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July 14, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1914-07-14

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AT YOUR DOOR THRREE THE ONLY OFFICIAL
EVENINGS A WEEK,75c SUMMER PUBCATION

Vol. V.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 14, 1914.

No. 9.

BOAT CLUB PLANS
SUMMER CARNIVAL
U Enough Interest Is Shown, T Uion
Organizatian{ Dil Stage
Water Fee
PLAN EVENT' AS VENETIAN NIGHT'
If enough interest is manifested, a
sumnnner fete will be held "at the bend"
on te Huron river by the Michigan
Union boat club, Friday niht, August
7. The proposed event is a "Venetian
Night," with an array of decorated ca-
noes and a program of aquatic sports.
A regatta on larger proportions than
the one protosed for this summer was
held this spring, and the natural am-
phitheater about a quarter of a mile
above the boat house prved to be a
most advantageous site.
Among the features of the contem-
plated event are music, booths for re-
freshments and a "parade" of decorat-
ed canoes.
Those interested ie the project are
requested to call Henry S. Parsons,
commodore of the boat club at 374.
Unless enough interest is displayed,
tio further plans will be made.
FOREIGN STUDENTS' TO TAKE
FIRST OF SUIMEJI OUTINO'.
The Cosmopolitan club will hold its
first outing Saturday when the mem-
bers will journey to Whitmore lake
for a day of recreation, starting from
the Ann Arbor depot at 9:00 o'clock.
The trip is plahned for all foreign stu-
dents and all those who are interested
should call up either President W. C.
Sd oirecany oi dte eeiers or te
committee: . S. Sy; C. P. Wag;J.
A. Bonilla. 'there will be no expense
connected with the trip as the club
will bear all the expenses. It there
are enough men who can go a special
car will be arranged for.
Graduate Takes Daring Trip in Luzon
Julian Wolfson, '09, is now the
jugior member of the firm of Wolfsocc
& Wolfson, of Manila, P. I. A news-
paper cliping from Manila has reach-
ed this office, and contains an account
of how Wolfson and a companion made
a trip of two weeks through the wilds
of eastern Luzon to reach the proper-
ty of the imerai Gold Dredging com-
pany. They were guided most of the'
way by natives, and were obliged to
travel on carratelas, whaleboats and
pones.
"Campis Beautiful"D'ork Discontimued
The work in beautifying the cam-
pus, which was started early last
spring, has been discontinued duringi
the summer months, with the excep-
tioh of caring for the shrubs already
planted, and substituting new ones in
some places. The shrubs will be wat-
ered and carefully trimmed during thee
summer and the new ones will te plac-
ed in the gardens as soon as they ar-
rive.
Sbctaation Work :Nears Completion
The new' sub-station, which is situa-
ted south of the Waterman gymnasi
um; will be completed about the first
o September. 'The steam connections
wilt be in operation as soon as the
new power plant is put in commission
at the beginning of the fall term.

Library Gets Rare Thoreau Edition
Assistant Librarian '. L. Goodrich
hes recently received a shipment of
new books, "The Writings of Thoreau"
in 20 volumes. The set is a manuscript
edition and very rare. With this ship-
ment the library now has a complete
list of Thoreau editions.

PROFESSOR WORRELL 'FELLTS O1 MANYIFOOTBALIATES
E tN- CHSANS EFBAI.U L DURIUMER
CHASE BALI DuRING SUMMER

Says Nearly All Inhabitants eHave Eye-
Trouble; llildings Well
Preserved
"Ninety per cent of the people of
Egypt are said to have some kind of
eye disease," said Prof. W. H. Worrell,
of Hartford, Conn., in his lecture on
"A Trip Through Egypt" which hee
gave last night in the west physics
amphitheater. "Cross eyes are very
common, occurring in about 15 or 20
per cent of the people. They are con-
sidered a mark of beauty in the owom-
en," te added in describing the condi-
tions of the population of Egypt.
Professor Worrell illustrated his
lecture with many slides, showing the
ancient monasteries, cliff dwellers,
pyramids, and other buildings which
were erected between 300 It. C. and
60 A.D. Most of these structures
show a remarkable preservation ine
spite of their age which is due to the
even, rdy climate of the country. One
of the most striking things of the
Egyptian houses, that Professor Wor-
rell found was the absence of roofs.
He said that these were not necessary
in most parts of the country. because
rains do not occur oftener than once'
a year, and in some places, once ine
10 years.
He also found that sanitation is not
very far advanced in the Egyptian cit-
ies as an illustration. Concerning it, he
said, "There is nothing here that
agrees with our modern idea o hygi-
ene. louses are built on the ruins of
others and the litter is thrown out of
the windows into the street."
SUMMER STUDENTS WILL TAKE
ANNUAL NIAGARA EXCURSION
Pro. Sauer and Party Wita Spend
Week End Seeing Sights
at Falls
Professor C. o. Sauer of the geology
department will conduct an excursion
to Niagara Falls on Friday July 17.
The party will take the interurban
for Detroit Friday afternoon and will
connect with the lake steamer which
leaves there for E falo at 5:0 o'clock.
The journey will include a day-
light trip down the river, and a night
aboard the boat on Lake Erie; a trol-
ley ride along Niagara river from Buf-
falo to Niagara Falls, and a ride
around the Gorge on both the Amneri-
can and Canadian sides, which will
occupy most of Saturday. The party
will stay at the Falls Saturday night,
and Sunday will be spent in seeing
Niagara Falls and Buffalo, according
to individual inclination. The explor-
ers will leave Buffalo Sunday night
for Detroit, and will return to Ann
Arbor Monday morning. The mini-
mum expense for the trip, including
fare, berths, hotel and extra meals will
be $13.00
Although part of the time will be
given up to a geological study of the
various formations, the point cif view
of the ordinary sight-ser will not b
overlooked. Already quite a large
eumber of names have been haned: in
to Professor Sauer. All those who in
'end to take the trip should register
before Wednesday at the university
museum, first floor.
Profesor Sauer, Will give anE ills-
trated lecture on "Niagara Falls," at
11:00 o'clock in the nuseuslecture
room.
Righter Born to Y. 16 A Secret ary
A daughter was born Sunday, July
12, to Mr. and Mrs. Wellington Tinker

