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August 16, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1917-08-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WOLVERINE

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FOUR MILITARY COURSE MEN
WILL ENTER FORT SHERIDAN
To Give Banquet in Honor of the Four
Applicants at Saline This
Evening
Four of the six men in Major C. E.
Wilson's military courses that applied
for admission in the second training
camp at the Great Lakes were notified
by the officials to report for duty Au-
gust 27,
The men who qualified are: J. H.
Taylor, H. Bodie. 0. W. Prescott and
P. 0. Tucker. A banquet, in honor of
the four students, will. be given to-
night at Saline. Several prominent
speakers are engaged for the occasion.
A reserve officer frotp Fort Sher-
idan instructed the classes in bayonet
drill this afternoon. The students are
receiving a thorough training in the
use of handling the, rifle, and will
continue- drilling until the completion
of the summer session.
"Mr. Ima Prune Joins the Army,"
and Captain Volland's companies star-
red, will be shown at one of the local
theaters tonight for the benefit of
both divisions.
Leaves to Examine Biological Work
Prof. Jacob Reighard left today for
the biological camp at Douglas lake
to inspect the work of Mr. W. N. Koelz
who has been studying fish of the
Great Lakes under Prof. Reighard's
direction. His specimens will be
mounted and placed in the museum.
Plans are being made to establish fish
hatcheries on some of the small lakes
in Michigan.
CLASSIFIED
WANTED-- Furnished flat or small
house for five or six boys for next
fall. State price, number of rooms,
location, etc. Box J., Wolverine.

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COMPANY I BOYS LEAVE ANN
ARBOR ON MICHIGAN CENTRAL
(Continued from Page 'One)
aloud, the while she clung to her son,
that the agony of parting might soon
be over, and the vice-like band clasp
of a father, at the last minute, made a
strong young solder wince, as the or-
der was given to entrain.
Martial Music Cheers Everyone
Directly behind the members of
Company I, Otto's band struck up a
stirring march. It took some of the
pathos out of the atmosphere. Even
the mothers and sweethearts bright-
ened under the influence of the martial
music.
Each soldier was presented a box of
eatables, a few magazines and nick-
nacks for the journey by a friend. The
khaki boys were all smiling and only
one thing marred this departure-
that was, they were not going direct
to France. The soldiers detested the
idea of remaining in a training camp
for two or three months without see-
ing active service, in Europe.
Boys Given Rousing Farewell
A great cheer went up from the men
in Company I and the thousands on
the station platform as the train start-
ed on its way to Grayling at 9:21
o'clock. When the last coach disap-
peared around the curve, the crowd
disbanded and went to their homes.
Company I left with the assurance
that Ann Arbor is interested in it, as
a company, and each individual man
who goes to make up its membership.
A substantial recognition of this in-
terest was taken with them in the
$1,200 presented to Captain Volland,
by the citizens of Ann Arbor, for a
mess fund.
Subscribe for The Wolverine and re-
ceive a Student Directory free.

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LYND ON'S, 719 N. University Ave.
FOR
Eastman Kodaks Eastman Films
Guaranteed Amateur Finishing
Znlargements from your Negatives a Specialty
I have led while others followed in amateur finishing for twelve
years. Now we are still leading. We guarantee perfect results
or no charge. We give you "Peace Time Results" as we have
a plenty of Metol (which we could sell at $50.00 per lb.) and
we venture to say that no other firm is using Metol for finishing.
If you want the best results you will Biring your films here.

Two doors from
Hill Auditorium

LYND O N'S

719 North
University Avenue

The New Catalogue
of the
Ullivorsity of Michigal
IS NOW READY
Complete information concerning the eight Colleges and Schools:
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS, EN-
GINEERING, MEDICINE, LAW, PHARMACY,
HOMEOPATHY,:DENTISTRY, GRADUATE, AND
THE SUMMER SESSION
Special Courses in Forestry, Newspaper Work, Land-
scape Design, Higher Commercial Education, including
Railway Administration and Insurance, Architecture,
Conservation Engineering, Education (affiliated with
Ann Arbor Schools for Observation Study), and a
Course for those preparing for the scientific administra-
tion of departments of sanitation and public health.
For Copy of Catalogue, Special Announcement, or Individual
Information, address
The Dean of the School or College in which interested, or
SHIRLEY W, SMITH
Secretary University Ann Arbor, Michigan

