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August 20, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1918-08-20

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'IMES A WEEK
X. No. 24

L

tt rrt THEONLY OFFICIAL
SUMMER NEWSPAPER

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, AUGUST 20, 1918

PRICE THREE CENTS

i

MRS DBAFTINC
OIECESTUDENTS
toroughly Undemocratic," Says
ecretary of War Baker to House
Committee /
Y DETAIL MEN FOR TRAINING
Washington, August 19.-Declaring
nself against exemption of college
idents as a class under the proposed
w draft bill Newton D. Baker, sec-
ary of war, told the House commit-
3 on military affairs today that he
lieved any such exemption would
"thoroughly undemocratic." He
licated, however, that all or part of
e college students might not be tak-
immediately into active service, by
ting that youths drafted and re-
ned in colleges for training would
put in uniform.
In extending the draft ages, Secre-
'y Baker said, suspension of acad-
ic education is an "unsolved prob-
e" of the situation and that it would
most unfortunate to have all col-
iate education stopped. He be-
ved there still would be many
uths left at school, but was against
emption of college students as a
tss, as "thoroughly undemocratic."
Keep Technical Training
Scientically trained experts, how-
er are needed and education of such
my,'sust be continued to an extent.
m injured in the war will be sent
colleges after they recover, the
cretary explained, and thus to some
tent fill up academic institutions.
Regarding present exemption of
eological students, he said, their
aft for Army chaplains is being
ged.
The department's plans, Mr. Baker
id, are to call all the younger men
,l e middle of next year-but sub-
Qntially after the school year is
rough.
Gen. Crowder interjected that the
w program is expected to raise
00,000 men by June 30, 1919, and
at 'it is proposed to call 2,000,000
n by that tinge.
Plans for continuing the education
youths between the ages of 18 and
years inclusive after they have
en registered under the draft law
.d while they are waiting to be call-
into the service are being formu-
ted by a committee on education and
ining of the war department. A
t of 359 colleges at which the youths
e to undergo military training has
ready been prepared. At these
hoots they can become candidates
r particular positionsi n the army
Red to their qualifications.
Wilson Favors Colleges
President Harry B. Hutchins has
ceived a letter from the American
uncil of Education which encloses
letter from President Wilson to
'anklin K. Lane, secretary of the in-
rior. In this letter the president de-
ares that "nsofar as the draft law
.11 permit, there should be no falling
fin attendance in elementary
hools, high schools, or colleges.
ie letter in full follows:
"My dear Mr. Secretary: I am pleas-
to know that despite the unusual
rdens imposed upon our people by
e war they have maintained their
hools and other agencies of educa-
m so nearly at their normal effi-
ency. That this should be contin-
d throughout the war and that, in
far as the draft law will permit,
ere should be no falling off in at-

ndance in elementary schools, high
hools or colleges, is a matter of the
ry greatest importance, affecting
th our strength in war and our na-
(Continued on Page Four)

Newberry Hall
Not to be Opened
In order to save money to be used
in war work Newberry Hall will be
closed this year and the Y. W. C. A.
will be moved to Lane Hall. The Y.
M C A. and the Y. W. C. A have de-
cided that their work can convenient-
ly be carried on in the same build-
ing, thus saving the expense of heat-
ing and of janitor service for New-
berry Probably more than $1,000, the
approximate cost of coal for the
building, can be used for war work
possibly in the overseas canteen serv-
ice. The present plan is to move the
"Y" offices into the basenent so that
the Y. W. C. A. may occupy the ground
floor, but no absolutely definite ar-
rangements have been made as yet.
WILL CONTINUE SPECIAL
WAR RFINC COURSE
Women Do so Well It Is Decided to,
Offer Course in 'Regular
Session
On account of the success of the
drafting course offered to the women
of the University this summer, the
same course will be given in the fall.
The course has lasted eight weeks, the
girls putting in seven hours every
day. An eight and a 16 weeks' course
will be given next semester, in the
last eight weeks a course in descrip-
tive geometry being added.
Professor Goulding said yesterday
afternoon that every one of the 40
girls now taking the course were do-
ing passing work, and that they would
be fully prepared to take a position in
any of the leading drafting rooms of
the country. Many of the girls had
not had any of this work before en-
tering the course. "The girls grasp
the idea, and learn to use their in-
struments, in many cases more quick-
ly than the boys," stated Professor
Goulding. Several good paylg posi-
tions have been taken by some of the
girls who were advanced in the work.
Many positions in drafting are open,
and girls wanting to serve their coun-
try and to obtain good employment are
advised to elect the course.
GOVERNMENT MAY KEEP ALL
ACCOUNTANTS OUT OF ARMY
Washington, D. C., Aug.. 20. - Ex-
pert accountants have become so es-
sential to the wartime program of
tax collections that the government is
considering some step to prevent
their being taken for army service,
and to enroll them in a big volunteer
service similar to that being estab-
lished for physicians. There are only
about 2,500 certified public account-
ants, and 5,000 junior accountants in
the United States. Internal Revenue
:Commissioner Roper's program for
collecting $8,000,000,000 of taxes next
year calls for employing more than
1,000 of these in government service.
No More Carlisle Elevens
The University of Pittsburgh ex-
pected to open the season on the grid-
iron with the Carlisle Indians Oct. 5,
but because the famous Pennsylvania
institution has been closed the red
men will not indulge in the game.