at 427 East University. Mr. Tinker is
religious secretary of the university.
Y. M. C. A..

Eleven 3en to Practice on Ferry Field
ic Preparation Fo Fall's
Schedule
With the hardest schedule in thee
history of the school rapidly approach-
ing. the candidates for next fall's var-
sity football team, who are attending
summer session, have organized them-
selves, and plan to make a daily chase
with the pigskin part of their pro-
gram until the end of August.
The roll when counted numbers 11
men and lists the following names:
Bughitt, Barton, Lyons, McHale,
Meade, Millard, Galt, Achi, Huebel,
Nieman and Staatz. Of these men,
FHughitt, Harton, Lyons, McHale and
Galt already boast a varsity "M," and
need no introduction. Meade is the
lanky fullback who was recruited
from the 1016 all-fresh team, and who
showed all sorts of fighting spirit
when Yost saw fit to use him last fall.
Millard has a record of two years' ser-
vice on the reserves,' and should he
gain a little in speed, will make a
strong bid for a linesman's berth.
The Hawaiian islands claim Achi
as an "M" aspirant. He weighs 180
and has had football experience at oth-
er schools. Playiecg center is his
strong toint and, with the vacancy
there, probably the biggest conun-
drum of the lot, he will be given a
good chance to show his worth. Staatz
played at end on the reserves last
fall, and made a name for himself as
one of the fastest men on the field.
Nieman and el elo are two Menomi-
nee lads who oreceised their all-fresh
cir"erets at the'close 'f last season.
Niesnmece eas eleted 'withe Maulbetch
use ofi e the two mot valuable men
on fleeall-freshsuad.
In addition to these, several can-
didates, who are not attending sum-
ner session, are making Ann Arbor
their training grounds for the sum-
mer. "Maulie" Maulbetsch, last year's
All-fresh captain, and the man to
whom the rooters are looking forward
to for great things next fall, is en-
gaged in the construction work on
the Newberry Residence hall. Watson,
Hildiner, and Menefee, all of whom
are promising material, are hardening
their muscles doing labor on the new
concrete stadium.
Y. Xt C a SUPPLIES WORK
TO MANY SI').1ER STUDENTS
Employment has been given to 400
students since June 1, by the univer-
sity Y. M. C. A. Out of this number
250 are students not attending the
summer session. These have been giv-
en work in business places, in facto-
ries, and at canvassing. The Maxwell
motor company has engaged 30 for the
summer, as traveling salesmen and ad-
vertisin agents.
About 50 summer school students
have been supplied with board jobs,
and 50 ..cwith steady work. Sev-
eral students are working on the vari-
ous new construction works of the
University.
Odd job work is furnished for about
30 summer students, but at present
several of these are unoccupied be-
cause of the scarcity of jobs turned
in at the office. Patrons are requested
to telephone to 208, on the day before
the work is to be done.
DOMEN TO E ENTERTAINED
A'T GYMNASIL'M THURSDAY
A reception for all summer session
women will be held at Barbour gymna-
sium from 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock Thurs-
day. Refreshments will be served and
an entertainment of some kind will be
provided.

