall.' He and Peacock are
the only two men who have definitely
announced that they would not- re-
port for early work.
Ted Boville, Varsity end last year,
and Guy Culver, who was on the 1917
freshman team, have reported that
they are still uncertain, but it is
hoped that both men will decide to
come out for the 1919 Varsity. Peach
and Loucks are still in service, but
both hope to get out in time to play.
Captain Goetz, Czysz, Ward Cul-
ver,' Weston, Sparks and Froemke are
the Varsity men who have announced
that they will be on hand for the early
practice. Wilson, Barnes, and Eades,
who have yet to win their Varsity
letters, will also be present Sept. 15.
There, seems to be little doubt
about the return of Vick, Fortune,
Knode, Cruse, Cohn, Rye, Steke-
tee, and Perrin, so that Yost will be
assured a full Varsity team to start
the season.
SENATE PASSES REPEAL OF
DAYLIGHT LAW OVER VETO

Coach Lundgren to Arrive Soon
Carl, Lundgren, Varsity baseball coach, who is to assist Yost in coach-
in'g the 1919 football team, is expected in Ann Arbor within a few days.
Lundgren has been attending a school for coaches at the University of
Illinois during the summer.
Lundgren will handle the backfield candidates this fall, while Ernest
J. Allmendinger will direct the work of the linemen. Lundgren played
half on the Illinois Varsity eleven for four years, so he is well qualified
for his new work.
He has coached the baseball team for the past five years, during which
time he has won one national championship for Michigan. He has turned
out uniformly good nines.
While at Illinois,.Lundgren played four years on both the baseball and
football teams. Although his work on the gridiron was good, his won-
derful pitching made him more famous as a baseball player.
Following his graduation he played for several years with the Chicago
Cubs, aiding them in winning the league and world's championships. Lund-
gren was one of the greatest college pitchers ever developed in the West,
and his knowledge of the hurling art has enabled him to turn out several
first class pitchers while at Michigan.
While he has never coached football before, Lundgren's knowledge of
the game, his playing experience and his ability to impart his knowledge
to young players insure his success in his fall work. Lundgren will be in
Ann Arbor the year round, coaching football in the fall and baseball in the
spring. In this way he. will be able to keep better in touch with the men
on the teams, and will also be able to devote more time to individual

ATHLETIC TROPHY
RECEIVED HERE
Michigan has just received a ban-
ner won at the Drake telay carnival
last spring when Johnson, Losch, But-
ler and Meese won the half-mile re-
lay race. This was the first Drake

V.5.-MEXICO CLA
LOOMS' AS TRO(
PURSUE OUTLI

relay race ever won by a Michigan PUNITIVE EXPEDITION IWAY

coaching than was possible when he
in the year.
BILL WOULD BAR ALL
ALIENSFOR 2 YEARS
JOHNSON INTRODUCES NEW PLAN
To RESTRICT Ii.MIGORA-
TION
Washington, Aug. 2.-A bill to stop
all immigration for two years, and to
deport all aliens who withdrew their
first papers 'in order to escape mili-
tary service during the war, was in-
troduced today by Chairman Johnson,
of the house immigration committee.
After the end of the two-year sus-
pension period aliens would be enti-
tled to admittance to the United
States only under a passport or on
their written declaration to become
American citizens. They would be
required to register annually until
citizenship was conferred. Fraudu-
lent entry would be punishable by five
years' imprisonment and $1,000 fine,
to be followed by deportation.
Few exceptions to the prohibition of
immigration for two years are permit-
ted by the bill. Alien residents of the
United States might send for their
parents, grandparents, unmarried or
widowed daughter, or son under 16
years of age, unless these relations
had been alien enemies, for whom spe-
cial authorization would be required.
Skilled labor also might be import-
ed under existing law, and foreign
officials, tourists, students and pro-
fessional men might come into the
country temporarily under passports.
MICHIGAN MAN RISES FROM
GOB TO SENIOR LIEUTENANT

