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July 13, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1918-07-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR THE WOLVERINE
THE DETACHMENT.NEN

MEN BEING CONSIDERED
FOB OFFC[BS SCHOOL
Infantry Officers Go to Camps Lee,
Gordon, and Pike; Artillery
to Camp Taylor
Preparations are being made for
the new officers' training schools, and
the officials of the training detachment
have commenced looking over the men
for possible candidates. As soon as
the qualifications of the men to attend
the schools are made up and definite-
ly decided, the men will be sent to the
different camps.
The future infantry officers of the
detachment will go to Camps Lee,
Gordon, and Pike. The artillery of-
ficers will be trained at Camp Tay-
lor, while the machine gun men will
go to Camp Hancock, Ga.
This is the first time that such an
opportunityhas every presented itself
to men in training detachments
throughout the country. It will mean
that a large number of the men, who
are not stationed with the detachment
In Ann Arbor, and who succeed in
gaining commissions, will probably be
sent back to this city to act as in-
structors and officers of the coming
detachments. Nothing definite regard-
ing the selection or the stationing of
the future officers is as yet known.
There will be a trile more than two
per cent of the entire number of men
in the detachment sent to the different
schools. The government ordinarily
allowed two percent of the detach-
ment, but according to orders receiv-
ed some time ago, this number may be
increased.
The men will be instructed in three
arms of the service, in the field artill-
ery shool, the machine gun school,
and the infantry school. As soon as
the men qualify for the officers' school
they will not have to take the required
studies in the different branches of the
detachment.
Weselyan Guild Holds Party
The Wesleyan Guild will hold a
party at the guild house on Sunday
evening at 6 o'clock. Miss Carrie L.
Dickens will speak. There will be a
social hour from 6 to 6:30 o'clock.
Refreshments will be served. The
public is invited, especially the boys
of the detachment.
Government Inspector Here
Captain James H. Buell, govern-
ment inspector, arrived last night from
Chicago. He will inspect the men of
the training detachment.
Mimeographing and Typewriting.
O. D. Morrill, 322 S. State St. (Over
Baltimore Lunch.)-Adv. 3-tf
Dance at the Packard Academy
next Saturday evening, July 13. Ike
Fischer's orchestra. Dancing 9 to 12.
THE
Farmers & Mechanics
- IBank
SOUTH MAIN STREET
CORNER HURON
STATE STREET OFFICE
830 SO. STATE STREET
A Good Strong Balk With Every Banking Need

Tear Gasiis
MESS SONG
If you don't like your beans or your
hardtack,
If you don't like your dish-water
stew;
No matter where you eat
Your table's always neat
What difference does it make to you
If you don't like the cook in the
kitchen,
If you don't like your mess sergeant,
too,
Then don't kick on the grub you are
getting,
It's Uncle Sam that's feeding you.
SINCE THE interest in the war is
practically equal on all the fronts it
might be advisable for the newspa-
pers to print a daily panorama zone
map, which would take the shape of
an eight col. ribbon.
Drop Drops Mrs. Drop and Small
6 Drops; Dropped Into Jail
(From the Chicago Tribune)
Something dropped in the circuit
court clerk's office yesterday when
Mrs. Mary Drop dropped into drop a
little bill for divorce from John Drop,
present address the bridewell.
According to Mrs. Drop, Drop was
in the habit of dropping just about
everything that was droppable at
Mrs. Drop's head.
Drop is also said to have dropped
language that should not have bten
dropped all over the Drop place. Mrs.
Drop in her bill casually drops the
hint that she would like the custody
of the little Drops and would also like
Drop to drop her a little alimony oc-
casionally.
BY THE TIME Mr. Drop drops out
of jail, drops Mrs. Drop some ali-
mony, and drops the Drop Jrs., he
will probably have dropsy.
No, He Wasn't a eMde
A few days ago a tall individual
stepped into a drug store on State
Street and purchased a three cent
stamp. For some time afterwards
he stood gazing at the stationery, the
drugs, and the cigars. At length he
drawled:
"Vere's the vater to vet this wit?"
Aoy, Page a Dictionary
From the Chicago Tribune)
The Austrians, after having offered
vigiorous resistance in the course of
the preceding days, refired in disor-
der into the Tormorica valley.
SOUNDS LIKE the guns our fore-
fathers used to use against the Red
Skins.
THE GREAT Russian ; mellow
drayma, which is now playing to full
houses in northern Europe, reminds
one of the great American movie ce-
real, "The Miss Tear Ee of the Fe
Cross, or Red, the Blonde Detecka-
tif."
Mixed Dates, or Sour Pickles
The theme of this exciting and
thrilling story is almost unimportant,
but it is about two girls and one of
the men in the training detachment.
Not so very long ago one of the men
invited two girls to come to Ann Ar-
bor and see him. One of them was
from Chi, 'and the other from De-
troit. The Chicago girl arrived first,
and, accordingly, registered at the
Hostess house.
While said man was murmuring

