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June 30, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1917-06-30

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THE WOLVERINE
O AA ! 1WHY SO MANY MEN ARE RE-
A n n eA rb o r sN K S OWJECTED FOR U. . SERVICE
INPHYSICDWriesNew One! FALPOOSPEC Indianapolis, June 29.-Why so many
mH9nNare rejected for military srie
___3___zDr. 'o r Iltell I'roduces u r P o eis partially explained by the weekly
Recent Gyusuasiut lmprusemnuts Ex- f 1 l '1 ititi de nts Answering Questloss uf report of Recruiting Officer Sergeant
pelced to Draw lI Ru Fraunc lrd 110 EnrGllmeut G. C. Wright, compiled after the re-
l Speculations t. 1 ,driv. f c it i th Unitod

Is i
Practical work in physical training
will be offered during the summer ses-
sion under the direction of Dr. George
May. The courses will be optional and
no credit will be given. Owing to the
enlargement of the gymnasium and its
modern facilities and conveniences, it
is expected that a large number -of' the
summer session students will enroll
for the course. During recent summers
at least several hundred have taken
the course.
Some of the new improvements in
the gymnasium are the enlarged run-
ning track, now ten laps, the addition
of a large number of lockers and a
larger and more modern shower-bath
room. Director May also stated yes-
terday that students could make use of
the. outdoor running track adjacent to
Waterman gymnasium.
Classes in this course will be held
as follows: Practical work, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at 4 o'clock;
lectures, Tuesday and Thursday at 4
o'clock. These hours, days and the
kind of work taken up will be changed
and regulated according to the indi-
vidual needs of the students.
Locker tickets can be secured at the
treasurer's office at 50 cents. Students
wishing to register for the course can
do so at the gymnasium between the
hours of 10 to 12 and 2 to 5 daily ex-
cept Saturdays. Those intending to
take the work are urged to register as
soon as possible so as 10 prevent un-
necessary changes in the schedule.
During the summer session the gym-
nasium will be open each day until
5:30 o'clock, with the exception of
Saturday, when it closes at 5 o'clock.
NATIOIL FORESTS TO
SOPPLYWINIER IEEL
Look for Scareity of Coal During
Cold Months Because of War
and Transportation
Washington, June 29.-To meet any
possible coal shortage in the West
next winter, more extensive use of
fuel wood from the national forests is
urged by the government's foresters,
who are advising both ranchers and
town' dwellers to be forehanded in
making arrangements for the supply
of their fuel needs.
The supervisors of the 153 national
forests will be instructed to afford all
possible facilities to local residents
wishing to obtain cordwood, which set-
tlers may obtain free for their home
use and which is sold at low rates to
persons cutting and hauling in order
to sell to others. Since the material
thus utilized is mainly dead timber, its
removal, it is explained, helps clear
up the forest and thus lessens the fire
menace. Timber which is insect-in-
fested, or old and deteriorating, or
otherwise damaged or undesirable
from the forester's standpoint, is also
disposed of for fuel purposes. The
demand in the next twelve months is
expected to break all records.
There is a possibility of a coal short-
age because of the increased demand
for coal by industrial plants and the
lack of sufficient means of transporta-
tion. It is believed that it will be
quite feasible and economical for many
western communities to utilize an in-
creased quantity of national forest
wood for fuel next winter. When dead
and down timber or other timber which
is deteriorating is not available for
cordwood, the cutting of mature liv-
ing trees will be permitted to the ex-
tent neebssary to meet demands.

Ann Arbor's Poet Laureate, Dr.
Tom Loell, has again broken into
print, his time with a typical war
potm tellint of the swountditgcof his
s atth11r int in s 01 battle is
Prane. The hector's son was taken
to a hospital. and after recovering'
ftrom the wounds was again sent to
t( front ranks where he is fightint
at tpresent.
Dr .Lovecl asserts this is one of his
best prodctions and wants to e-
;hasize that all rights are reserved.
'The poem is as follows:
\ Leter from iy Wounded Son Who
Was Wounded on April 9, 1917, on
Vimy Judge in 1rane."
It was on Vimy Ridge where I fell
dad
''hat battle I will never forget
Comrades that fell 'mid shot. and shell
Ftlling dead around me right and left.
ily seetheartI 1 see in the battle
Who in yott rso I said too good bye.
And when I found it was only a
wound.
When I knew it, that filled me witht
joy.
It
If you could have seen the carnage
dad
After the victory was well won
lily self laying among the wounded
To thsink, thak God, I am still your
Which I hope I will be spared to tell
Ios thankful to Cod I am
To be one to survive in that conflict
there,
The battle on that Vimy Ridge to a
man
III
From the battle I cas taken to a hos-
Whet ety'ionds-were-iressed ai
care,
he I thoughtt like a flash of light-
ning
Thank God through it all I was spar
ed;
To get in the trenehes again
.ile-a man to see ono ttw o
Ihat is victory or fall in death
To be one to see the hattle right
through.
IV
-When I gripped your hand and said
'ooyl e idt,
Which is found in your masterpiece
I canttell you it cheered me when I
fell
On that Vimy Ridge 'mid shot and
shell;
And others shot dead but your son
Who was spared to sing Good-bye
Sweetheart
in your song which you sent me one
,day
To keep in memory how we both had
to hart.
V
What will be the outcome of the battle
dad?
I hardly know just what to say,
Only this, now as we iud Uncle Sam
Withs trieflags jinei togeteir its a
,w ay
What will make the enemy terrified
When all three nations get in full
play,
To end the war in another Waterloo
When autdcracy in Kings will have
to say.
VI
'Tho itl1 take us time to do it dad
With Uncle Sam to help us through.
ft will be done as sure as Heaven
Because Kaisers system will never do;
Knowing full well of the kiIng of
Children.
And old men and women in the street,
Which will be the thing to let him see
'fhat it the end he will meet his de-
feat.

