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July 27, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1918-07-27

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TIMES A WEEK

LL

THE ONLY OFFICIAL
Uinlu rirwSUMMER NEWSPAPER

IX. No. 14 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 27, 1918 PRICE THREE CENTS

GUNERTURRANSED
BYDIACIMENI
Talented VIsiting Artists Will Assist
in Presenting Program Next
Tuesday Night
MEN'S GLEE CLUB WILL, SING
Men from the detachment will give
a concert Tuesday night at 8 o'clock
in Hill Auditorium. They will be as-
sisted by several professional artists
including Miss Frances Ingram, a
famous contralto from the Chicago
opera company; Mr. Robert R.
Dieterle, '18, an Ann Arbor favorite;
Mr. Eddie MacGrath, a noted Detroit
singer; Mr. Dick Whiting, a famous
composer of popular songs; and Mr.
William King, violinist and concert-
miaster of the Detroit symphony or-
chestra.
Under the direction of Mr. Kreiger,
of company C, and Mr. Gillespie, of
company B, the boys are progressing
rapidly in their glee club work. They
will render several selections next
Tuesday night. Mr. Kreiger is in
charge of the music, and Mr. Gillespie
will care for the business end.
The artists have donated their ser-
vices. The military men, both from
the navy and from the army, who are
in, or near Ann Arbor, are given a
special invitation to attend the con-
cert. The public is invited to attend'
A small admission of 25 cents and 50
cents will be charged. The tickets
are on sale at Moe's furnishing store,
Grinnell Bros. Music House, Henry &
Co:, and the Quarry Drug Co.
SCHOLARSHIPS ARE
GIVEN TO WOMEN
Under the provisions of the gift
made to the University by the Hon.
L. L. Barbour, of Detroit, for scholar-
ships for Oriental women, the follow-
ing were awarded by the committee
yesterday: Matsui Matsumoto, Japan;
Ah-Lan-Giang, China; Yaiko Katsui-
zumi, Japan; Elizabeth Yueh Ying
Cheer, China; Helen L. Wong, China;
Lna Tsai, China; Yuki Osawa, Seattle.
UNION MEETING OF CHURCHES
AND Y. M. C. A. ON CAMPUS
There will be a Union meeting of
churches and the army Y. M. C. A.,
Sunday night at 8 o'clock, at the "Y"
tent. -r. Raymond Huston, D.D., of
the Trumble Avenue Presbyterian
church, Detroit, will deliver a special
talk on his experiences while in the
Y. M. 0.,A. work on the Mexican bord-
er. Mr. Huston has spent the greater
part of the last year in this work.
Special music has been provided by
the Y.M .C. A. detachment. The pub-
Io is invited to attend.
Girls Wanted for Music Club
All girls in the summer school or
in the School of Music who can play
the mandolin, the guitar or the uke-
lele are asked to meet at the . W.
C. A. in Newberry all on Monday
afternoon at 4 o'clock. Those who
cannot come are askedkto 'phone the
secretary sometime during the day.
35c
At
SHEEHAN'S
WAHR'S

SLATER'S
STUDENT SUPPLY
STORE

TO ENTERTAIN MEN
FROM DETACHMENT
An entertainment for the men of
the Detachment will be given by tal-
ent from the Women's league of the
University. The date is undecided
but the place will be Barbour gym-
nasium.
The program will consist of two or
three one-act plays, musical numbers,
and whatever else the league finds
practical. Prof. John R. Brumm will
direct the entertainment.
Tryouts from among the women of
the University are asked to report at
4 o'clock Monday at Barbour gymna-
sium. Those who can contribute
special numbers are asked to be pre-
pared to give the committee an idea
of the nature of their contribution.
CEDMANY kIOOLD LUKE
ID0"PODIECI"POLAND
Seeks to so Rearrange Boundaries of
Smaller States as to Cause
Internal Trouble
To rearrange 'the boundary lines of
the small states, Livonia, Esthonia,
Lithuania and the Ukraiie so that at
least two nationalities would be in
eaci country and so create continual
dissatisfaction and need of protection
by some powerful state is the idea
that Germany would like to enforce
after the war, said Prof. S. J. Zowski
in his lecture on "The Polish Question
and the War" at 5 o'clock yesterday
afternoon in the Natural Science Aud-
itorium. Germany also fancies a strip
of territory running east from the

25,000 WOMENWANID
Will be Used Principally in This Coun-
try to Relieve Nurses for
Service in France
-Because of the government's call
for 25,000 graduate nurses for war
service in France the demand through
the Red Cross for the same number.
of women to train for work in civilian
and army hospitals in this country is
very urgent. Therefore a national
campaign beginning July 29 and con-
tinuing until August 11, will be waged
to enroll women to fill the need. The
city Y. W. C. A. will be open every
evening, and Foster's Art Store every
afternoon from 1 to 5 o'clock to take
enlistments. A trained nurse will be
present to answer the questions for
those who want msore information
about the work before making a final
decision. Army and civilian hospitals
will be used as training quarters after
the students have passed an elemen-
tary course.
Education Not Required
Intelligent, responsible women be-
tween the ages of 19 and 35 are want-
ed. Although a college education or
special scientific trainipg is a great
asset, and will entitle extra credit,
they are not absolute requirements.
Women may enroll themselves in
any of these three different ways:
First, enlisting to hold themselves
in readiness until April 1, 1919, to ac-
cept assignments to nurses training
schools. These women will be sent
to the schools as fast as the vacancies
occur. Those of superior . qualifica-