was in Ann Arbor but a few months

PALMER OPPOSES PRICE
FIXING B0Y PRESIDENT

URGES HOUSE COMMITTEE
WITHDRAW PROPOSED
AMENDMENT

TOI

Washington, Aug. 20-Attorney Gen-
eral Palmer appealed to the house
commttlee on agriculture today to
withdraw its proposed amendment giv-
ing the president authority to fix
prices.
The attorney general said such a
drastic provision was unnecessary,
that it would provoke too much dis-
cusion, and delay action in getting
after profiteers and would require re-
building of the food administration,
which he deemed impracticable.
Mr. Palmer also urged that the
committee eliminate a provision ex-
empting from prosecution for profit-
ering retailers who do an annual
business of less than $100,000. Such
an exemption is particularly undesir-
able, the atorney general said, be-
cause the government wants to go aft-
er the small retailers because many
of the complaints of profiteering are
lodged against them.
It was reported tonight that the
committee probably would yield .to
the attorney general's wishes.-
Before appearing before the commit-
tee the attorney general made public
a list of food seizures, the largest
having been taken under libel pro-
cedings up to Aug. 16. The list is as
follows:
Aug. 11-Columbus, Ga., 7,000 lbs.
sugar.
Aug. 15-St. Louis, Mo., 2,000,000
tbs. pork.

team.
Michigan's relay teams have been
successful on many occasions at the
Penn Relay carnival, but never un-
til 1919 did a Michigan team win a
Drake relay race. To accomplish the
feat this year the Michigan quartet
had to run the half mile in 1:29 4-5,
within a second of the record for this
event.
Coach Farrell is proud of the ban-
ner, which is 'hung temporarily in
the .Athletic association office but
which later will be hung in the tro-
phy room at Waterman gymnasium.
According to Farrell, this is but the
first of many Michigan victories that
are to follow at Des Moines.
Farrell is planning on at least two
short and middle distancerelays next
year. Many track men, just out of
service, will be back to swell the
ranks of those who were here last
year, and there will be a wealth of
material out of which to mold relay
teams.
Treaty Delays
Wilson's Tour
Washington, Aug. 20.-The date up-
on which President Wilson will start
his proposed speaking tour now de-
pends, to a great extent, upon how
soon the foreign relations committee
of the senate reports the peace
treaty, it was said in White House
circles today.
It was stated that if Senator Knox
reflected the disposition of the entire
membership of the committee when he
said the treaty probably would re-
main in committee for several weeks,
there was a possibility that the presi-
dent would not get away for some
time. Physically, the president would
be able to start today, having never
been in better health and having fully
recovered from his recent indisposi-
tion. .
The White House conferences with
Republican senators probably will be
resumed in the near future, officials
said today.
EXPLOSION AND FIRE DESTROY
OIL IN BALTIMORE FACTORY
Baltimore, Aug. 20. - Fire which
started this afternoon, with an explo-
sion in the oil plant swept the Sher-
wood Brothers' factory in the eastern
part of the city.
Several of a score of big tanks con-
taing lubricating oil, caught fire.
At 4 o'clock the fire was declared
to be under control. It was confined
to the Sherwood plant. A large ware-
house stored with kerosene and lu-
bricating oil and 20 tanks containing
lubricating oil were destroyed.
PRUSSIANS PLAN TO GIVE 170
MILLION MARKS TO WILHELM
Berlin, Aug. 20. - A bill has been
submitted to the Prussian cabinet
which provides that 170,000,000 marks
shall be given to former Emperor
William as total settlement for the
civil list he lost through "forced ab-
dication," according to a Weimar dis-
patch in the Freiheit. The cabinet
has not reached a decision, it is said,
because the scheme is opposed by
Herr von Braun, minister of agricul-
ture.
RODMAN HIMSELF TO PILOT
ARMADA INTO 'FRISCO BAY
Santa Barbara, Cal., Aug. 20.-Ad-
miral Hugh Rodman 'will pilot the
Pacific fleet through th golden gate
and into San Francisco bay. "I shall

pilot the fleet into San Francisco
myself," said the admiral today, -"as
a matter of pride in the skill and
efficiency of the navy and because I
want to demonstrate how magnificent
is the Bonita channel to those who
really know it."
Senate Confirms Palmer's Nomination
Washington, Aug. 20.-Nomination
of A. Mitchell Palmer to be attor-
ney-general was confirmed late to-
day by the senate without opposi-
tion.-

