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June 23, 1914 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1914-06-23

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r

T H E W O L V E R IN E

LITS AND INGINEEIIi HOI ( OPIIN hOUSE WIOlIES ALUMNI
CLASS DAY EXERCISES TO)AY
-latay Moetigs to i Be Held atI Union;
Senior lits and engineers held their ill 1101d1 Dance lriday
annual class day exercises this morn-
ing, the lits between Tappan hall and Although no special functions have
the library, and the engineers behind been planned by the Union for Coln-
the physics building. The lit program mencement visitors, an "open house"
follows: Address by class president, is constantly being held, to wtich all
Waldo Fellows; history, Miss Mar- alumni are invited. Many of the alum-
jorie Nicolson; poem, Reuben Peter- ni meetings will be held in the Union
son; prophecy, Miss Alice, Burridge; rooms, and the cafe will accommodate
oration, Paul B. Blanshard; and pre- any number of visitors.
sentation of memorial, Lester R. The regular weekly dance will be
Rosenbaum. Following is the pro- held this week on Friday instead of
gram of the engineers: president's Saturday, as has been the custom dur-
address, George C. Paterson; history, ing the regular term. Tickets will go
Francis DuBois; poem, Raymond A. on sale at the Union desk Wednesday
Hill; and oration, lester J. N. Keliher. afternoon at 5:00 o'clock at 50 cents
Following the lit program, souvenir per couple. According to an announce-
booklets, containing the entire pro- aent today by P. D. Koontz, '14, presi-
gram and cuts of the speakers, were dent for next year, dances will be held
handed out. Bruce J. Miles acted as every Friday night during summer
chairman of the souvenir committee. session.

Repairing of Eye Glasses a
Specialty
LENSES DUPLICATED
FINE WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING
Haller Jewelry Co.
Telephone 534 303 South State Street
The New Catalogue
OF THE
Ulliversity of Michigall
IS NOW READY
Complete Information concerning seven departments:
Collegiate, Engineering, Medicine,
Law, Pharmacy, Homeopathy,
Dentistry and the Graduate Depart-
ment and the Summer Session.
Special Courses in Forestry, Newpaper
Work, Landscape Design, Higher Commercial
Education, including Railway Administration
and Insurance, Architecture, Conservation
Engineering, Pedagogy (affiliated with Ann
Arbor Schools for Observation Study), and a
course for those preparing for the scientific
administration of departments of sanitation
and public health.
For.Copy of Catalogue, Special Announcement. or
Individual Information, address
SHIRLEY W. SMITH
Secretary University A N N A R B O R

EXERCISES BEGUN
BY BACCALAUREATE
President 1 ltchins elivers Address,
lenuntcing Recall of Judicial
teDecision
DI, ANEL, (IVES StOl T TALK
The aanual week o0 cieremoni s wasa
ushered in Sunday night by the Bacca-
laureate sermon, housed for the first
atiee in Hill auditorium. President
Harry B. I utchins took for the topic
of his address "Wishom is the princi-
pal thing; therefore get wisdom; and
with all thy getting, get understand-
ing." In the course of his talk, he de-
nounced the recall, as applied to judg-
es and judicial decision as "crude,
bungling and unscientific." The speech
was followed by a few words from
President-emeritts lames B. Angell.
"Do not put all of your goods in
the front window; while you will tena-
porarily attract the people, you can-
not long deceive them," said Presi-
dent Hutchins. "Knowledge, in a
practical sense," lie stated, "is to say
and do the right thing at the right
time. This does not depend entirely
upon the learning derived from books,
although this is generally the foun-
dation." lie impressed that upon en-
tering the affairs of the world, the
graduate must first of all have the
proper attitude towards what he has
already done. "If you think you have
done it all here," he commented, "then
you have probably done all you ever
will do."
President-emeritus James B. Angell
argued against the false distinction
between scientific and religious truth.
"All learning and science," he said,
"is, in the proper sense, sacred. The
distinction between sacred and pro-
fane literature is now obliterated."
P'laying by Mr. Earl Moore, a solo
by Prof. William Howland, and music
by a selected choir composed the mus-
feal program. The devotional part
of the program was furnished by Dr.
AT. L. DOoge.
1M. S FIRST TO HOLD EXEIWISES
Iudge Ilary Olson, of Chicago, Gies
Adaress Yesteray
The laws were the first class to
hold class day exercises, giving their
proagramsas ctertday autder teiapantt
Oasi.tiaf Justice Harry loa, of
the Chicago Municipal Court, deliver-
ed the principal address, speaking on
"Somae Problems in the Admiistra-
tion of Justice," in which he pointed
out the efficiency of the Chicago Muni-
cipal Court, and praised the asomeas
and social workers of Chicago for the
argea'p'art tita'cosurt is aosv ilain ha
the betterment of social and moral
conditions of the city.
"Women inspired the Municipal
Court," said Justice Olson, "and witha
their aid justice is easily obtained for
all,. 'he system as used in the Muni-
cipal Court, should become standard
throughoutt the country. Legislatures
should consider the necessity of unify-
ing our courts, so that all matters of
a certain class that occur within the
jurisdiction must be brought before
the same court. Judges thus become
specialists, and can investigate cause
and effect reconciliations. Justice is
tempered with sympathy and mercy."
Verner W. Main gave the class ora-
tion, pleading most effectively for
social service. "Let us not sit in a
corner seat," he urged, "but rather let
us live by the side of the road that we
may be of benefit to all humanity."

