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August 16, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Wolverine, 1917-08-16

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AYORDOOR
3,TME EEJ

r e

THE ONLY OFFICIAL
J~i~ mrw UMMERLNEWSPAPER

VOL. VIII. No. 22 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 16, 1917 PAICE FIVE CENTS
94r -

KIIAKI CLAD,-M,11
LEAYE ANNABBOR
Company I Departs for Camp at Gray-
ling Amidst Cheers and
Music
'MANY TUTI'rsTNG FAREWELLS

'Oratory ClassTo
Render Readings
Class in Interpretative Reading Uinder
Mr. Eich to Give Program
Tonight
Miscellaneous readings by the class
in interpretative reading under thesin-
struction of Mr. Louis Eich will furn-

LA11EE U Un AI r a er ART ish an interesting program for the
SEEN AT TIME OFPARTN summer lecture series audiences at 8
o'clock tonight is University Hall. The
Soldiers Presented with Gifts and program includes many popular and
Mess Fund by People of humorous selections from modern au-
City thors.
The program is as follows:
Company I has left Ann Arbor. Songs of the Sandbags ......
War's reality was brought home to.. .. ..... Robert W. Service:
Ann Arbor as never before Wednes- C. A. Pautz.
day morning, when to the strains of Philosophy .. Paul Lawrence Dunbar
"The Girl I Left Behind Me," members Alice Johnston
of Company I marched from the armory Onthe Road .Paul Lawrence Dunbar
through streets banked with cheering Leila Bacon
men and tear-eyed women to the Mich- Ike Walter's Prayer ......-
igan Central depot, where they en-. ...........James Whitcomb Riley
trained for camp at Grayling on the H. G. King
first stage.of the journey that will.take Lincoln........... Edwin Markham
them to France. Winifred Werner
The line of march was north on Mucle Mouth Meg .. Robert Browning
Main street from the armory on De- Vera Berker
troit street to the depot. The pro- Her Folks and Hiz'n ...... Ben King
cession was headed by a flag bearer, Alice Johnston
which was in turn followed by Otto's The Man in the Moon .........
band and Company I. ............ James Whitcomb Riley
8,000 Witness Arrival at Station Florence Welts,
Over 8,000 gathered at the depot, Buck Fanshaw's Funeral..Mark Twain
completely covering the surrounding C. A. Pautz
elevations. Automobiles were parked Tradin' Joe .. James Whitcomb Riley
os both sides of the street for three A. G. Leonard
blocks. As the boys in khaki headed In order not to conflict with the
by the band arrived at the station reading, the educational motion pic-
thousands cheered and clapped their tures will be given at 7 p'clock instead
hands. of 8 o'clock tonight in the auditorium
Ranks were broken at the depot ofthe Natural Science building.
platform and the men were allowed 20
minutes to say the final good-byes to MANAGER TO PICK
their loved ones. CAMP DAVIS TEAM
Pathetic Scenes Mark Departure -
Mothers, drying their eyes between Ail-Camp Nine to Play Faculty on
words of counsel and affection to their
nons; fafhers, pride showing in their Visitors' Day; Have Two
faces, yet now and again swallowing Good Teams
hard the lumps that arose in their
throats; young girls, clinging to khaki- The All-Camp team which is to play
clad arms, trying hard to smile and the faculty on visitors' day, according
suceedig only in hysterically laugh- to the recent number of "The Black
Ing and sobbing by turn, assembled Fly," is soon to be picked by manager
here and there in groups. Woodward.
Many made heroic struggles to con- Camp Davis boasts of two baseball'
quer their emotions but failed. A leagues. Games are scheduled two
young wife fainted, a mother prayed nights a week, and the outcome of the
(Continued on Page Four) games last week resulted in the
Transits whipping the Alidades by a
4 to 3 score. The Staves took a nine-
MONTA6UE,'I8L, MADE ENSI6N nning contest from the Tapes, win-
igning by a 17 to 12 score.
Member of Great Lakes Division Re- Thestanding of the two leagues is
ceives Good Appointment as follows:
Mosquito League
Alexander S. Montague, '18L, one of Team. W. L. Pct.
the Michigan men who was in train- Faculty ............. 3 0 1.000
ing at the Great Lakes Naval Train- Heliotropes .......... 2 0 1.000
ing station, has been made an ensign Plumbobs ........:....2 1 .666
In the United States naval coast de- Tapes .................1 2 .111
fense, holding the position of assistant Staves ................1 3 .250
paymaster. While at the training sta- Rod . ........... . ..... 0 3 .000
tion Montague took the examination
held at Chicago, and was one of two Black Fly League
men from this state honored with the Teams. W. L. Pct.
position. Planimeters ...........3 0 1.000
Montague arrived in Ann Arbor yes- Transits .....'......... 3 1 .750
Jerday, enroute for North Carolina on Alidades ..............2 2 .500
a short tour. He was a member of Sextants . .............1 1 .500
the Delta Theta Phi law fraternity, Levels ...-.............0 2 .000
and a junior in the law schooL Axes.................0 3 .000