INTO CONTACT WITH CAR-:
RANZA MEN
WITHDRAW AMERICAN
FORCES, ASKS CONSI
Clear Understanding Thought to Ri
Existed with Mexican
Government
Washington, Aug. 20. - Carrar
troops and the American punitive
pedition pursuing bandits in Mex
may clash.
This possibility was indicated
night when the Mexican ambassac
made public a message from the Me
can consul at Presidio urging t
the war department be induced
withdraw Colonel Langhorne's for
"to avoid difficulties."
So far as could be learned, I
ambassador has made no represen
tions to Washington, but it ,
made clear in official quarters t
the troops sent to pursue bandits w
captured Aviators Davis and Peters
and held them for ransom would v
be withdrawn at this time under a
circumstances.
Conflicting reports regarding I
attitude of Mexican authorities -
ward the American expedition we
received. A dispatch to the war 0
partment from General Dickman, co
manding the southern department,'
dicates that the Mexican consul b
agreed that Carranza troops whi
had been ordered in pursuit of t
bandits would be held back so th
contact with the Americans might
avoided.
Message Advises Retirement
The message to the Mexican anibt
'sador from the consul at Presidio G
as follows:
"Presidio, Texas, Aug. 19.-Y. B(
illas, Ambassador of Mexico, Wa
ington, D. C.: Colonel Langhorne ;
forms me that the lost American av
Itors landed near Falomir station wh
airplane remains. They were tak
prisoner by 20 Villsta bandits w
took them ove4 the mountains n
Cuchillo Parado toward San Anto
and Pilares, state of Chihuahua.
"Jesus Renteria, chief of the ba
demanded $15,000 ransom which
taken by Kilpatrick from Candela
Tex., where the aviators remain
identify the bandits. Colonel La
horne informs me that Americ
troops will cross boundary Ain pi
suit to avail themselves of the o
portunity of capturing the bandits a
for no other purpose.
"As General Pruneda is making I
pursuit, I have notified Colonel La
horne so he may obtain the return
his forces, to avoid difficulties. Plea
obtain such an order from the 4
partment.
"Cosine Bengoechea,
"Consul of Mexico.'
Approved Entry at First
Earlier in the day war departm
officials indicated there was a cle
understanding between the' Mexic
and American .military authorities:
garding the punitive expedition an
message from General Dickman
this subject seemed reassuring.
"Mexican consul at Presidio, a
General Pruneda at Ojinaga," Genes
Dickman wired, "were notified of C
intended pursuit of the bandits at
o'clock, and their co-operation as
this morning. Later the consul ca
ed me up and said General PrunE
was preparing to leave iwth a foi
in compliance with orders from G
eral Dieguez, translation of which w
sent you yesterday, to look for I
aviators and fallen plane,
'The consul said that General Pr
eda would like to send troops to f

low the bandits after the consul b
been informed of our having obtain
the lost aviators last night, and be
told just where the plane fell w
them and how they were captui
near Coyame and held and taken
mountains opposite Candelaria .
ransom.
Seek to Avoid Clash
"The consul then suggested ti
General Pruneda do not move l
troops at all in order to avoid a
contact between General Pruned
troops and ours, since Pruneda h
(Continued on Pige Four)

Washington, Aug. 20.-Repeal of the
daylight saving act was accomplished
today, the senate voting to sustain
the house in passing the repeal meas-
ure over President Wilson's veto. The
vote was 57 to 19.
The repealof the law which now
takes its place among the very few
which have been passed over a
presidential veto becomes effective
after the clocks are turned back to
normal in October.
It will go down in legislative his-
tory as one of the very few meas-
ures which have been vetoed twice
by a president and became a law aft-
er all by the vote of more than -two-
thirds in both houses of congress.
ANDREW CARNEGIE'S ESTATE
TOTALS 50 MILLION DOLLARS

