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July 16, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1918-07-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IS A WEEK

LL

UTHE ONLY OFFICIAL
/ UMRNEWSPAPER

No 9
upy Main Floor at Concert
nesday Night; Harrison
Will Lead
I AND MOORE APPEAR
ethusiasm is being maniest-
e complimentary concert to
Wednesday evening under the
of the University School of'
hen a program unusual in
will be offered; a feature of
11 be the singing of patriotic
the audience under the di-
f Theodore Harrison, head of
department of the School of
1 men in the Mechanics'tcorps
spy seats in the center of
e on the main floor, which
hold for them until 8:05
The general public will be
to " the side sections on the
r and to the balconies.
Practice Yesterday
lay afternoon, through the
of Captain Durkey a sing, was
the band-stand on the sam-
he close of shop practice at
cck. The men were marched
and in a body, 711 strong. A
as placed on the stand and
Harrison lead them in a
'o songs well known to the
and the public at this time.
the soldiers a glee club of
voices many of them of great
e has been organized. They
py places on the stage with
rison, forming a nucleus for
ork. The .words of the songs
hown on the screen.
lition to this phase of the
Robert Dieterle will appear
olo' numbers, while Earl V.
ill contribute a group on the
.cluding his own composition
imes," which will be offered
nse to numerous requests.
ProgramPatriotic
ogram in full is as follows:
inging:
tangled Banner
ttle Hymn of the Republic
I by Theodore Hahhison
a "Zaza". ........Leoncavallo
Robert Dieterle
inging:
he Home Fires Burning
tp Your Troubles
Lad by Mr. Harrison
o in E flat minor .... Parker
it Twilight (request) . .Moore

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 16, 1918

PRICE THREE CENTS

Nechanies Receive [RORS LOSE MICIGAN
First Pay Today M T
Did you see the huge million dol-
lar-looking Pierce Arrow roll into Outhit Teachers 2 to 1, But Blow-up
town last night, and whirl up to the in Pinches; Scheldler Pitches
gymnasium Wasn't it a hummer? .Good Ganie
But, who drove such a beautiful car?
Why no other person than the pay- Although they outhit the Yusilanti
master himself. Normal players almost 2 to 1, the
Yes, pay day is today for the men Wolverines lost their game to the
of the second training detachment. teachers Saturday afternoon at Ypsi-
The payroll was made ttp two weeks lanti 8 to 7. Weird fielding and er-
ago, and the welcome cash is now rors were responsible, as 10 of the
ready for the men. The paymaster latter were credited to Michigan.
expects a run on the bank for an hour Rube Scheidler held Ypsilanti to 8
or so after the clock has struck 2:00. bits, but all but' 3 were pop flies that
Something like $22,000 will be paid should have been gathered in.
out this afternoon to the men in the The teachers started early and
'training detachment. scored in the first inning, through a
For a number of the men t he base on balls and an infield error,
month's pay will be welcomed like a and again in the fourth on a hit and
new baby, or the finding of one's long a pop fly that the short stop mis-
lost brother, for the financial prob- judged. The Wolverines scored 3
bin has been a weighty one for runs in the fourth on a bunt by Coop-
manyBreaches will be jingling with er, a hit by Rychener and a hit by
sounds of coins before the sun reach- Hardie through short-stop, which
es the western horizan. The men scored the first 2 men. Hardie reach-
will be once more re-embursed, and ed the plate on an error and passed
there will be no need, at least for a ball.
small period of time, to sponge on Teachers Take Lead
one's companions for ice cream cone, Ypsilanti regained its lead in the
candy bar, or tobacco money. fifth by scoring 2 more on hits. Mich-
. inneas c aseu uteui agais 3no us sev-

i P

Lieut. Clarence T. Fishleigh, h7E,
former business mnanager of the
Michigan Daily, who has been decor.
ated by the French government with
the Croix de Guerre for "cons icnous
bravery" in the aviation service.
K EARNS PLAYERS CLOSE
SVCCESSFDLENCACEMENI

x

STUDENTS AE INVITEDU
TO VISITOBSERVATORY
Only Chance During Summer; Tick-
ets May Be Obtained at Office of
Summer Sesso n
Tickets for visitors nights at the
observatory are not going fast, and
as the first three evenings this week
will be the only chances offered dur-
ing the entire summer, those inter-
ested should obtain their tickets at
once. One hundred and fifty people
divided into three squads can be han-
dIed each 'evening. Tickets can be
secured by presenting the students'
receipt, at the summer session office.
Weather conditions were so unfav-
orable last night that the large tele-
scope could not be exposed for the
visitors at the Observatory. The
maller apparatus was used to look
at the moon, despite the fact that
the sky was semi-cloudy during the
latter part of the evening. A large
number of visitors were present.
Most Modern
Owing to the distance of the Ob-
servatory from the campus, the great-
er part of the student body does not
realize that it is one of the most mod-
ern in the United States, containing
some of the most perfectly made in-
struments that have ever been in-

