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July 23, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1918-07-23

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PAGE TWO
Sbe WoIverine
Official student newspaper for the
summer session of the University of
Michigan. Issued Tuesday, Thursday,
and Saturday afternoons.
Advertising rates-Furnished upon ap-
plication to the business manager.
Office hours: Managing editor, 1:00 to
2:00 o'clock; business manager, 11
to 12 oclock, daily.
Address, The Wolverine, Press Build-
ing, Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.
Russell Barnes-Managing Editor
Phone 2414 or 319
Agnes L. Abele-Business Manager
Phone 960 or 1892
Editorial
James C. J. Martin.......
.. .....Detachment Editor
Louise A. Irish ...... Women's Editor
Paul A. Shinkman ........ Dramatics
Cordelle Kemper ..............Music
Reporters
Mary Rhodes Naomi Bradley
N. A. Gleason Herbert Hobart
Jeanette Kiekenveldt
Business
William Wachs ............Assistant
TUESDAY, JULY ;3, 1918
SUMMER BASEBALL
An attempt has been made by stu-
dents on the campus to organize a
summer school baseball team. Such
a'team was organized and played one
game at Ypsilanti. It was beaten.
The attempt to put such' a team in
the field is laudable. There Is no
reason why the University shouldn't
be represented during the summer on
the diamond, as there are plenty of
good players on the campus, and an
excellent place to play.
1f..such a team is organized; how-
ever, iSt should practice and do all in
its power to make it a fit representa-
tive of the University of Michigan.
We have an athletic record second to
nopne in the country, and the teams
we send out to uphold it should be
the best possible teams we can get
together. Specifically, we had a
bseball team this spring that won
the championship of the West, and
was claimant to the championship of
the country.
It is not fair to this tem, and to
the other great baseball teams that
have gone out before and won cham-
pionships, that their records should be
placed next to that of a nine collect-
ed hurriedly to play games with
teams that orinarily are not placed
in the same class athletically. There
are always too many boasters ready
to say they "played on a team that
beat Michigan;" or "I was with the
Ypsilanti Normal club that defeated
the Wolverines, the year they were
champions of the West." It is not
fair to the teams and the University.
We believe the University is ready
to stand loyally behind any team that
is willing to work, and put the old
Michigan fight into their game. That
fight is not present in a team that
does not practice. Michigan fights
with every ounce of'strength, clean-
ly, but just as hard as hard work and
long training will help a team to
fight.
Therefore, if the team we have on
the campus at present is to represent

the University it should be out prac-
ticing regularly. The Ypsilanti team
that defeated it, as result of our *er-
rors a week ago Saturday, does prac-
tice regularly. It is coached by a
paid man. If we are to compete
against such a team we must prac-
tice just as hard. If the team we
have does not care to practice, It
should not go down to Ypsilanti as
representing the University of Michi-
gan. Without a doubt if the team will
do its part towards making it a fit
representative of the University the
campus wIll stand behind. If it, how-
ever, does not care to accept the re-
sponsibility, there ,is no reason why
it shouldn't play anyway. It need
merely take some other name.

THE WOLVERINE

---

DUTCH PUBLISH CONVOY
EPISODE IN "WHITE BOOK"
The Hague, July 23. - A Dutch
white book regarding the convoy to
the East'Indies, has just been pub-
lished and reveals that the convoy
actually sailed with German dye-
stuffs, to which Great Britain object-
ed, and it was recalled.
When Holland saw that if the dye-
stuffs remained aboard the convoy
would be stopped by British war-
ships with the inevitable result that
the commander of the convoy would
offer armed resistance, the Dutch
government resolved to discharge this
portion of the cargo.
WILLARD TO BE ON
RUSS COMMITTEE
Daniel Willard, president of the
Baltimore and Ohio, is said to have
accepted a place on the committee of
business men selected by the presi-
dent to aid in the Russian situation.
New Y. M. C. A. Tent
The Y. M. C. A. tent has been en-
- rged by the addition of a new sec-
tion. The carpenters of the detach-
ment have built a couple of book cases
and have also enlarged the reading
tables since this addition has been set
up. The Victrola in the "Y" tent was
donated by the University Music Store
sn Maynard street, instead of the Uni-
versity School of Music, as was pre-
viously announced.