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PEGGY DISCOSSES
DOG ABMD-IIVES
Says SeIf-Protection Is First Thought
That Drives Any Nation
to War
OPPOSES GERMAN WORLD-RULE
This is the fourth of the series of
articles by Stuart H. Perry, editor of
the Adrain Telegram, which were first
printed in the Telegram and in the
Detroit Free Press.
The last three articles have pointed
out the common interests that draw
America and the allies together, the
common dangers that drive them to-
gether, and the special dangers to the
United States that impel us to make
common cause with the allies. First
among these special dangers was the
certainty that we should have been
compelled to fight Germany in the
near future and to fight her without
help.
IV.-Germany's Motives for Attacking
the United States
Why should we have been forced to
fight Germany immediately, or at all?
That question was ,in many people's
minds. It is a fair question and de-
mands an answer.
The answer is this: We should have
had to fight Germany because Ger-
many would have attacked us. And
here are the reasons why Germany
would have attacked us if we had re-
mained neutral and she had beaten
the allies.
1. Self protection. This is the first
motive that impels any nation to war.
In the case of a militant power like
Germany, the force of arms is invok-
ed early. Germany does not wait, like
the rabbit, until resistance is only a
death struggle; her plan is to antici-
pate danger.
Germany Would Make Victory
Permanent
In the case of-a German triumph
over the allies, Germany's first step
would be to confirm her victory and
make it permanent. There are two
ways of rendering an enemy country
harmless-one is destroying or per-
manently crippling it; the other is
making an ally or dependencyout of
it. France and England would be left
permanently crippled,rand never
would be permitted to regain enough
strength to get upon their feet again
Japan would become Germany's ally
Italy would become a vassal state.
Turkey would be a German depend-
ency. In Russia the old autocracy
would be restored by German bayon-
ets and an alliance formed with the
czar.
America is squarely against the idea
of German world-rule and could be
depended upon to oppose it at all
times, and to join Germany's enemies
the first time Germany might have a
war-perhaps to help defeated France
and England to rise in revolt against
their masters.
With such an outlook. what would
Germany do? From the Prussian
standpoint common prudence would
compel her to dispose of such an ene-
my at once, before it could do harm.
Says Germany Will Be Exhausted
2. Gain. Next to self-preservation,
ope of gain is the strongest spring
hat moves the machinery of war. In
tis case gain would be colossal and
mmediate.
The end of this war will see Ger-
nany exhausted to the last degree.

Germany must have money-vast
mounts of it, even if she were vic-
orious. Where could she get it?
There would be but one place-
America. On this side is the richest
ation in the world-richer before the
war than Germany and England com-
ined--richer now than all Europe.
Germany would have five million
The Farmers Mechanics Biak
auth Main Street State Street Office
Corner Hrn 30s o.State St
6000 STRONG BANK WITH EVERY BANKING NEED

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veteran troops; she would have lier
own navy and Britain's too; she would
have bitter grievances against the
United States; all the allied countries
would be disarmed and helpless, and
America would not have a friend or
earth. What would happen? Ask Bel-
gium!
3. Resentment. This is the third
in importanes among the causes of
war-net the first, as some might sup-
pose. it is less potent than fear or
desire for gain, but it would be potent
enough in this case to make Germany
eager for a war that promised not only
satisfaction for many bitter griev-
ances, but also insured future safety
and enormous profits.
Monroe Doctrine Starts Trouble
Germany's resentment against us
began with the Monroe doctrine, which
has always been a thorn in the flesh
of the German government because it

barred the way to German expansion
in Central and South America.
At the time of the Spanish war Ger-
many sought to form a European coal-
ition against us, but was thwarted by
England. The German admiral at
Manila bay, who tried to browbeat Ad-
miral Dewey, acted unquestionably un-
der orders from Berlin, because Ger-
many did not want the United States
to get the Philippines.
Next came the German intrigue in
Venezuela, which was thwarted by i
virtual ultimatum from President
Roosevelt-an ultimatium that the
kaiser knew would be supported by
England.
CIHOP SVEY
Open During Summer Schotl
I A. M. to 5 P. M.
MICHIGAN INN
Phone 948-R 6001 E. Lberty St.

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SHEE H'AN Co
Summer School Supplies
and Books Now Ready
Tuttle's
Lunch Ro
Will move September 1st from
338 State Street to 338 Maynard
Street, where they will be ready
to give increased service to their
patrons about September 25th
Cleanliness, Purity and Service
Will continue to be their
motto.
Detroit
to
SPut-in-Bay - Cedar Point
Cleveland -Sandusky F
Daylight Across the Lake
) IIh

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Every Day Excursions to Put-in-Bay
Round Trio Fare Round Trip
Same day on Sunda's or
Week Days 75c Holidays 1e0J
Cedar Point Excursik ns 25 Round
Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Friday -N Trip
Cleveland One Way Fare, Every Day, $1.75
Big Steel Steamer "Put-in-Bay" leaves Detroit everyday
at 8:00a. m., Central Standard Time.
Steel Side Wheel Steamer "FrankE.Kirby"leavesDetroit
week days at 4:00 p. m., Central Time.
FREE DANCING-Finzel's Orchestra on Str. "Put-in-Bay"
whole aiternoat sPat-it-flay. Tea and ose-half hears at Cede,
Pot. visit Perry $1,0t-0,0 MBemorial, the Caves, Casins, Dose
Pavilion,Big HitellBashing Beaches, Aquatic Slides, Boad Walks,
Midweay, Lagoonstc.
First Street Wharf, Detroit
Write tar Folders
Ashley & Dustin Steamer Line
Detroit, Michigan

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