igan passed them again in the sev-
enth with two more runs on singles
by Bennet and Robbins, and a two
base hit by Rychener. The infield lost
the lead, however, in the teachers'
half of the inning, by heaving the ball
all over the lot.
Once more the game shifted to
Michigan wien in the eighth hits by
lardii.3i.elidoae seu Beiet scored
two runs. The teachers counted once
in their half of the inning when a
throw-in from the outfield went into
the State Normal bench and allowed
the runner to reach the plate.
Blow-up in Ninth
In the ninth with the score tied
Scheidler struck out the first two
men, and then came the blow-up that
lost the game. Sherman dropped a
fly and pegged through second base
to home. Robbins' peg back to sec-
ond was missed and the runner scor-
ed the winning run.
Ypsilanti will probably play here
Saturday, and a practice was held
yesterday to try to iron out some of
the faults that lost the game Satur-
day. Another will be held Thursday
afternoon, and tryouts are asked to
report at that time.,
Michigan
AB R H PO E
Pilliod, 2b............5 0 0 2 '2

Ibsen and Shakespeare Plays Please
Large Audiences at Saturday
Performances
(By P. A. Shinkman)
Ann Arbor was given its first taste
of Ibsen in some time when the El-
sie Herndon Kearns players present-
ed "The Master Builder" by that au-
thor last Saturday afternoon in the
Campus theater.
George Carleton Sties itt h tWti
role made a decidedly realistic char-
acter of the high-strung, impetuous
"builder of homes," who finds that he
has been forced to sacrifice personal
happiness to a'chieve the goal of
"Master Builder." His interpreta-
tion of the role inspired both sympa-
thy and admiration of Halvard Sol-
ness, the great builder, who finally
makes the supreme sacrifice in the
midst of his life's work.
Miss Kearns as Hilda Wangel
Hilda Wangel, the friend of the
family who forces the Master Builder
to a realization of himself and suc-
ceeds to a certain degree in setting
matters aright, was splendidly han-
died by Miss Kearns, who had only
to be her own self to make the part
a success. Miss Agnes Scott's inter-
pretation of the colorless wife whose
life was ruined as a result of her
husband's ambition, was excellent
and inspired perhaps the greatest
sympathy of all the characters.
The play has a purpose and sets
out immediately to accomplish it.
Although it is far from being as
adaptable to outdoor presentation as
are the plays of Shakespeare, the
staging is adequate. In spite of the
fact that it was perfect attention, the
play is better suited to the confiden-
tial atmosphere of the enclosed thea-
ter and is rather heavy for the aver-
age mid-summer matinee audience.
"The Tempest" Well Played
Shakespeare's "The Tempest,"
which was staged in the evening, is
the ideal outdoor play with its pic-
turesque dancing sprites and fairy-
tale enchantments. Mr. Somnes is a
tall, handsome Prospero, right Duke
of Milan, while Miss Kearns is a.
most engaging Mirando, daughter to
Prospero and living with him on the
enchanted desert isle.
Ecellent work was done by Henley
Edwards in the difficult role of Cali-
ban, a savage ' and deformed slave.
The antics of Trinculo, a jester, and,
Stepheno, a drunken butler, as played
by William Rodmore and George
Hare kept the audience in continuous
laughter in spite of the rather broad!
humor.
Incidental songs and dances, espe-
cially those of Theodora Keene, add-
(Continued on Page Three)