TWO MODE [[CUREST10
BE GIVYEN IHIS SOMMED
Mr. A. E. Wood and Prof. C. L. Meader
Give Last Addresses of
Series
Social service and Russian politics
furnish the material of the two last
lectures to be given in the summer
lectures series.
Mr. Arthur E. Wood, instructor in
the political economy department, will
deliver a lecture at 5 o'clock today in
the New Science building on "The
Present Status of Poor Relief in Amer-
ica." Mr. Wood will discuss the sev-
eral chief causes of poverty and the
work of the more important philan-
thropic and governmental agencies in
relieving poverty.
Prof. Meder Gives Last Lecture
The distinction of giving the last
lecture of the summer has been con-
ferred on Prof. C. L. Meader of the
department of languages, who will
talk on "Russia and America" at 5
o'clock Friday afternoon. Professor
Meader has been in Russia and made
a special study there of the Russian
language and also of the political and
economical condition of the people.
He will discuss the financial condition
of the Russian classes and the organ-
ization among the classes.
* NOTICE TO SUMMER
* STUDENTS
* *
* Registrar Arthur G. Hall will *
* be in Ann Arbor next week to see *
* those students who wish to con- *
* suilt him about the cooses to be *
* given in the University next fall. *
* All those students in summer *
* school who wish to have reports *
* of their class records sent to *
* them after the close of the sum- *
* mer session are requested to fill*
* out the proper blanks in the Reg- *
trar's office sometime before Au- *
gust 17.
* Students who are completing *
* the requirements for teacher's di- *
* ploma this summer must call at *
* the office of the secretary of the *
* department in which they are en- *
* rolled in order to fill out the nec- *
e essary applications.
Credit will not be given to any *
student who does not take the ex- *
aminations as scheduled on page
* 29 of the summer session catalog. *
* The examinations start on the aft-
ernoon of August 22, and last un-
til the afternoon of Friday, August
* 24. Schedules of them have been
* posted in all the University build-
* ings.
Many Apply for New Military Course
Already 50 to 60 applications for ad-
mission to the next Ordnance and
Quartermaster course have been re-
ceived. The third course begins Sep-
tember 15th and will be repeated
every six weeks throughout the year.
Union President Gets Commission
Charles W. Fisher, Jr.. who was
elected president of the Michigan
Union for the coming year, has receiv-
ed his commission as second lieuten-
ant of Fort Sheridan.