FACULTY OFFERS FREE CONCERT
School of1 Music Teachers to Ge
Program 'omorrow
Among the summer session attrac-
tions for the week is the recital to be
given by the faculty of the school of
music in Hill auditorium at 8:00
o'clock tomorrow night. The affair is
complimentary to the public. The
program, which has been revised since
it was announced last week, is as fol-
lows:
Variations F minor-Haydn; Hark,
hark, the lark-Schubert-Liszt; Pene-
tential Song-Beethoven-Liszt. By
Albert Lockwood.
Ave Maria-Luzzi. By Nora Crane
Hunt.
Meditation-Massenet; Chanson Louis
XIII, Pavane, Aubade provencale;
Caprice Viennois-Kreisler. By Emi-
ly Sadler Stanton.
Minuet-Rameau-Godowsky; Reflets
dans 'eau-Debussy; Intermezzo Op.
76 No. 4-Brahms; Waldesrauschen--
Liszt. By Albert Lockwood.
The Brownies-Leoni; Sumber
Song-MacFadyen; In Summertime-
German. By Nora Crane Hunt.
Accumpaniments by Miss Frances
Louise Hamilton.
UNIVERSITY Y. -. C. AL .IOVES
OFFICESTO NEWBEIRUIY RALL
Offices of the University Y. M. C. A.
were moved last week from the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A. building, 212 South
State street to Newberry hall, 423 So.
State.
The employment, boarding and
rooming and religious work bureaus,
also the pay-station for Busrah pledg-
es, will have their headquarters there
for the rest of the sunmmer.
RAIN PREVENTS PRACTICE
OF DEPARTMENTAL TEAMS
Showers Make it Impossible for 'ana-
gars to Collect Fees for Par-
chase of Supplies
Heavy showers interfered with prac-
tice for the teams in the interdepart-
mental baseball league yesterday af-
ternoon, making it impossible for the
managers to collect the 25 cent assess-
ment which was to be levied on the
tryouts for purchasing balls and other
paraphernalia. This will be done at
this afternoon's practice so that balls
may be procured in time for the first
game which will be played tomorrow
at 4:30 o'clock between the laws and
engineers.
The managers of both these teams
request that all who have tried out
for either team or have had any inten-
tion of doing so, report at south Ferry
field at 4:00 o'clock, and an effort will
be made to give everyone a chance to
show his ability. The game will last
seven innings.
Many of the players have already
availed themselves of the lockers in
the intramural clubhouse, and any
others who desire to do so are request-
ed to help themselves. The shower
baths in the clubhouse have been plac-
ed in condition for use.
SEATS FOR WOODLAND PLAYS
TO GO ON SALE NEXT WEEK
Seats for the five Ben Greet Wood-
land performances, to be held on the
campus July 23-25 inclusive, will go
on sale at Wahr's bookstore at 4:00
o'clock, Monday, July 20. The price
for reserved seats is 75 cents.

The Ben Greet players will feature
'Masques and Faces"' by Reade and
Taylor as their opening performance.
The other four will be popular Shak-
-spearean comedies.

PROF. HAMILTON IS
TO LEAVE MICHIGAN
Economaics Teacher Receives Better
Position a: University
of Chicago,
HAS TAUGHT HERE FOUR YEARS
Walton H. Hamilton, assistant pro-
fessor of political economy, has peti-
tioned the board of regents for his res-
ignation, and has accepted a position
as assistant professor of political econ-
omy at the University of Chicago at a
considerable increase in salary. Pro-
fessor Hamilton has taught here for
four years, first as an instructor and
then as assistant professor. In addi-
tion to the elementary courses, he has
had charge of courses in current prob-
lems and industrial reforms.
Professor Hamilton will enter the
department at Chicago under Prom. J.
L. Laughlin, and will have charge of
courses in economic theoby, mostly
graduate work. The chair has been
formerly filled by Prof. H. J. Daven-
port, of the University of Missouri and
Prof. Alvin S. Johnson. of Cornell,
both specialists in matters of political
economy. For three years since the
departure of Professor Johnson, the
work has been scattered, but will be
brought together again in the fall un-
der Professor Hamilton.
No one has yet been appointed to
fill Professor Hamilton's place at
Michigan.
SAYS O1'TLOOK IS OPTIMISTIC
Dr. Cummings Thinks Venereal Dis-
ease Situation i Exaggerated
In his lecture 1'ast week umi 11cc Cci-
versity Health Service, Dr. . H. Cum-
mings laid stress on the success which
had been met with in the checking
and treatment of venereal diseases
among the students, contrary to the
general opinion about the state.
He stated that as far as had been as-
certained, not more than 60 active
cases had occurred this year among
the students, and that such a record is
especially commendable for any place
containing 5,000 students. He said
this change was due to the instruction
by wise parents, and unselfish teach-
ers, and also to the enforcement of the
law, prohibiting the sale of liquor to
students.
"Next year," he said, "our aim will
be to prevent disease. It will take
time and effort to teach personal hy-
giene to prevent disease. It will take
time and effort to teach personal hygi-
ene to every student; to instill into
every mind thoughtfulness for the
other fellow; to show that clean liv-
ing and efficiency go hand in hand;
and to, make our slogan "Every Mich-
igan student sound; sound mentally,
morally and physically."
BEGIN NEW TILE SYSTEM
TO CARRY LIGHTING WIRES
To make the campus lighting sys-
tem more efficient, a new tile system
is being installed, by which the wires
will be strung through four-inch tiles
a short distance below the surface.
This method will replace the former
device of running the wires through
the heating tunnels. The system will
extend only to the law building this
year, but in a few years will be en-
larged to include all of the lighting
wires on the campus.
The work is being caried on in a

direct line from the sub-station near
Waterman gymnasium to the law
building. Man holes are being dug
along this course, for joining the ca-
bles, when work in extending the sys-
tem to other buildings is begun.
The present portion of the work
will be completed in about four weeks.

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