PHASES OF WAR
LECTURE TOPICS
Different phases of the war are
dealt with in three of the lectures
to be given this week and in two
scheduled for next week.aTomorrow
afternoon Prof. I. L. Sharfman will
lecture on "The War and Economic'
Reconstruction." On Thursday an il-
lustrated lecture will be given by
Prof. H. M. Randall on "Physics ani
the War." This will be in the West
Lecture Room of the Physics labora-
tory, not in the Natural Science audi-
torium as announced. On Friday aft-
ernoon Prof. Zowski lectures on "The
Polish Question and the War," illus-'
trating his talk with lantern slides.
On Tuesday, July 30, Prof. C. O Davis
will speak on "Secondary Educatin
and the War," and on August 1 Miss
Agnes E. Wells gives a talk calledr
"Women and the War."

IETIOIT AND CLEVELAND NAV. daily between Detroit and Buffalo.
CO. LAKE LINES Steamers Western States and Eastern
Railway travelers will find an States operate daily between Detroit
agroeable variation in travel from and Cleveland. p
both Eastern and Western points by
using the D. & C. line from Cleveland ANTED -= Experienced salesman
to Detroit and Buffalo to Detroit and August 15 to Oct. 1. Good personal-
return. Railway tickets are honored ity and a successful record neces-
over these lines. Ask ticket agents to sary. Salary proposition. Give
route them via D. & C. Line steamers. references and experience. Address
The two Giant Steamers of the Great this office.
Lakes, the City of Detroit III and
the City. of Cleveland ,III, operate Subscribe for The Wolverine

in-the water's fine
athing Suits
Nobbiest in the city-Also a supply of
Water Wings and Bathing Caps
UNIVERSITY
WAHR'S BOOK STORE
THE EBERBACH & SON COMPANY
200-204 E. Liberty Street
CHEMICALS, DRUGS, SUNDRIES

ROME DENIES GENERALS ARE
DISMISSED FOR DEFEATS-
New York, July 23. - Recent ca-
ble dispatches announcing that Gen.
(adorna, Gen. Poro and Gen. Capello
had been dismissed from the Italian
army for the defeat on the Isonzo
River, front, last autumn, were dis-
credited Tuesday by Dr. Felico Fer-
rero, director of the Italian Bureau
of Information. The three officers
have been granted leave of absence,
but retain their rank and pay, Rome
reports.; 1

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Always Good Quali

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The Best the Market Affords

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&A-Ilk &A A
-------------------

in the FLESH AND BLOOD with his

Famu

Band

of SIXTY ARTISTS. At the
HILL AUDITORIUM
THURSDAY, JULY 25, 8 P. M.

Special Features
Miss Marjorie Moody .......Soprano
Miss Ruby Helder ..........Tenor
Frank Simon .... . ............Cornet
"For America and Liberty," composed
by Earl V. Moore and Dr. S. L. Davis

America Has Had Many
Band Leaders -But
Only One SOUSA
He is known as the Greatest Band
Man in History, and his band is recogniz-
ed as the Leading Body of Instrumental-
ists in the World.

One Day Only-Thursday, July 25
Prices:-50c, 75c, and $1.00
BUY YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE AND AVOID STANDING IN LINE AT THE BOX OFFICE
Tickets may he had in advance at Waahr's, Tiinker's, Quarry's, Haller and Feller's, and Foster's on State Street; Calkins' and Scott's on
South University; Edison Co., Hutzers, Mills', and Goodyear's Drug Co., en Main Street, Walker's on Miller Ave.; Allmendinger's on Pack.
ard; University Music House on Maynard; and The Arcade Theatre on North University Ave.
FOR BENEFIT OF RED CROSS this space has been contributed by The Busy Bee; Foster's House of Art; Darling & Malleaux; Goodyear
Tire Co.; Cadillac Garage Co.; Schaeberle & Son; Oren's Serve Self; Varsity Toggery Co.; George J. Moe.

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