To Hold Visitors'
Day On Saturday
Camp Davis Men Arrange Day of
Feature Events for Annual
Celebration
Camp Davis, with its large quota of
engineers and foresters, will open to
visitors Saturday. This is an annual
event and every year hundreds of
students from the University, people
from the surrounding territory and
citizens of Ann Arbor motor to the
camp where they are entertained for
the day.
A program, consisting of sports and
inspection, has been arranged. The
civil engineering class of '18 will pre-
sent the following entertainment for
visitors:
9 o'clock-Arrival of visitors.
9-10 o'clock-Camp inspection.
10 o'clock-Land and water sports.
1 o'clock-Mess.
3 o'clock-Ball game on the hill.
(Elevator not running on account of
the war.)
4:30 o'clock-Sing on the beach.
5:30 o'clock-"The Yellow and the
Blue."
The officials for the occasion will
be: Prof. Johnston, field judge; Prof.
Raschbacher, referee; "Doc" Stouffer,
umpire; "Bleek" Bleekman, starter,
and "Polly" Akers, announcer.
LAST OF CONCERTS
WELL . PRESENTED
Two Ann Arbor Soloists Feature
Final Musical Program
of Season
The University School of Music
Choral Union presented the last com-
plimentary concert this summer, "Fair
Ellen," at 8 o'clock last night in Mill
auditorium.
The concert was under the direction
of Kenneth N. Westerman. The pro-
gram was featured by two Ann Ar-
bor soloists, Miss Ada Grace Johnson
and Robert R. Dieterle.
"Joshua," by Modest Moussorgsky,
was the first number, and received
several encores. It was particularly
suited to the voices of the soloists,
which was somewhat fascinating in its
syncopated rhythm.
The last selection featured "Fair
Ellen." This operatic piece brought
numerous applauses from the audi-
ence. The story deals with the rescue
of the English during a daring siege.
Max Brush, the author of "Fair El-
len," vividly portrayed the emotions
of the actors in the play. Otto Stahl
acted as the accompanist.
Complete Course in Red Cross Work
The course in surgical dressings has
just been completed, and another ser-
ies will be given by Mrs. I. D. Loree
early in the fall. The making of 21
kinds of bandages is taught. The
course is one of the required curricu-
lums in the training of a Red Cross
nurse.
Appoint New Engineering Instructor
Granville D. Jones has been ap-
pointed instructor in mathematics in
the Engineer college to fill the posi-
tion of William Garretson, who has
recently resigned.

Will HOLD FINALS
IN SINCLES JODAY
Redfern and Kirkpatrick Battle Way
to Finals by Fast Racquet
Work
START DOUBLES CONTEST FRIDAY
Redfern and Kirkpatrick are the two
contestants in the finals of the tennis
tournament singles who will play for
the championship at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon on South Ferry Field. The two
men have eliminated their opponents
in fast style, and judging from their
previous exhibitions both men will put
forth a strong game to capture the
tennis laurels.
Redfern, hailing from Georgia, is
one of the best racqueters to appear
on the Ferry Field courts this sum-
mer. His playing is fast and consist-
ent and with the experience he has
obtained from several tournaments In
the South, he will undoubtedly play a
brilliant game.
Kirkpatrick, who is a hard-driving
and fast player, has participated in
several -of the previous tournaments
at Michigan, and has always finished
with the top-notchers.
Semifinals Hard Fought
Fox and Buell were the two run-
ners-up in the semifinals who were
eliminated yesterday in two hard
fought matches. Fox was defeated
by Redfern by the score 7-5 and 6-1.
The first match was a deadlock from
start to finish, but Redfern took the
second game in easy style.
Kirkpatrick found hard competition
in eliminating Buell, winning by the
score 8-6 and 6-0, with Buel' grabbing
the second match by a 6-2 score. Buell
showed good form in the'second round
but fell down in the last set.
Start Doubles Tomorrow
The first elemination in the doubles
tennis tournament will be played this
afternoon, and the following schedule
has been arranged: Buell and Jeffries
vs. Redfern and Shields, Fox and
Langworthy vs. Fitzpatrick and
Penzotti, Doty and Kirkpatrick vs.
Doolittle and Sawyer, and Egley and
Burtis vs. Dawley and Klein.
The tennis tournament will prob-
ably extend to at least the first few
days of next week, but the finals must
be completed by Wednesday. The final
results will be published In the last
issue of The Wolverine on Thursday
of next week.
HOLD LAWN FETE TOMORROW
All University Women InvIted to At-
tend Affair
All University women are cordially
invited to attend the lawn fete which
will be given from 8 to 10 o'clock to-
morrow evening on the north lawn
of Newberry residence. A number of
members of the faculty, whose pres-
ence has been requestd by students
resident in Newberry, have also been
invited. The party is being given by
Miss Agnes B. Wells, the Women's
league, and the students of Newberry
residence.

25o
AT
Sheehan's
Wahr's
Slater's

THE SUMMER SCHOOL.
DIR ECTORY
NOW ON SALE '

25c
AT
Sheehan's
Wahr's
Slater's

Store . Subsoription rooelpts may be redeemed at any of these stores or at Wolverine OfflosStud t

ident.Supply

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