Many other colleges had games
schedules with Carlisle, Including the
Army, Lafayette, Bucknell, Holy
Cross, and Georgetown.
Saturday night there will be mov-
les-"Selfish Yates," featuring William
S. Hact.

THE PHI DELTA PHI FRATERNITY HOUSE WHICH WILL PROB-
ABLY BE USED THIS WINTER BY UNIVERSITY WOMEN AS A DOR-
MITORY, MOST OF THE CHAPTER BEING 4N SERVICE

Women May GeltD1CIEN IIE
Fratenity ouse BY RECIONAL DIRECTORS
To provide additional housing for
women to enter the University this Inspect Work and Talk Over Plans for
fall it is very probable that the Phi Future; No Radical Changes
Delta Phi fraternity house will be Expected
turned over to University women to
be used as a ormiory. Dean of Two government regional directors
Women Myra B. Jordan said yester-
day that there was foundation for the of education visited the University
rumor, and one of the promineest today in connection with the work of
alumni of the fraternity admitted that the training detachment. Dean Wood-
it was a probability, worth of Lewis Institute, Chicago, di-
Being a legal fraternity and com- rector of educational work for this
posed of older men the chapter has regioroanducroS..BorustI-
beencomletly ipe ou bytheregion, and Prof. S. S. Bogardus, In-
been completely wiped out by the
war. All but two or three who were diana State Normal School, Terre
rejected because of physical disabili- Haute, Ind., were here to consult with
ty now hold commissions in various University authorities regarding fu-
branches of the service. Unless util- ture work of the detachment.
ized in some way for war purposes the The visits, it is thought, will not re-
house will undoubtedly be closed this sult in any great innovations, as the
winter work of the local staff is recognized as
The housing problem for women is being the equal of any in other schools.
serious this year. More applications Dean Woodworth concerned himself
have been received for 'the dormito- with the plans for the actual training
ries than can be satisfied, due, it is of the men to serve as motor me-
thought, to the unnatural conditions chanics and telephone electricians,
prevailing on the campus, which have and Prof. Bogardus with their in-
caused many women to seek the Uni- struction in the underlying causes of
versity dormitories. Turning the fra- the war, and the aims of the United
ternity house into a women's dormi- States in carrying it on. Professors
tory would help meet these additional E. W. Dow, Arthur Lyons Cross, and
applications. A. E. Boak, and Mr. V W Crane have
The house is one of the newest on been conducting these classes for pre-
the campus, and one of the largest vious detachments
and best equipped. Many women could The motor mechanics started work
be accommodated there under the yesterday in the shops, but the sig-
most desirable conditions. nal corps will not begin its techni-
cal training until next Monday. By