,CONDOCTOR GIYN
BLAME FORB IECK
Coroner's Jury Finds N. Walter Buick
Should have3 tade Certain Car
Had Passed
PROSECUTOR EXAMINES TUESDAY
Responsibility for the interurban
wreck a week ago tonight at Chelsea
in which 13 persons were killed and
many injured was last night placed
on N. Walter Buck, of Jackson, con-
Steve Farrell, Michigai track coach, ductor of the freight car, by the
who has accepted a commission as coroner's jury. The text of the ver-
first lieutenant in the Sanitary corps, dirt was that the collision was "caus-
leaves next week for Menbs, N. J., to ed by the crew of the express car not
condition aviators. He has turned out waiting for the second section to
ma y chanpionship teams for the pass,t and that it was thesoleaduty
Mlaize and Blue, end developed sonie of the man in charge of the car "to
'of the greatest athletes who ever see and know that the section had
donned track costume. passed."
Both Buck and Charles Fisk, motor-
man, although under arrest on charg-
es of felonious killing, waived their
constitutional rights to refuse to testi-
fy and gave their testimony. They
ID C O Oagreed that the first section whistled
when it arrived at Chelsea that an-
uichi an's Famous Track Coach Given other car was following, and that Fisk
Commission as Lieutenant in answered that he understood. Then
Sanitary Corps unknown to the freight crew the first
section of the passenger stopped at

present Prussian boundary to the lions wiii bs given preference.
Dnieper river in Russia. This would Second, as desiring to become can-
permit the reorganization of the Pol- didates for the Army Nursing School,
ish kingdom without a single seaport recently established by authority of
surrounded on three sides by Prus- the War Department, with branch
sia and on the east by Russia. Such schools in selected military hospitals.
a state of affairs would probably lead Third, as engaging to hold them-
to another war in about 50 years. selves in readiness until April, 1919, to
What Poland wants most is the re- accept assignments to either a civilian
vival of her kingdom on nearly the training school or the Army nursing
same boundaries as before the first school. Those who so enroll will be
partition. The bit of territory between called when the first need arises. The
the northeastern Polish boundary and Government hopes that a majgrity of
the Baltic provinces which was orig- those who enroll will thus put down
inally settled by a band of Prussian their names or both. -
knights is so thoroughly German that Women Are Classified
the Polish wish that to be an inde- The enrollment card will indicate
pendent country. They realize it two classes of registrants, preferred
could never be successfully absorbed and deferred. The .preferred class
by them, and if Prussia should have will be those who accept assignment
it she would very likely try to join to whatever hospital the government
her two parts, thus stealing the only sends them, although preferences will
Polish seaport. be given all possible consideration.
Regarding Lithuania and the Uk- The deferred class is composed of
raine, Poland wishes them to be in- those who limit their pledge of ser-
dependent, but with a definite under- vice. Those who register in this class
standing between them and herself will be assigned only after the pre-
to prevent possible German agression. ferred class is exhausted.

1
E
f
i
1

Michigan has lost one of her trio of
great coaches in the enlistment of
Steve Farrell, track coach, in the
Sanitary corps. He will leave next
week for Menola, N. J., where he will
condition aviators, and be gone for
the remainder of the war. He holds a
commission as first lieutenant.
Farrell has been track mentor for
the Maize and Blue since 1912, and
now is recognized"as among the great-
est of track coaches, if not the great-
est. His teams have won consistently
and been recognized as champions of
the west, and no eastern review of
national track is ever complete with-
out a comparison of the best of the
east with Farrell's proteges. This
year he won both the indoor and out-
door championships of the west, near-
ly doubling the points of nearest
teams. It was unfortunate that we
should have been unable for financial
reasons to send the team to the East-
ern intercollegiates as Michigan was
recognized as favorite.
Up until 1916 Farrell was also
trainer for the football team. Harry
Tuthill, trainer for the Detroit Tigers,
then took over the job and Farrell
was left free to devote all of his time
to track. Tuthill is also now in ser-
vice and Michigan is left without a
football trainer. Athletic Director
Philip Bartelme said yesterday that
another would be secured.

Chelsea for a short interval before
leaving.
Mistook First Section
The freight crew was unloading and
loading at the freight house, which
stands between the siding and the
main line. The only way they had of
knowing that a car passed was by the
noise and by seeing it leave the sta-
tion. They were handling steel and
the noise interfered with their
hearing a car pass, and when the first
section pulled out after its halt at
Chelsea, Buck saw it leaving and
thought it was the second. A few
minutes later he gave the order to
run out on the main line.
Motorman Taylor Testifies
Harold G. Taylor of Detroit, motor-
man on the passenge4 car, gave a
vivid account of how he saw the
freight car ahead through the gather-
ing dusk, of how he couldn't realize
for the instant that it was really an-
other car approaching, and then how
he threw off the power, jammed on the
brakes, and jumped, taking care that
he didn't strike a telegraph pole. As
he hit the ground he heard the cars
crash together.
Additional testimony was given by
Frederick Peppler, train despatcher,
by the man assisting in handling the
reight, and by several people who hap-
pened to be passing at the time of the
wreck. Assistant County Prosecut-
ing Attorney Leslie W. Lisle, will con-
duct his examination at 7:30 o'clock
next Tuesday.
Hindu to Speak Sunday Night
Mr. N. R. Chavre, a special engin-
eering student in the university, will
give an illustrated talk Sunday night
at 6:30 o'clock at the Wesleyan guild.
The subject that Mr. Chavre has se-
lected is "India of Use Indians." Mr.
Chavre is a Hindu, bin home is at
Shahupuri Rolhapur, India. The pub
lie is invited.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Streets
10:30 TOMORROW
LEONARD A. BARRETT SPEAKS
PRAYER AND THE WAR
Summer School Students Invited

THE SUMMER SCHOOL 35c
SHEEHAN'S
D.IRECTORY A
WAHR'S
NOW ON SALE SLATER'S
STUDENT SUPPLY
Subscription receipts may be redeemed at the Wolverine Office Only STORE

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