WRITE VISITS SHOPS
AND NOlESIMPHESSIONS
Men of Second detachment Accomplish
More Than Members of First
Training Group
(By H. H.)
When asked how the present de-
tachment compared with the first al-
lotment of soldiers detailed to the Un-
iversity. one of the instructors replied
they were progressing even more sat-
isfactorily than the preceding detach-
ment.
This statement does not mean to in-
sinuate that the men who have left were
less willing or capable to learn. In
fact one of the most impressive char-
arteristics of both detachments is the
intense interest and eagerness of the
men to learn the different trades. This
point is brought out forcibly by com-
paring the work of the student and the
soldier, the latter obtaining almost
without exception a grade attained
only by the exceptional student.
Better Selected Men
The superiority of the present as-
signment is not due to a better spirit
evinced, but, as an instructor explain-
ed, is due to the fact that they have
been better selected for their work.
When the first detachment arrived
they were unclassified as to their best
line of work, and consequently much
time was wasted. This was especially
true with the carpentry squads, for by
the time that each man had been plac-
ed at the job for which he was best
fitted the eight weeks were about up.
Training is Varied
One of the most common miscon-
ceptions concerning the work of the
dettachments at the University is that
,they are all given exactly the same
training. After passing through the
various shops for the first time the
stranger cannot but feel a bit con-
fused at the number of different shops
and the training given in the various
groups. This number of shops is re-
quired, both because of the numerous
groups, each requiring its own partic-
ular training, and also because the dif-
ferent groups have changes in shop
work.
Not only can every bit of mechanism
of the automobile or rifle be construct-
ed or repaired by these men, but also
their carpenters have erected a part
of their own buildings, and it is ex-
pected that more buildings will be built
to accommodate future enlarged de-
tachments.
Shop Work Changed
Typical examples of the changes in
shop work are those of the gunsmiths
and chassis repair men. During the
eight weeks they are detailed to the
University they are given four chang-
es of shop for two weeks in each-the
machine, motor repair, forge, and gun
shops. In a like manner the chassis
repair men are distributed two weeks
,each to ignition, carburetor adjust-
sweet nuttings into the Chi. girl's ear,
the Detroiter breezed in. The host-
ess, knowingly, brought the girl over
to him.
Heavens! What a stare the De-
troiter gave! "Surely this isn't the
man I want to see?" she thought
aloud.
Whereupon, she turned on her O'-
Sullivan heel ,and took the next train
back to the industrial city without
even a howdy to the man sitting on
the couch.
Germanism at Hme

"Beg pardos," asked a medium siz-
ed young woman of the hostess in
charge of the U of M. Hostess house,
"Is this the Hostage house?"
AT THE PRESENT time there has
been a noticeable absence in the war
reports of what Turkey- is doing for
the kaiser. Perhaps conditions will
be more favorable around Thanksgiv-
ing time.