F
r
f
y

WINS 1LADCE1,SDABE
Of PPTNTMVENIS
Seventy Applicants Through Unver-
siles Accepted at Camp Gordon
School
VIC PATTENGILL ENTERS CAMP
Seventy of the approximately 150
successful applicants from Michigan
for the Central officer's training school
at Camp Gordon, Ga., applied through
the University of Michigan, and the
majority of them are University of
Michigan men. They will report Sep-
tember 1, and the prescribed course of
training is for four months.
Several of the men who applied
through other state schools' for admit-
tance, and were accepted, also, claim
Ann Arbor as their college town. Vic-
tor R. Pattengill, famous Michigani
half back who every fall makes a pil-
grimage back to help Yost with the
team and to make pep speeches at
mass meetings, applied through Mich-
igan Agricultural college at Lansing,
and was accepted.
The states of Georgia, Alabama,
Tennessee, Florida, Kentucky, South
Carolina, Ohio North Carolina, Illinois,
and Michigan are represented. All
applications were received through
universities or colleges. The names
of the men who will represent the
University of Michigan are as fol-
lows
James I. Wansick, Wilmar C. Har-
ris, Raymond D. Smith, Ream C.
Locker, Charles L. Dibble, Harold J.
Carmody, John Uddye, Howard H.
Jackson, J. King Hartess, Mortimer
C. Nichols, F. R. Clark, Paul A. Di-
martino, Thomas I. Berman, Arthur
B. Karwin, John L. Loell, Vincent P.
Hewitt, Charles A. Harrison, B. L.
Packer, N. D. Butler, Edward Speyer,
Charles Spahr, Lee B. Strifling, James
D. Lee, Walter F. Stevens, Clifford E.
Carr, Ward S. Vandensen, Herbert W.
Kellogg, Benjamin D. Jenning, C.
Bruce Strong, Lester R. Weaver,
Joseph A. Stifter, Glenn R. Empson,
Edward J. Rintzmann, Walter E. Der-
ry, Francis L. Johnson, Howard C.
Hawkins, Allen Morsman, Benjamin
S. Williams, Christ. Rosendale, Archie
J. Loose, James A. Griggs, Fred W.
Dennis, Jr., Charles N. Hoffman Jno
A. Course, Ferry H. Ball, Harry E.
Schaller, Le Roy W. Halliday, Samuel
L. Gilbert, Garfield A. Nicholas, J. J.
Auamski, E. E. Eady, Glenn E. War-
ner, Elmer M Dygert, Lucius D. Fos-
ter, Henry C. Varnum, James W. Er-
rant, Irving Long, James A. Dillon,
Thomas Gray, Jr. Harry M. Barris-
field, Myles F. Muir, Sam E. Batser,
Martin L. Sullivan, Harold E. Stoll,
Herbert H. Shant, William R. Rey-
nolds, Ewing L. Carroll, Arthur 0.
Weedfall, Robert J. McMillan, Fred A.
Cowley.
FOUR DETACHMENT MEN
SENT TO OFFICER'S CAMP
Four men from the training de-
tachment have been appointed to the
Infantry Officers' training camp at
Camp Lee, Va., where they will re-
ceive three months' training. They
are: Floyd Masset, Toledo, Ohio; Burl
E. Ott, Owosso; G. W. Fistler, St.
Johns, and G. D. Redman, Paris, 111.
W E Drake and Joseph W. McShan-

nock of Detroit pave been detailed
back to war munitions plants in De-
troit. This is in pursuance of the pol-
icy of the government to furlough ex-
pert workmen back to positions in
which they are already rendering val-
uable service.

Dean Cooley Made
RegionalDirector
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the en-
gineering college has been made re-
gional director of the student army
training corps with authority over the
corps to be established in colleges and
universities in Michigan, Indiana, and
Wisconsin. There will be between 50
and 60 schools under his jurisdiction.
The country has been divided into
twelve districts, with a director for
each district. Each of these directors
is responsible to R. C. Maclauren, di-
rector of college training, who holds
his position under the war depart-
ment commission on education and
special training. It is to one of these
district directorships that Dean Cooley
has been appointed.
Y. W. C. A TEA ROOM TO MOVE
TO QUARTERS IN LANE HALL
Beginning September 1, the Y. W. C.'
A. tearoom will be open to the public
in Lane Hall. It will continue under
the management of Miss Schaible, who
is a graduate in domestic economy at
Illinois university Chubb's and Free-
man's boarding houses will be closed
until the opening of the University.

that time the University hopes to
have sufficient instructors mobilized,
and full equipment on hand so that
the signal corps men can begin. In
the interval, however, they will be
drilled on Ferry field, and also later
in the week may be given buzzer
practice.
Monday night was stunt night at
the Y tent. An interesting program
was given by several of the men.
IDENTIFIES CHELSEA WRECK
VICTIM AS GEORGF WILLIAMS
The body of the man remaining
unidentified since the D. U. R. wreck
at Chelsea on the night of July 20
was identified yesterday as that of
George Williams of Morley, Mich. He
had been on the way to Ann Arbor
to work for a contractor by the name
of Baldwin. He was traced by means
of letters in his coat, which was dis-
covered by matching a piece of his
trousers. The body was buried Au-
gust 13, and identification was accom-
plished by means of photographs. The
body was disinterred and shipped
yesterday to his home.
Friday night there will be several
boxing and wrestling matches at the
tent.

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