Each to Determine War
"Second, that the suggestions of
the council of the League of Nations
as to the means of carrying into ef-
fect the obligations of article 10, the
execution of which may require the
use of military or naval forces or
economical measures, can only be car-
ried out through the voluntary sepa-
rate action of each of the respective
governments, members of the league,
and that the failure of any such gov-
ernment to adopt the suggestions of
the council of the league, or to pro-
vide sucr military or naval forces or
economical measures shall not consti-
tute a moral or legal violation of the
treaty.,
"Third, that all domestic and polit-
ical questions relating to the internal
affairs of any government, which is
a member of the league, including
immigration, coastwise traffic, the
tariff and commerce, are solely with-
in the jurisdiction of such govern-
ments, and are not by the covenant
of the League of Nations submitted
in any way either to arbitration or
to the consideration of the council or
assembly or the League of Nations,

New York, Aug. 20.-Andrew Car-
negie left an estate estimated at
about $50,000,000, according to a
statement made today by one of the
executors of his will. The balance
of his vast earnings of half a billion
dollars had been disposed of by him
before he died.
Only a score of relatives and
friends are mentioned in the docu-
ment, which consists of less than 5,000
words. It will be offered for pro-
bate next week.
The will was drawn by lawyers of
the Home Trust company, an organi-
zation formed by Mr. Carnegie some
years ago.
Wireless 9perators' Strike Called Off
Port Arthur, Ont., Aug. 20. - The
threatened strike of wireless opera-
tors has been called off. The Marconi
wireless telegraph company has
granted its operators a board of con-
ciliation to adjust wage grievances.
Secretary Crewson of the Great Lakes
Wireless association began negotia-
tions with the company today.

Lieut. Edward Fry, '21, is visiting
friends in Ann Arbor while on a
leave of absence from Washington.
Fry enlisted in the navy in 1917 as
a seaman and after preliminary
training was assigned to the U. S. S.
Iowa. He was captain of the Iowa's
baseball team which won the cham-
pionship of the fleet.
In the spring of 1918 Fry went to
an officers' training school and re-
ceived his commission as ensign. Since
then he has risen to the rank of se-
nior lieutenant and for a time was
an aide to Admiral Benson. Fry ex-
pects to receive his discharge from
the navy within the next month so as
to return to school in the fall.
MINISTERIAL SINGING PARTY
INTERRUPTED BY STUDENTS
Chicago, Aug. 21. - Two hundred
ministers, attending a summer ses-
sion of the Garrett Biblical institute,
participated in a sunrise hymnal con-
cert Tuesday at the quadrangle,
Northwestern university. There were
interruptions from a number of stu-
dents in the fraternity houses, in-
terruptions said to have not been
"real nice."
118 Russians Nabbed in Ohio as Reds
Youngstown, 0., Aug. 20.-One hun-
dred and eighteen Russians are held
in the county jail today as the result
of a raid by federal officials last night
on an alleged bolshevist meeting in
East Youngstown.

Aug.
coffee.
Aug.
eggs.
Aug.
eggs.
Aug.
eggs.
Aug.
butter.
Aug.

15-Detroit, Mich.,
15-Detroit, Mich.,
15-Detroit, Mich.,

15-St. Louis, Mo., 2,000 bags

15-Detroit, Mich., 3,000 lbs.
15-Chattanooga, Tenn., 2,268,-

000 eggs.
Aug 16-Chattanooga, Tenn., 4,800,-
000 eggs.
Aug. 16-Chattanooga, Tenn., 5,000,-
000 eggs.
Aug. 16-Kansas City, 100,000 lbs,
beans.
None of this food has been placed
on the market yet, the attorney gen-
eral explained, and cannot be until
proper court proceedings are com-
pleted.
KIN URGE ILLINOIS SOLDIERS
BE RETURNED FROM RUSSIA
Washington, Aug. 20.-A delegation
from Chicago, bearing petitions signed
by 100,000 relatives and friends of
4,000 Illinois men now serving with
the American 'forces in Russia, called
at the White House today to urge that
the troops, composing the Twenty-
seventh and Thirty-first infantry reg-
iments be' returned home immediate-
ly. The visitors did nrot see the
president, but Secretary Tumulty said
he would make an engagement for
them later.

6,000,000
4,560,000
2,300,000

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