I 'J " " .'., cnt u ev; or r lEcrulL 11n 111W U Le(

Results obtained from the circula-
tion of information blanks to the stu-
dents of the University during last
semester's examinations have not yet
been tabulated by the secretary of the
University, but it is generally esti-
mated by the secretaries of the various
sctools that a large nunher of stu-
denttsswil be back next fall.
The questions asked were mainly
concerned with the student's prospects
of being back in school next semester,
and if not, why not. The negative an-
swers were on the whole because the
student intended to enlist, or because
of financial difficulties. One class in
lie law school, after having inveti-
gatedtand enumeratedathe blank,
showed that all but two per cent of the
students would be back next semester.
PSYOHOPSEUDOGROANS
(fy Peck)
Of all the sports there is one in
particular that is engaged in mostly
by state institutions.
Strangely as yet comparatively few
of the Universities have competed.
The game is known by name as P'ing
t'ong.
Yes, yes, we'll explain, to those who
do not know.
The men are all clad in suitable
uniforms.
In order to keep the game from be-
comng too fast a large, heavy ball
is fasened to each player's foot.
This also tends to keep each indi-
vidual from covering too much ground.
The game is played where there are
plenty of large rocks.
Each contestant is also supplied
with a heavy hammer.
The object of the game is to make
as many small rocks as possible of a
given number of big rocks.
It's astonishing to look around and
see how many of the Girls' League
houses have been turned into old
ladies' homes.
D 't Take This Too Literally
Though
Walt Mason says, Actions speak
louder than flags.
With the return of the fly and the
mosquito the bald head has agani be-
come of some use. The afore-mention-
ed areas afford splendid opportunities
for roller skating contests which is a
major sport with the pests.
Why not put the Chimes on Barbour
Gym?
Maurie Dunne would probably like
to hear of them being on Martha Cook
Dorm
A niaa militiaman wrote a friend
at the Officers training camp saying,
"Mac, wouldn't it be tough to live
through about ten years of hard fight-
ing, and the first day home to be run
down and killed by a Ford?"
Mrs. T. L. Stoddard
Marcel and

Water Waving
Hair Goods and Cosmetics
707 North University Avenue
Phone 296-J

.
,j
j
.{
/L

Stoles marine corps.
Out of 192 applications for enlist-
went during the week only 24 were ac-
cepted. Others were rejected for the
following causes: Under age, 31; un-
derweight, 30; defective vision, 26; de-
fe'tive hearing, 4; flat feet, 16. Sixty-
ote others were rejected as "undesir-
aisle" through failure to meet the ex-
acting mental, moral, and physical re-
quirements.
The standard of the "Soldiers of the

Sea" is very high, though certain modi-
fications may be put into effect later,
should it be necessary to follow the
precedent of the countries that have
been draining their man power for
three years. Sergeant Wright says
that at present 12 per cent is about
the average of acceptances throughout
lie country.
tll c ding looms Open All Summer
Both the reading room and the of-
fices of the lichigan Union will be
open during the entire summer session
for the benefit of students of the Uni-
versity. The magazines of the reading
rotom have been supplied with leather
covers, and the periodicals are kept in
first class shape regardless of the
amount of handling.

'I;

SUMMER. SCHOOL
NEW AND SECOND-HAND .
DRAWING INSTRVMENTS
Snxpp ii . of All Kired
'The Slater Book Shop
P'horxe 430 336 so. state St

I

- - - waMUSritr eo a

OF THE
SCHOOL of SHORTHAND
BEGINS MONDAY, JULY 2

.

COMPLETE COUR SES GIVEN
IN ALL
COMMERCIAL BRANCHES
With so many young men responding to their
country's call,'there is sure to be a tremendous demand
for capable young women in the commercial field.
Prepare to do your part by taking our complete course.
There is also a great demand for men stenograph-
ers for the higher officers in the army.
SCHOOL OF SHORTHAND
OFFICE HOURS: 711 N. UNIV. AVE.
I:SO - t:3O P. M.
THE BEST PART
ISummer School
Official Summer School Paper
AT YOUR DOOR THREE TIMES A WEEK
A SUMMER SCHOOL DIRECTORY FREE
WITH EACH SUBSCRIPTION

The best advertising is Wolverine Try The Wolverine want
advertising. sults.
Read The Wolverine and be posted The Wolverine delivere
on all events in town and school. door all summer for 75c.

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