Hostess House
Monday, July 8
James Marsh and family, Mt. Clem-
ens; May Phelps, Coldwater; Mrs. W.
G. Howley, Ann Arbor; Mrs. Foerst,
Ann Arbor; Aileen Benson, Detroit;
Mr. and Mrs. W. B. McMillen, D. W.
Saxton, and Inez Merce.
Tuesday, July 9
Mrs. Hattie Whitney, Flint; W. E.
Fair and James S. Carr, Kalamazoo;
Roy M. Johnson 'and A. Wartemburg,
Detroit; Bernice E. Turk, Coral; Ern-
est F. Berner, Luther; Mrs. Fred D.
Keeler, Detroit; Mrs. C. S. Dudley, Yp-
silanti, and Mrs. Julia Anderson, Al-
pena.
Wednesday, July 10
Solomon Jantzi, Nic Jantzi, and John
Gerber, West: Branch; Mrs. William
Ellwood and Myron Hostetler, Birm-
ingham; Julia Lahaski, Claire Lahn-
ski, Mrs. M. Lahnski, Mrs. S. Rakovan,
Mrs. Joseph Ryduchnowski, and Miss
H. Apple, Detroit.
Thursday, July 11
R. J. Welch, Lawrence; S. Kopon,
Joseph Stuner, Margaret Layree, and
William S. Sayres, Jr., Detroit; Mrs.
Fred Soderquist, Bay City; Florence
S. Shinsky, Saginaw; A. D. Karr, Mar-
shall; Katherine E. Brennan and Mrs.
A. G. Anderson, Grayling.
ment, chassis repair, and motor repair
work.
An interesting feature in the car-
penter shop is the small framework
models of houses that are erected and
torn down tO give practice in joinery.
In building these structures a small
model made by an experienced car-
penter is followed.
Smash Repaired Cars
As the visitor leaves the last of the
shops his curiosity is aroused by a
heavy iron weight of between 400
and 500 pounds lying on the ground.
His curiosity concerning the use of
the weight is satisfied by one of the
attendants, who informs him that aft-
er a car has been put in good running
order, it is driven under this weight,
which is lifted up by a pulley, and al-
lowed to be smashed by the weight.
It is then straightened, repaired, and
put back into running order that it
may again be smashed.

TA[NTEOG PEROH
"oxing, Musical Numbers,
Besides Other Acts, Comp
Contribution
A varied program was tha
ed at the "Y" tent last nig
of Company B. Whether y(
runs to music or to the ma
boxing, there was plenty
you entertainment. Under d
Joe Gillespie, promoter, a
ented band of performers w
bled. They found the stage
tent too small and moved
Barbour gymnasium, where
bouts, musical numbers, and
ents were pulled off.
Here is the program as
ished by the publicity agent
Selections-Peerless quari
Molt, Barber, Swofield).
Card tricks - Wink th
(Tight).
Violin solo-Kubelski (P
Gonzinski (Hartough) at the
Boxing bout-Freddie WE
man) versus Willie Ritchi
at 135 pounds.
Lightning crayon artist-
The village cut-up-Red I
Boxing - Mike Gibbons
versus Packey McFarland (V
165 pounds.
The Great Herman-"The
ician," Addington.
Boxing-Benny Leonard
versus Charley White (Ros
pounds.
The next stunt night prt
be put on next Friday nig
man of Company A.
LEASED LIVES. A Bac
address delivered recently
University of Indiana by
Douglas has been produs
brochure. On sale at the
at 25c.
HELP WANTED-MALE-
money selling specialties
elties during spare time.
tional Specialty Compan
Building, Jackson, Michig
Dancing at the Armory
urday from 9 to 12. Fis
chestra.

THE NEW CATALOGUE
of theU
ilivorsityof Ihi
IS NOW READY
Complete information concerning the eight Colleges and Sc
LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS, El
GINEERING, MEDICINE, LAW, PHARMACI
HOMEOPATHY, DENTISTRY, GRADUATE, AN
THE SUMMER SESSION
Special Courses in Forestry, Newspaper Work, Lan
scape Design, Higher Commercial Education, includir
Railway Administration and Insurance, Architectur
Conservation Engineering, Education (affiliated wit
Ann Arbor Schools for Observation Study), and
Course for those preparing for the scientific administr;
tion of departments of sanitation and public heals;
For Copy of Catalogue, Special Announcement, or Indi
Information, address
The Dean of the School or College in which interested,
SHIRLEY W. SMITH

Save the Pieces
Broken Eye Glass Lenses ground In our own shop, same day
TRY OUR SERVICF. EYES EXAMINED
LET US SHOW YOU OUR.
ARMY AND NAVY FRAMES
You Should Have One
Haller & Fuller State Street jewelers

Secretary University

Ann Arbor, M

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