FISIILEICV BEICEIIS
Cited for Bravery on May 30 and 1
While Assisting in a Bombard-
meat
IN 21 BOBblING PARTIES
For executing bombardments from
an airplane under "the most peril-
ous circumstances," Lieut. Clarence
T. Fishleigh, graduate of the Univer-
sity in the 1917 engineering class,
has received the French Croix de
Guerre, according to a letter receiv-
ed yesterday from his brother. Ma-
jor W. T. Fishleigh.
Lieut. Fishleigh had been at the
front for two months and 10 days,
when on May 30 and 31 he participat-
ed in the bombing expedition which
resulted in the following citation
from the French government.
Brings hack Information
"Officer tres brave. Observateur de
valeur. Fait partie de toutes les ex-
peditions de l'escadrille et raporte
chaque fois des reseignements tres
precieux.
"Les 30 et 31 Mais, 1918, a execute
des bombardments dans les circum-
stances les plus perilleuses en defit
les attaques des avions ennemier."
Iieut. Fishleigh has been actively
engagcd in1 t c Us
over the German lines, and has been
working over a large number of the
recent important battlefields at
heights ranging from 1,500 to 4,000
meters.
Was husiness Manager
Duing his last year in the Univer-
sity Lieut. Fishleigh was business
manager of the Michigan Daily, the
regular session newspaper. He left
to attend the first officers' training
camp at Ft. Sheridan, from which he
entered the aerial service as an ob-
server.. He was a member of several
campus societies.
Besides Lieut. Fishleigh the follow-
ing are among the Michigan men
holding decorations fromeither the
United States or French government:
Lieut.. Renville Wheat, J. D. '16, pos-
sessor of the American War Cross,
and Joseph Fee, ex-'1G, Perry Long,
'20, Dr. John Sherrick, '12, '15 M., A.
F. Paley, '17L, and Walter P. West-
rand, '19P, all holders of' the French
War Cross. This list i probably in-
complete ,as an official list can hard-
ly be compiled until after the war.
WAR RISK BUREAU
WANTS VOLUNTEERS
President Harry B. Hutchins has
received a letter from the Bureau of
War Risk Insurance, Washington,
stating that the government needs
immediately the voluner services
of trained college men, preferably
from the faculty or among the grad-
uate students, who would be willing
for a period of two or three months
to help conduct and supervise corre-
spondence with the families of our
soldiers and sailors, and with the
inquirers about the War Risk Insur-
ance Act.
Volunteers would be expected to
come to Washington and serve for a
nominal consideration of $100 per
month, which would probably cover
their expenses. Those interested are
requested to consult with Prof. James

W. Glover, room 405, Mason hall.
Professor Glover will be in his office
from 11 to 12 o'clock daily and will
give further information concerning
the needs of the bureau and the re-
quirements of candidates.

Bennet, cf............5
Robbins, c..........5
Cooper, 3b ..........5
Rychener, rf ... . ..... 4
Goetz, lb ............ 5

1
1
1
1
0

2 1
1 13
2 3
2 1
1 4

1
2
1
0
0

EarlTi V. Moore vented for determining the movement
inging: of the solar bodies.
lere I The smallest of the three domes
a Long, Long Trail - covers the original instrument, a
ead by Mr. Harrison telescope known as the meridian cir-
lower" ...Campbell-Tipton cle, since it is mounted on an east
and His Lute" ......Manny aid west axis. It is used for telling
Mr. Dieterle the time of day. Its diameter is but
inging: 6 1-2 inches, and it can be swung
only in one direction.
ead by Mr. Harrison Driving Clock
In addition to this, sometime later,
F ENGLISH PEOPLES an equatorial refracting telescope
BE SUBJECT OF LECTURE was. added, mounted on a conical
stone foundation. The instrumentl
cture', on "The Unity of the cost about $6,000 and was consider-
peaking Peoples-A Guaran- ed one of the finest in the world at
ace," b y Prof. G. R. Wrong that time, having a driving clock at-
ven at 1 o'clock tomorrow tached to it in such a way that it
in the auditorium of the counteracts the effect of the motion of
cience building. Mention of theearth's rotation on the telescope.
and place of the lecture was It is used for determining the course
a the announcement of sum- of various planets and observing the
on lectures. Professor Wrong heavens in general.
torian of note recognized One of World's Best
at Canada. He has been lec- Under cover of the largest dome is
the United States at the Uni- one of the three finest telescopes in
of Illinois, Wisconsin, and the world, being excelled only by the.
(Continued on Page Three)

Hardie, If ............ 4 2 3 1 1
Dueltgen, 3b ......... 4 0 1 0 2
Scheidler . .......... 4 1 3 2 11
Totals.............41 7 1527 10
State Normal
AR R H PO E
Fox, If.............. 4 1 2 0 0

Ca n , ss.a . . . . . . . . . :. y.0
Crane, s............ 5 0
Schafer, 1b ......... 1 1
Mathews, c..........4 1
Westcott. 2b. ...... 5 1
Oliver, cf .... .... 5 2
Shermar, 3b ......... 5 1
Harris, rf ............ 4 1.
Waring, p .. ....4 0

1 0
1 9
0 15
1 0
1 1
0 1
1 1
1 0

1
0
0
0
0
0

Totals . ............. 41 8 827' 1
Two-base hits Crane, Cooper,
Scheidler, Rychener.
Stolen bases-Cooper, Bennet, Har--
die, Schafer, Oliver.
Double plays-Cooper to Robbins;
Scheitller to Cooper.
Bases on balls - Off Waring, 1;
Scheidler, 3.-
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Michigan . ..... 0 0300220-7
State Normal ..1 0 0 1 2 0 2 1 1-8

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