The valedictory was delivered by
Herbert. V. Spike and special music
was furnished by Gerald Strong. The
laws will end their festivities with an
informal dinner at the Allenel Hotel
Thursday night.
Calkins Pharmacy for drugs. tf.
We buy peanuts in car loads and
roast daily. Only ten cents for a full
pound. Dean & Co. 1-3.
Clean soda water at Calkins. tf.

OLD BOYS FIGHT
ELEVEN ROUNDS
A triple killing, two home runs, and
nerve racking rallies by both sidest
featured the annual game between the
alumni and Varsity, which Captain
Sisler's men won by a 3 to 2 score in
11 exciting innings last Thursday af-
ternoon on Fery field.
"Red" Campbell pitched exception-
ally brilliant ball for the old timers,
holding the Varsity to six hits; while
Ferguson and Davidson let the Alumni
down with but five singles. In the fin-
al round "Shorty" McMillan, of grid-
iron and diamond fame, booted a
grounder hit by his successor at quar-
terback on the Wolverine eleven,
"Tommy" Hughit and the latter scor-
ed the winning run when Sisler beat
out a hard drive, after Howard had
sacrificed and McQueen had been
whiffed by Campbell.
The alumni tallied their only counts
in the second. Howard's error let
Cory on, and "Norm" Hill singled;
both men later scoring on an error by
McQueen. Michigan's two runs came
as the result of circuit drives, Renton
driving a hit to deep center in the
second, which was not relayed back
to the diamond until Benton had
reached the bench. In the seventh La-
badie also clouted for a round trip.
The Varsity nearly won in the ninth,
when Sisler hit for two sacks with one
down. Labadie grounded to McMillan,
however, who started a double play to
Hill which caught Sisler at the plate.
In the tenth the alumni filled the
paths with none out, but failed to
score. O'Brien singled to start, and
errors by Waltz and Davidson loaded
the corners. J. Campbell lifted a high
fly, which Davidson dropped, but
caught O'Brien at the plate and start-
ed a triple slaughter, the Alumni hav-
ing four men on the paths.
The score:
Innings .1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11-R
Alumni ..0200000 00 0 0-2
Varsity .0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1-3
Home runs-Benton, Labadie; two
base hit-Sisler; stolen bases-How-
ard, Benton; sacrifice hits-Howard,
hill, J. Campbell, Mitchell; struck out
-by Campbell 8, by Ferguson 11 in 6
innings, by Davidson 7 in 5 innings;
first base on balls-off Campbell 1;
wild pitch-Ferguson; passed ball-
Davis; double play-McMillan to Hill
to Dasis. Left on bases-alumni 5,
Varsity 4. Time-2 :24. Umpire-Da-
vis.
COLLEGE END SALE.
Campus Bootery.
308 S. State St. 1-2
Kodaks and supplies at Calkins. tf.
Weymann Mandolutes, Martin Gui-
tars, and Musical Instruments of
every description for sale at reason-
able prices at Schaeberle & Son's
Music House, 110 S. Main St. tf
Full Pound Fresh roasted peanuts,
ten cents. Dean & Co., Ltd., 214 S.
Mai St. 1-3.
COFFEE RANCH.
Coffee and jumbo peanuts roasted
fresh daily. Sold retail at wholesale
prices, also Tea and Cocoa, 211 East
Liberty. 1-6.

SENIOR LAWS SEN) SIX TO
FUNERAL OF ROY G, DAVIS
Delegates Act s tsPall Bearers to
Drowned Student; Class
President Speaks
Six senior law's were sent by their
class to act as pall bearers at the
funeral of Roy G. Davis, of Mineral
Ridge, Ohio, who was drowned when
his canoe overturned in the rapids of
the Huron on Thursday, June 18.
Robert J. Curry, president of the class,
one of the men sent to Davis' home,
delivered a speech at the funeral ser-
vices held in the Methodist Church in
Mineral Ridge on Sunday. The other
pall bearers sent by the class were:
John R. Ober, Allen Andrews, Jr.,
Mark T. Davis, Grady Gamble and
John C. Winter.
Preceding the services at the
church, a short service was held at
the Davis home. Among the many
flowers sent was a large wreath from
the senior law class. The services at
the cemetery following those at the
church, were taken charge of by the
independent Order of Odd Fellows, of
which organization Davis was a mem-
ber.
Davis is survived by a mother and
two sisters. His father was drowned
three years ago last Sunday.
319 E. Huron St. PHONE961-M
Chubb House
209 South state Street
Under the Original Management
Summer Board $4.00
"'TASTES LIKE HOME "
C. S. Chubb Prop.
J. Q. Neeland Steward
Coolness
Quietness
Excellent Service
Unsurpassed
Cookery
These are some of the high
principles which go into
MACK'S
Tea Room
There are other elements
which delight and please our
guests during a dainty lunch-
eon here.
Open during Store hours.
Ladies Rest and Corres-
pondence Room in connection.
MACK & CO.
Cor. Main and Lierty

LYNDON, PHOTOGRAPHER
Ann Arbor's Headquarters for Kodaks, Cameras and Photo Supples
I make a Specialty of developing, Printing and Enlarging for Amateurs
--by modern Methods. This has been my business for to years and it has
increased every day-only results will do this and so whenever you want
anything photographic look for the sign of the kodak- thats where things
move.
LYNDON d
719 N. University Kodaks for 10c per day

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